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HP Announces Intel-Powered Chromebook x2 Tablet

HP announced the Chromebook x2, a consumer-targeted Chromebook tablet with a detachable keyboard. The 12” tablet has a QHD IPS screen and an Intel i7 processor. It can be optioned with an active stylus, as well.

Chromebooks, such as Acer’s recently launched Chromebook Tab 10, are often targeted towards the education market, but with the x2, HP has its eyes set on consumers. With most Chromebooks being powered by Arm-based SoCs, an Intel mobile CPU with up to 8GB of LPDDR3 RAM is probably what passes for high-end in the Chromebook space. The x2’s other hardware includes 32GB of onboard storage, which is augmented by two years of access to 100GB of Google Drive.

The x2’s more interesting aspects are on the outside. At 15.3mm and 1.6lb, the tablet isn’t particularly thin or light, but it does have have a premium, all-aluminum design and dual frontal speakers. How the tablet works with its keyboard dock is curious: Unlike most magnetically attached keyboard covers, the x2’s keyboard dock is significantly more substantial. It has a laptop hinge built into it, which the tablet magnetically attaches to. The hinge allows the tablet to be angled backwards, just like in a laptop screen, without using the typical kickstand method. However, the tablet weighs more than the keyboard dock, so it can’t be angled too far back without toppling. It’s an interesting tradeoff because kickstands are notoriously un-lap-friendly.

The HP Chromebook x2 will be available at HP’s website and at Best Buy for a starting price of $600, starting June 10.

  • cleavisnowell
    Chrome is just proprietary Linux. I am thinking of installing MX -Linux OS on an older Chromebook.
    Reply
  • lperreault21
    Why the hell would *chromeOS* need a i7?

    A i3 would be overkill. All you can do is web browsing

    My HP Celeron Chromebook works completely fine
    Reply
  • sykozis
    I use a gen 2 Core i3 with CloudReady, which is based on ChromiumOS. I see no need whatsoever for an i7 for ChromeOS.
    Reply
  • sykozis
    20871640 said:
    Chrome is just proprietary Linux. I am thinking of installing MX -Linux OS on an older Chromebook.

    Chrome isn't a "proprietary Linux". Chrome is a web browser. ChromeOS is based on ChromiumOS, which was originally based on Ubuntu. Since Google isn't a system builder, ChromeOS can't be proprietary.... Also, if ChromeOS were proprietary, we wouldn't see Acer, HP, Dell, Asus, Lenovo, etc installing it on their systems.
    Reply
  • hannibal
    I7 because you can run Android app in some chromebooks. Videoediting could be more practical with i7...
    Reply
  • jaexyr
    HP has always been a sucker
    Reply
  • skywaterhulk
    Leon, you skimmed the press release. No where did it mention that these would have an Intel i7 processor. It said it would have a 7th generation Core (Kaby Lake) mobile processor. That's a wide range, including: Celeron, Pentium, m3 series, Xeon M, i3, i5 and yes, i7. If I was a betting man, I would put my money on the m3 series used by other comparable tablets with 8 GB of RAM. I'm really curious to see if the 32 GB is solder on board or a M.2 slot like on older ChromeBooks by HP. It makes upgrading and migrating to a true Linux distro so much easier without wiping the original SSD.
    Reply
  • extremepenguin
    Given that Adobe announced that their Creative Cloud suite was coming to Chrome OS I can see some need for an i7 for specific uses but the vast majority of the Chrome devices I am bringing in are Celeron based.
    Reply
  • lperreault21
    20874659 said:
    Given that Adobe announced that their Creative Cloud suite was coming to Chrome OS I can see some need for an i7 for specific uses but the vast majority of the Chrome devices I am bringing in are Celeron based.


    thats cool
    Reply
  • skywaterhulk
    20874659 said:
    Given that Adobe announced that their Creative Cloud suite was coming to Chrome OS I can see some need for an i7 for specific uses but the vast majority of the Chrome devices I am bringing in are Celeron based.

    Yes they offer Creative Cloud apps for ChromeOS, but there's a catch. They are NOT the same applications as Windows and Mac versions. They are the same version as the Android apps. http://blogs.adobe.com/contentcorner/2017/03/27/install-adobe-apps-on-your-chromebook/ Not really a powerhouse needed. The more powerful apps will be limited to streaming. PhotoShop Streaming.

    I wish they would come out with Linux versions of their application without running some Mac or Windows emulation layer to get them to run. This would be easier to port to ChromeOS if it was available.
    Reply