Skip to main content

Leaked Rocket Lake Reviews Hint That AMD Has Nothing To Worry About

Flaming Proc
(Image credit: Shutterstock)

Intel's 11th Generation Rocket Lake-S processors aren't in stores yet, but engineering and qualification samples of the chips are evidently going around the black market. Romanian news outlet Lab501 and a Chinese YouTuber have released early reviews of the Core i7-11700K and Core i9-11900K, respectively. Since these are not retail samples, we recommend caution when approaching the results.

By now, Rocket Lake-S shouldn't require any introductions. The forthcoming chips are still on Intel's 14nm process node but wield the new Cypress Cove cores, which Intel claims will bring IPC uplifts up to 19%. AMD's Ryzen 5000 (codename Vermeer) chips have dethroned Intel as the best gaming processor on the market, and the Blue Team is keen to recover its title. On the graphics end, Rocket Lake-S comes equipped with Intel's 12th Generation Xe LP graphics with a maximum configuration of up to 32 Execution Units (EUs).

The Core i7-11700K and Core i9-11900K are reportedly eight-core, 16-thread processors with a 125W TDP. Intel usually differentiats its Core i7 and i9 lineups by adding more cores (or threading) to the i9 series, but given a hard cap of eight cores for Rocket Lake, it appears that clock rates are the only difference between the two families.  

The Core i7-11700K has been rumored to feature a 3.6 GHz base clock, 5 GHz boost clock, and a 4.6 GHz all-core boost clock. Being the flagship part, the Core i9-11900K appears to have a 3.5 GHz base clock, 5.3 GHz boost clock, and a 4.8 GHz all-core boost clock.

Intel Core i7-11700K Benchmarks

Processor3Ds Studio Max 2020*Blender*DaVinci Resolve 15*HandBrake 1.2.2*WinRAR 5.917-Zip 19Cinebench R20POV-Ray 3.7PCMark 10Power Consumption*
Ryzen 7 5800X8595751334732,58894,7656.0355.4228,325224
Core i7-11700K9176311544828,07276,8165,6154,5057,927286

*Lower is better.

AMD's Ryzen 7 5800X simply dominated the Core i7-11700K across the board in terms of application performance. In some benchmarks, the margins were less than 10%, while in others, like WinRAR or 7-Zip, the Ryzen 7 5800X delivered up to 16.1% and 23.3% higher performance.

The Core i7-11700K's power consumption also stood out, and not in a good way. With a Prime95-induced load, the Core i7-11700K drew up to 286W. Unfortunately, Lab501 didn't include the Core i7-10700K to get an idea of the generation-over-generation power consumption. However, the Core i7-11700K pulled up to 27.7% more power than the Ryzen 7 5800X. Therefore, the Core i7-11700K wasn't just slower than the Ryzen 7 5800X, but it was more power hungry as well. 

ProcessorAverage4KWQHDFHD
Ryzen 7 5800X132.7689.20136.80163.15
Core i7-11700K131.2789.80133.90161.15

According to Lab501's results, the Ryzen 7 5800X was, on average, up to 1.1% faster than the Core i7-11700K. If we look at it individually, the Ryzen 7 5800X was marginally better than the Core i7-11700K in WQHD and FHD with differences of 2.2% and 1.2%, respectively.

Obviously, gaming is important for Intel, but the Core i7-11700K failed to help the chipmaker recover the lost ground. However, with such slim performance deltas, pricing could define the winner – we just don't know pricing for Rocket Lake yet. 

Intel Core i9-11900K Benchmarks

ProcessorPCMark 10BlenderX264 FHD BenchmarkV-RayCinebench R15CPU-Z Single ThreadCPU-Z Multi Thread
Core i9-11900K14,536142.0672.817,1812,526719.67035.5
Ryzen 7 5800X14,062164.4964.216,3172,354657.06366.0

The Core i9-11900K, on the other hand, had no problems outperforming the Ryzen 7 5800X in application workloads. Intel's chip pumped out between 3% to 13% more performance than the Ryzen 7 5800X.

ProcessorWolfenstein: YoungbloodTotal War: Three KingdomsPlayerUnknown's BattlegroundsCyberpunk 2077Hitman 3League of LegendsAssassin's Creed Valhalla
Ryzen 7 5800X366117215113156473123
Core i9-11900K353117215110158361122

It would seem that even the Core i9-11900K had trouble beating the Ryzen 7 5800X in gaming. Out of the seven titles, the Ryzen 7 5800X outpaced the Core i9-11900K in four of them. Both chips tied in two games, and the Core i9-11900K only managed to defeat the Ryzen 7 5800X in Hitman 3.

