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Beast Canyon NUCs Show Up on Retail Site

Intel NUC 11 Extreme (Beast Canyon)
Intel NUC 11 Extreme (Beast Canyon) (Image credit: Simply NUC)

After briefly teasing its NUC 11 Extreme (Beast Canyon) at Computex 2021, there is now more information about the new NUC kits on retailer listings from SimplyNUC. It also appeared on Intel's website. With the novelty that Beast Canyon now accepts the best graphics cards.

Beast Canyon, which will succeed Ghost Canyon, measures 357 x 189 x 120mm. It's essentially an 8-liter case, a departure from the previous 5-liter enclosures. The extra space is there so that Beast Canyon can house discrete graphics cards with a maximum length of up to 308.4mm (12 inches). The NUC supplies one PCIe 4.0 x16 expansion slot, though while there's enough headroom for a full-length graphics card, the NUC only sports a 650W 80Plus Gold ITX power supply.

That may not be sufficient to feed the more power-hungry graphics cards, though it's an upgrade over Ghost Canyon's modest 500W unit. On the other hand, the supported CPUs are all 65W or lower parts. That should leave enough headroom for even the most power hungry GPUs like the RTX 3090. The sensible approach would of course be to err on the side of caution and stick with slightly lower power GPUs like the RTX 3080 and RX 6800 XT — and don't get a model that comes with a big factory overclock.

Intel released Beast Canyon with three different 10nm processor options, living inside the NUC 11 Extreme Compute Element (Driver Bay). The NUC is available with the Core i9-11900KB, Core i7-11700B and Core i5-11400H. It's strange that Intel decided to choose two Tiger Lake desktop from the stack, while offering the third option with a mobile Tiger Lake-H part. The Core i9-11900KB and Core i7-11700B come with a 65W TDP (thermal desing power), and the Core i5-11400H operates within the 45W limit.

According to SimplyNUC's listing, the Core i9-11900KB and Core i7-11700B are 8-core chips and the Core i5-11400H checks in with six cores. All three processors feature Hyper-Threading technology. The Core i9-11900KB has the highest clock speeds with a 3.3 GHz base clock and 4.9 GHz boost clock. It's also the only chip with an unlocked multiplier for overclocking endeavors.

Intel NUC 11 Extreme Beast Canyon Specifications

ModelCompute ElementProcessorCores / ThreadsBase / Boost Clock Speeds (GHz)L3 Cache (MB)TDP (W)
NUC11BTMi9NUC11DBBi9Core i9-11900KB8 / 163.3 / 4.92465
NUC11BTMi7NUC11DBBi7Core i7-11700B8 / 163.2 / 4.82465
NUC11BTMi5NUC11DBBi5Core i5-11400H6 / 122.7 / 4.51245

Regardless of the processor model, Beast Canyon is connected to a WM590 chipset that's specifically designed for Tiger Lake. There's room for up to 64GB of DDR4-3200 1.2V SO-DIMM memory thanks to the two SO-DIMM memory slots. EEC memory modules aren't supported, though.

The Beast Canyon offers plenty of storage options as well. The NUC provides two SATA 6Gbps ports for old-school SSDs and hard drives, along with four high-speed storage M.2 slots. The two PCIe 4.0 x4 slots are connected directly to the Tiger Lake processor, while the other two PCIe 3.0 x4 slots go through the WM590 chipset. The M.2 slots support RAID 0 and RAID 1 arrays. A microSD card reader is present as well to read SDXC cards with up to UHS-II support.

Naturally, you'll want to pair Beast Canyon with a discrete graphics card, which is the whole point of the extra space. If not, you can always depend on Tiger Lake's Xe Graphics engine. In that case, you get access to two Thunderbolt 4 ports and one HDMI 2.0b port. There's one PCIe 4.0 x4 expansion slot for other add-in cards.

Beast Canyon is pretty generous with the USB 3.1 Gen 2 ports with six distributed at the back of rhe device and another two up front. You can further expand the number of USB ports through the two USB 3.1 headers or two USB 2.0 headers. The NUC comes with 2.5 Gigabit Ethernet networking, Wi-Fi 6E, and Bluetooth 5.2 connectivity.

Beast Canyon is up for pre-order at Simply NUC. The base configuration consists of 8GB (2x4GB) of memory and a 256GB NVMe M.2 SSD. The Core i9-11900KB and Core i7-11700B models start at $1,599 and $1,399, respectively, while the Core i5-11400H model starts at $1,299. Simply NUC will start shipping out orders in September.

  • excalibur1814
    Doesn't matter. In the UK, it's not easy to find the 11th gen standard NUCS, let alone the 2060 unit. That is, unless you're willing to be ripped off by simplynuc.
    Reply
  • pixelpusher220
    no USB-C? pictures would help...
    Reply
  • watzupken
    "That may not be sufficient to feed the more power-hungry graphics cards, though it's an upgrade over Ghost Canyon's modest 500W unit. On the other hand, the supported CPUs are all 65W or lower parts. "

    How sure are we that this is locked at 65W? Considering that we see 11800H drawing over 90W when boosting, I believe it is highly possible that Intel may allow for a higher PL2 on this NUC.
    Reply
  • escksu
    The price is ridiculous. 1500 for just 11900KB, 8GB RAM And 256GB SSD.....
    Reply
  • spongiemaster
    pixelpusher220 said:
    no USB-C? pictures would help...
    Read the article. 2 Thunderbolt 4 ports.
    Reply
  • spongiemaster
    watzupken said:
    "That may not be sufficient to feed the more power-hungry graphics cards, though it's an upgrade over Ghost Canyon's modest 500W unit. On the other hand, the supported CPUs are all 65W or lower parts. "

    How sure are we that this is locked at 65W? Considering that we see 11800H drawing over 90W when boosting, I believe it is highly possible that Intel may allow for a higher PL2 on this NUC.
    Assuming this is using a quality 650W, it is plenty for even a 3080Ti which is the highest TDP card you could fit in this. You're not going to get a 65w CPU plus the rest of the system up to 300W.
    Reply
  • Joseph_138
    Is there a big difference between the i9-11900KB and the i7-11700B? I'm not seeing anything in the chart to justify the price of the upgrade. Another 100mhz, but what's that really worth? $200? For real? I don't see the i9 as being a very good value. Even the i5 doesn't seem like much of a value, when the i7 is just $100 more with more cores/threads, and higher clocks. I think they'll sell a lot of i7's, the i5 and i9, not so much.
    Reply
  • Kamen Rider Blade
    I'm sorry, but Ghost Canyon was a far more Aesthetically pleasing NUC design with several fundamental flaws.

    This is several steps backwards in case design IMO, and all that ugly RGB rainbow puke with that tacky skull in the front.

    UGH
    Reply
  • excalibur1814
    Kamen Rider Blade said:
    I'm sorry, but Ghost Canyon was a far more Aesthetically pleasing NUC design with several fundamental flaws.

    This is several steps backwards in case design IMO, and all that ugly RGB rainbow puke with that tacky skull in the front.
    UGH

    True. The previous version looked really, really good.
    Reply
  • Kamen Rider Blade
    excalibur1814 said:
    True. The previous version looked really, really good.
    That's why I'm baffled as to why Intel wasted money on this tacky & ugly design.

    It's VASTLY inferior than Ghost Canyon.

    Ghost Canyon was onto something & Intel couldn't see it.
    Reply