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AMD's Ryzen 5000 CPUs Get Major Price Cuts, Up to 25 Percent

Ryzen 9 5900X
Ryzen 9 5900X (Image credit: Shutterstock)

AMD's Ryzen 5000 (Vermeer) processors are two years old, but the Zen 3 chips are still among some of the best CPUs on the market. If you're looking for your next upgrade, U.S. retailers, including Amazon, Best Buy, Micro Center, and Newegg, are currently selling the Ryzen 5000 lineup at reduced prices.

The Ryzen 5000 price cuts are probably an answer to the recently released Intel 12th Generation Alder Lake product stack that has helped Intel recover market share in the Japanese and German markets. While Ryzen 5000 still dominates the list of best-selling processors on Amazon and Newegg, Alder Lake has been creeping up to the Zen 3 parts. For example, the Core i7-12700KF is the seventh best-selling chip on Amazon, whereas the Core i7-12700K is in the third spot on Newegg's charts. Moreover, it's that time of the year when retailers start making space for the next wave of processors.

AMD has already confirmed that Ryzen 7000 (Raphael), Ryzen 5000's successor, will hit the market in the second half of the year, so retailers have likely started to offload Ryzen 5000 parts. Ryzen 7000 lives on the completely new AM5 platform with PCIe 5.0 and DDR5 support. The transition to the AM5 socket means consumers will have to invest in a new motherboard, although the topic of the memory remains in the air. Intel's Alder Lake supports both DDR4 and DDR5 memory modules, but AMD hasn't confirmed if Ryzen 7000 will also have hybrid memory support.

AMD Ryzen 5000 Pricing

ProcessorAmazon PricingRCP (MSRP) Cores / ThreadsBase / Boost Clock (GHz)TDP (W)L3 Cache (MB)
Ryzen 9 5950X$599$79916 / 323.4 / 4.910564
Ryzen 9 5900X$448$54912 / 243.7 / 4.810564
Ryzen 7 5800X$349$4498 / 163.8 / 4.710532
Ryzen 5 5600X$234$2996 / 123.7 / 4.66532
Ryzen 7 5700G$294$3598 / 163.8 / 4.66516
Ryzen 5 5600G$218$2596 / 123.9 / 4.46516

The flagship Ryzen 9 5950X had debuted at $799, but it's now available on Amazon for $599.99, a sweet 25% in savings. If you don't need all the firepower, the Ryzen 9 5900X is currently selling for $448.99, $121 off Amazon's regular price.

Despite not receiving the love that it deserves, the Ryzen 7 5800X is a competent mainstream processor. While it usually goes for $449, Amazon has it up for sale at $349.95, making it 22% more friendly on your pocket. Although the Ryzen 5 5600X doesn't boast insane core counts, Zen 3 offers you the best bang for your buck. It's hard to ignore the chip at $234.99 since you'll be saving up to $74 off its retail price.

The Ryzen 7 5700G and Ryzen 5 5600G APUs also carry excellent discounts. For example, the Ryzen 7 5700G, which generally retails for $359, only costs $294.84 now, an 18% price reduction. Meanwhile, we usually find the Ryzen 5 5600G for $259, but it now has a new price tag of $218.98 for a 15% saving.

If you're lucky enough to live near a Micro Center, you can get AMD's Ryzen 5000 chips at even lower prices, such as the Ryzen 7 5800X for $299.99 or the Ryzen 7 5700G for $249.99.

Ryzen 9 5950X: was $799, now $599 at Amazon
The Ryzen 9 5950X is the flagship chip that leads AMD's Zen 3 army with 16 cores, 32 threads, and up to 64MB of L3 cache.

Ryzen 9 5900X: was $569.99, now $448.99 at Amazon
The Ryzen 9 5900X offers 12 cores, 24 threads, and the same 64MB L3 cache as the Ryzen 9 5950X.

Ryzen 7 5800X: was $449, now $349.95 at Amazon
The Ryzen 7 5800X is a formidable Zen 3 chip. It has eight cores, 16 threads with a 32MB cache.

Ryzen 5 5600X: was $309, now $234.99 at Amazon
The Ryzen 5 5600X offers the best value for your money. The Zen 3 part delivers six cores, 12 threads, and 32MB of L3 cache.

Ryzen 7 5700G: was $359, now $294.84 at Amazon
The Ryzen 7 5700G wields eight cores, 16 threads, and eight Vega CUs at 2,000 MHz.

Ryzen 5 5600G: was $259, now $218.98 at Amazon
The Ryzen 5 5600G has six cores, 12 threads, and 16MB of L3 cache at its disposal. The iGPU boasts seven Vega CUs that max out at 1,900 MHz.

Zhiye Liu
Zhiye Liu

Zhiye Liu is a Freelance News Writer at Tom’s Hardware US. Although he loves everything that’s hardware, he has a soft spot for CPUs, GPUs, and RAM.

  • mdd1963
    $100 off of both the 5800X and 5900X, and the 5950X is $200 off!

    Very nice!
    Reply
  • InvalidError
    Lack of meaningful competition allowed AMD to jack up prices for Zen 3. Now that Intel is back from its coma, AMD has to revisit its prices. Competition at work for a change.
    Reply
  • digitalgriffin
    Next gen Apu's will get ddr5 and rdna2 which will greatly improve speed. Rumor is zen 4 will have iGPU built in on most of its lineup. It will be interesting to see if they have a iGPU focused lineup if the dGPU shortage continues.