From what we've seen so far, the Core i7-11700K is no match for the Ryzen 7 5800X in either application or gaming workloads. Intel redeemed itself with the Core i9-11900K as it offers better application performance over the Ryzen 7 5800X. 

Gaming, which Intel is big on, still seems to be on the Ryzen 7 5800X's side though. Of course, we can't pass judgment until proper reviews come out.

Although it's hard to find any Zen 3 chips nowadays, the Ryzen 7 5800X retails for $449 when in stock. We can't be certain of Rocket Lake's pricing until the processors officialy come out. However, if preliminary retailer listings are even remotely accurate, the Core i7-11700K and Core i9-11900K may well end up with official price tags in the $450 and $600 range, respectively.

  • Why_Me
    I believe most of us including myself didn't see Rocket Lake being anything other than an affordable gaming cpu.
    Reply
  • spongiemaster
    Admin said:
    Foreign media outlet and YouTuber release early reviews of Intel's 11th Generation Core i7-11700K and Core i9-11900K (Rocket Lake-S) CPUs.

    Leaked Rocket Lake Reviews Hint That AMD Has Nothing To Worry About : Read more
    From the author of the article in the comment section:

    "In 99% of cases we tested ESs based on retail silicon. QS, so to speak. This time I had an alpha sample, so there may be differences. And new bios appear in the meantime. See you in March "

    An alpha sample is like an ES1 based sample. I would not put much stock in such an early test sample. In the end it will come down to availability and prices.
    Reply
  • waltc3
    It's a value CPU now taking AMD's former position in pricing and demand. How much blood can Intel get out of this 14nm turnip?...;)
    Reply
  • watzupken
    To be honest, the power consumption of the chip should not come as a shocker for anyone. I believe Intel have already listed the PL2 power @ 250W, which I feel is a conservative number and there may be instances where it may draw more. It will however become an attractive option for those who are tired of waiting for Zen 3 chips due to inavailability. Its been 3 months since the launch of Zen 3, and supply is still really bad. For those willing to wait, I feel Rocket Lake is not worth the upgrade because before its launched, Intel have already made it obsolete by announcing a Q3 release of Alder Lake.
    Reply
  • VforV
    watzupken said:
    Its been 3 months since the launch of Zen 3, and supply is still really bad. For those willing to wait, I feel Rocket Lake is not worth the upgrade because before its launched, Intel have already made it obsolete by announcing a Q3 release of Alder Lake.
    US is not the entire world, so no, availability is not really bad at all in general, but only depending on the place. It's really not the case of RX 6000s GPUs where they are everywhere unavailable...

    Many countries in EU had Zen3 since day 1 and still have them in stock right now. At decent prices too.

    I do agree with the 2nd statement.
    Reply
  • Glock24
    watzupken said:
    To be honest, the power consumption of the chip should not come as a shocker for anyone. I believe Intel have already listed the PL2 power @ 250W, which I feel is a conservative number and there may be instances where it may draw more. It will however become an attractive option for those who are tired of waiting for Zen 3 chips due to inavailability. Its been 3 months since the launch of Zen 3, and supply is still really bad. For those willing to wait, I feel Rocket Lake is not worth the upgrade because before its launched, Intel have already made it obsolete by announcing a Q3 release of Alder Lake.

    The new Intel CPU are like the new P4 Prescott, very hot and power hungry with little performance gains.
    Reply
  • TerryLaze
    Keep in mind that this is the architecture that intel was ready to release against ZEN1, the 10nm node wasn't ready back then but this architecture was, put that into perspective when looking at these numbers.
    Reply
  • Ogotai
    Glock24 said:
    The new Intel CPU are like the new P4 Prescott, very hot and power hungry with little performance gains.
    not according to the intel shills everywhere.

    TerryLaze said:
    Keep in mind that this is the architecture that intel was ready to release against ZEN1, the 10nm node wasn't ready back then but this architecture was, put that into perspective when looking at these numbers.
    keep in mind, that didnt happen now did it ? intel was too cocky too aggressive, to complacent, and lazy. put that into perspective when looking at these numbers. intel pretty much has a history of this, get on top, well a head of the competition, then falls asleep. only NOW are they actually getting off their butts and doing something.
    Reply
  • TerryLaze
    Ogotai said:
    intel pretty much has a history of this, get on top, well a head of the competition, then falls asleep. only NOW are they actually getting off their butts and doing something.
    Yes they get so far ahead that they have to stop for a few years to wait for AMD to catch up. You call it falling asleep they call it making twice the money with old tech they already have and that has already paid itself fully.
    Reply
  • Ogotai
    nope, as i said, intel was too cocky too aggressive, to complacent, and lazy.

    <Moderator edit for content>
    Reply