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HyperX Releases Dual-Channel DDR4 Kits For Z170 Motherboards

Intel launched information on its 6th generation "Skylake" Core processors, along with the Z170 chipset today. Z170 makes use of DDR4 memory, but not in the quad-channel configurations that x99 uses. Kingston has released dual-channel HyperX kits to pair with the new platform.

HyperX Fury DDR4 kits are optimized to work with Intel's new platform and comes in capacities ranging from 8 GB up to 64 GB. In addition to the range of capacities, HyperX is releasing these new DDR4 kits in three different frequencies: 2133 MHz, 2400 MHz and 2666 MHz, and they'll all operate at 1.2V.

Kingston said Fury DDR4 memory offers automatic overclocking, which is supposed to increase the speed of the memory just by installing it in a Z170 board. The company claimed no adjustment in the BIOS is needed.

Kingston said HyperX Fury DDR4 has been tested in all major motherboard brands to ensure compatibility, and offers a lifetime warranty along with free technical support in case you have problems. 

HyperX Fury DDR4 DIMMS are designed with a low-profile design and feature an all-black asymmetrical heat spreader. Dual channel kits are available now. Kingston didn't announce MSRP, but a quick search online showed 2x4 GB DDR4-2133 MHz kits available for under $70.

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 Kevin Carbotte is a contributing writer for Tom's Hardware who primarily covers VR and AR hardware. He has been writing for us for more than four years. 

  • tom10167
    "HyperX Fury DDR4 kits are optimized to work with Intel's new platform..."
    What'd they do?
    Reply
  • InvalidError
    16399994 said:
    "HyperX Fury DDR4 kits are optimized to work with Intel's new platform..."
    What'd they do?
    They picked up the required marketing fluff along with some actual testing on 100-series motherboards and Skylake engineering samples.
    Reply
  • MasterDell
    Really nice to see this all new and improved heatsink. (sarcasm)
    Reply
  • griffon9
    wait what? Isn't this Kingston Hyper X ddr4 RAM been around for at least half a year now? I bought it like 1 month ago. How can they say this is new release?
    Reply
  • ubercake
    I like seeing the price come down on the DDR4...
    Reply
  • RazberyBandit
    ubercake: I'm more impressed with how pricing continues to drop on DDR3, though. 16GB kits that were $150+ last Christmas season are now well under $100.

    I've never been impressed by Fury DIMMs. It's easy to find a rival from G-Skill, Mushkin, or Crucial with tighter timings for the same price, or less.
    Reply
  • InvalidError
    16401623 said:
    ubercake: I'm more impressed with how pricing continues to drop on DDR3, though. 16GB kits that were $150+ last Christmas season are now well under $100.
    This is actually scary since periods of ridiculously low DRAM prices like these usually end with one or more DRAM manufacturers filing for bankruptcy: a 16GB kit is 32 chips and at $80 per kit, that's likely less than $2.25 per 4Gbits chip after you remove the PCB, head spreader, assembly, packaging, distribution and other costs. I seriously doubt DRAM manufacturers are turning a profit on that.
    Reply
  • Phuntasm
    All of these non-16GB module kits are killing me. I want to be able to do 4x16GB in the long run. Start with 2x16GB, and then upgrade to 4x16GB. If I was using a -E platform, sure, I could do 8GB modules for 8x8=64GB, but Skylake-E is nowhere in sight. As such, if I want to use the latest arch I need 16GB modules.

    Why do 4GB-based kits even matter? We were supposed to get double the RAM with the move to DDR4, yet 8GB is the most we see, and there are plenty of phenomenally fast and relatively cheap choices in 8GB DDR3. So I expect 16GB to be the "it" for DDR4. Advertising 4GB modules seems asinine
    Reply
  • InvalidError
    16401825 said:
    Advertising 4GB modules seems asinine
    Why? Aside from super-users, compute-intensive professionals and gamers who leave tons of background stuff open, very few people actually require more than 8GB RAM in their systems and companies do not want to waste $50-80 extra per machine on memory their office PCs will never need. 2x4GB seems like exactly the right starting point for modern PCs to me.
    Reply
  • hannibal
    So true! I make some picture editing and 16gb is nice, but any normal human can do everything they need with 4Gb of memory. So having 8Gb is something extra.
    For video editing I would like to get 32 or 64Gb, but that is quite different thing.
    Reply