AOC G2460PF 24-inch 144Hz FreeSync Monitor Review

Viewing Angles, Uniformity, Latency & FreeSync

To learn how we measure screen uniformity, please click here.

At first glance this looks like a typical TN screen result. But if you look closely at the side view, detail in the darkest steps is clearer than what we’re used to seeing. Usually the bottom two or three steps are a single shade of black, but on the G2460PF, they still look different from one another. The reddish-green color shift is certainly obvious as is the light falloff, but detail retention means off-axis viewing won’t be too bad. From the top, however, there is almost no delineation between steps. Gamma accuracy has effectively been wiped out.

Screen Uniformity

Our sample shows reasonably good screen uniformity. There are no obvious hot spots, but the average measurement does slightly exceed 10%. Individual values show a bright area across the middle of the screen from left to right. It’s only visible in patterns if you look very hard. Color uniformity is excellent at an error level that cannot be seen by the naked eye. The 80% gray field shows a smooth tone from edge to edge.

Pixel Response & Input Lag

Please click here to read up on our pixel response and input lag testing procedures.

This is why TN screens are still around; speed is their best attribute. You won’t find faster IPS or VA panels at any price. While the performance gap has narrowed recently thanks to faster refresh rates, TN still has a slight edge and is much less expensive. While the G2460PF comes in last in the latency test, it’s competing against the fastest monitors we’ve tested. With scores like these, you won’t see any significant motion blur, and lag will be perceptibly non-existent.

Gaming With FreeSync

We started by testing the four overdrive settings with various BlurBusters motion patterns. Even on Strong, ghosting was only slightly visible. The G2460PF has one of the better implementations we’ve seen among fast refresh screens. Many monitors that venture to 144Hz and beyond cannot be used at their most extreme OD settings.

Thanks to the monitor’s FHD resolution, framerates are pretty much a non-issue. With relatively few pixels to move around we were able to max the detail in Tomb Raider, Battlefield 4, and even Far Cry 4; which amazed us by maintaining over 70fps at Ultra detail when played on our Radeon R9 285-equipped system. With this kind of performance available, the lower FreeSync limit of 35Hz just isn’t a factor. You’d have to reach further back in time when choosing a video card to actually need that feature.

Motion certainly takes a leap in quality thanks to the elimination of tearing, but what about ghosting? Many high-speed monitors can’t be used at their max overdrive settings because black and white outlines trail behind moving objects. And the artifact gets worse as detail and texture become more complex. The G2460PF has a superb implementation. We could see some ghosting in the Strong mode but only in things like leafy trees and grass. Simpler shapes like buildings and telephone poles didn’t have a problem no matter how quickly we moved the mouse. We still chose Medium because it was able to reduce motion blur significantly with no ghosting whatsoever.

When it comes to motion quality, this monitor gives nothing away to the more expensive screens we’ve tested. We doubt even the most serious gamers will be dissatisfied.

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11 comments
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  • sillynilly
    Good budget monitor - good review. Not my cup of tea as 1440 at 27" is my bare minimum these days (getting a 4K soon to match my 1080). I would shoot myself in my eyeballs if I had to go back to this, but for many 24" 1080 with FS makes good financial sense.
  • rwinches
    Wow! The same price as my AOC 1080 144 G2460PQU but with wide range Freesync. Amazing. I just bought my three less than a year ago - time to sell?
  • Gmaer987
    FYI I noticed that under Specifications you list the panel type as IPS but everywhere else you list it as TN
  • rhysiam
    This is really compelling option. I just put a sample build together with a full system (i3 and RX 470) including OS and this display for just over $850. Even with inflated prices on 470s at the moment, that would offer a solid gaming experience at an amazing price (considering display and OS included).
  • gaborbarla
    "Functionally, there is no difference between the two technologies until you start talking about low framerates."

    So basically what you are saying is that if you have a fast PC and a fast graphics card and aiming to go into the 144Hz+ territory then you don't need GSync. This is a 144Hz monitor after all and most people are expected to have awesome gear to drive screens at those Hz. I have a 144Hz 1440p 1ms Freesync monitor driven by a GTX 1080 and never seen tearing on it yet.
  • eklipz330
    time to sell my benq...
  • Yuka
    Ok, I just ordered one.

    The price and great Freesync range well worth it taking everything into account. Out of all the "high tier" gaming monitors, this one seems to be the one to beat in terms of value.

    Thanks for the review and confirmation on my suspicions on this monitor.

    One thing though, does it come with the DP cable?

    Cheers!
  • ceberle
    Yes, there is a DP cable included.
  • Yuka
    1025177 said:
    Yes, there is a DP cable included.


    Nice!

    Thanks for the information.
  • fr3nzy_
    why is the AOC G2460PQU more expensive without freesync? am i missing something here?
  • Slyons89
    This is a perfect second monitor to go next to my 27" 1440p. Especially that stand. I never see stands that offer so many adjustments, especially portrait mode, in this price range. My $400 Acer XG270HU has the crappiest stand in the world.