    A lot of zen 4's multi core improvements will be based upon keeping those cores fed with data. DDR4 support will likely hamper multi core performance significantly.

    If you have to buy a NEW system now, Alder lake is my rec. If you want to upgrade from anything previous AMD 5000 series with a 500 series motherboard, then buy an AMD 5000 series. Otherwise I would hold. Prices will continue to crash as their life is limited.
    Reply
  • King_V
    Yeah, this was inevitable when the reviews were putting the 5600X's performance about equal to the i5-12400.

    Bizarrely, I'm still seeing prices for the Ryzen 3000 series sometimes being equal to or higher than their 5000 successors. What the crap is the deal with that?
    Reply
  • watzupken
    InvalidError said:
    Lack of meaningful competition allowed AMD to jack up prices for Zen 3. Now that Intel is back from its coma, AMD has to revisit its prices. Competition at work for a change.
    This is always going to be the case no matter its AMD or Intel in the forefront. The one who dominates performance will dominate the pricing as well. Intel was the underdog at the start of 2021, which is why it made sense that they try to undermine competition by offering a lower price. If we see the same trend in the next generation CPUs, then chances that Intel won’t remain that generous like they have been doing in the past before AMD caught up with them.
    Reply
  • digitalgriffin
    watzupken said:
    This is always going to be the case no matter its AMD or Intel in the forefront. The one who dominates performance will dominate the pricing as well. Intel was the underdog at the start of 2021, which is why it made sense that they try to undermine competition by offering a lower price. If we see the same trend in the next generation CPUs, then chances that Intel won’t remain that generous like they have been doing in the past before AMD caught up with them.

    For people like us who helped save AMD from the ashes by buying Zen, it's more about Value. However AMD is no longer on the brink of bankruptcy and they are eyeing up much more profitable server market. At this price point it's not only about performance : price, but TCO, form factor, and reliability.

    But I will agree with you: Competition is a good thing, and future CPU prices will remain more in check for the DIY market as Intel and AMD leapfrog. Intel will become more expensive if they lead performance, but most of the home market still looks to value. So they can't get too egregiously out of line. Same with AMD.

    AMD's long term plane will likely 1) emphasize low power for laptops to maximize OEM orders. 2) Sell a small portion of desktop chips to enthusiast while 3) focusing on EPYC lower power/core + core count for big money.

    GPU allocation will be dependent on crypto prices. But AMD will without a doubt be asking for more money per GPU chipset. Performance : Price will stagnate initially. Long term will depend on how crypto goes ~six months out from launch. (This is when supply catches up with launch demand for non crypto based market. Maybe slightly longer as many standard market purchasers have balked at current gen pricing) This is the Kohl's pricing model. However for prices to stay high, ETH has to make a MASSIVE resurgence given the difficulty bomb in creating new keys. Validating keys will not be part of the money return stream with POS. Crypto demand is falling off a cliff and it has to stay that way, with ETH converting to POS and a difficulty bomb

    All this goes off the rails though if China invades Taiwan, which is a real possibility. Mark my words, China is watching very closely how we handle Ukraine. AMD better have contingency plans and mask ready to go for Samsung in SK.
    Reply
  • logainofhades
    King_V said:

    Bizarrely, I'm still seeing prices for the Ryzen 3000 series sometimes being equal to or higher than their 5000 successors. What the crap is the deal with that?


    Low supply probably.
    Reply
  • InvalidError
    logainofhades said:
    Low supply probably.
    Yup, happens with lots of out-of-production parts that are still in relatively high demand in the repair ecosystem, usually when companies need to keep systems running as-is because they had to fine-tune stuff for an exact specific system and doesn't want to have to troubleshoot all of the quirks that may appear using different hardware or go through the trouble of contacting support for every piece of node-locked software they use to get licenses migrated to new hardware.
    Reply
  • digitalgriffin
    InvalidError said:
    Yup, happens with lots of out-of-production parts that are still in relatively high demand in the repair ecosystem, usually when companies need to keep systems running as-is because they had to fine-tune stuff for an exact specific system and doesn't want to have to troubleshoot all of the quirks that may appear using different hardware or go through the trouble of contacting support for every piece of node-locked software they use to get licenses migrated to new hardware.

    A lot of code these days uses code like for license keys. Switch the CPU, you lose the serial #. There's also support for these functions in many javascript libraries. So in other words kiddies, don't use your computer for illegal activities. Eventually the CPU link will be made back to you.


    string cpuInfo = string.Empty;
    ManagementClass mc = new ManagementClass("win32_processor");
    ManagementObjectCollection moc = mc.GetInstances();

    foreach (ManagementObject mo in moc)
    {
    cpuInfo = mo.Properties.Value.ToString();
    break;
    }
    Reply
  • wifiburger
    these prices should of been day1 prices; now we have choice with Intel platform + upgrade path to 13th gen I doubt these will generate much interest

    old cpu, dead platform; if AMD really want to move stock I think they need to lower the price more

    5950x is the only one I'm interested in, maybe another 100$ off I will buy it
    Reply