Raspberry Pi Pico powers open source smart watch

Raspberry Pi
(Image credit: Umut Sevdi)

The Raspberry Pi Pico, and subsequently the RP2040 microprocessor, have become popular choices for those in the cosplay community as well as makers looking to make wearable tech in general. Today we've got a really cool wearable to share created by maker and developer Umut Sevdi. Using our favorite microcontroller, Sevdi has created an open-source smartwatch called the WearPico.

Like most smartwatches, the WearPico is intended to work in tandem with a smartphone. It interacts with a mobile app and provides some features that work with the phone like managing calls and receiving notifications. It also has extra features, such as a stopwatch, notepad, and calendar. A full list of features is available in the project details at GitHub.

According to Sevdi, the WearPico doesn't have a full-on operating system as it's intended to work as an embedded device. The smartphone app that Sevdi created is Android-based. It communicates with the smartwatch wirelessly using Bluetooth, rather than Wi-Fi, so it uses less overall power.

The Pico works alongside a few other modules, including a 1.28-inch round touchscreen and  an MPU6050 accelerometer, and it relies on a 3.7v LiPo battery. The WearPico can be recharged using an Arduino TP4056 and uses a micro USB cable for power input. It's also fitted with a buzzer and motor that vibrates for notifications. The hardware is housed inside of a 3D-printed shell.

If you want to take a closer look at this Raspberry Pi project, check out the details over at GitHub. There, you can explore the source code that runs on the Pico, as well as more information about the Android mobile app. Sevdi was also kind enough to share demo videos of the watch in action. Be sure to follow Sevdi for more cool projects (as well as any future updates to this one). 

Ash Hill
Freelance News and Features Writer

Ash Hill is a Freelance News and Features Writer at Tom's Hardware US. She manages the Pi projects of the month and much of our daily Raspberry Pi reporting.