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Ryzen 7 5800X3D Beats Core i9-12900KS By 16% In Shadow of the Tomb Raider

AMD Ryzen 7 5800X3D
AMD Ryzen 7 5800X3D (Image credit: XanxoGaming)

Update 4/8/2022 02:24 PT:

CapFrameX has tweeted "It was actually Ultra details and Ultra shadows to stress CPU/RAM. AF/AA/AO and post processing min." and we have updated the story to reflect this correction.

Original Article:

XanxoGaming released the first benchmarks for AMD’s upcoming Ryzen 7 5800X3D processor. The Peruvian news outlet followed up a quick gaming benchmark in Shadow of the Tomb Raider, where AMD’s L3 cache-heavy chip outperformed the Core i9-12900K and Core i9-12900KS.

XanxoGaming executed the benchmarks in conjunction with the developer of CapFrameX, a helpful tool to analyze frame times. The publication tested at a 720p (1280 x 720) resolution with ultra details and shadows to stress the CPU. It’s essential to consider that the Intel and AMD systems used different hardware, which XanxoGaming has admitted is not an apples-to-apples comparison.

The Core i9-12900K and Core i9-12900KS systems have a GeForce RTX 3090 Ti and DDR5-4800 C40 memory, whereas the Ryzen 7 5800X3D system was on a GeForce RTX 3080 Ti with DDR4-3200 C14 memory. So despite the Intel testbed having a better graphics card, the AMD system won by a fair margin, making the feat even more impressive.

The Ryzen 7 5800X3D delivered an average frame rate of 231 FPS, while the Core i9-12900K and Core i9-12900KS finished with 190 FPS and 200 FPS, respectively. Therefore, AMD’s chip beat the Core i9-12900K by 22% and the Core i9-12900KS by 16%. Furthermore, let’s look back at AMD’s Ryzen 7 5800X3D presentation. The chipmaker estimates that the processor offers up to 10% better gaming performance than the Core i9-12900K at 1080p (1920 x 1080) resolution with high image quality.

Shadow of the Tomb Raider is a title that relies heavily on memory speed and is sensitive to memory latency, which favors the Ryzen 7 5800X3D. It’s necessary to put the AMD chip through more titles to see whether it can be the “world’s fastest gaming CPU,” as AMD has been calling it. The Ryzen 7 5800X3D will hit the shelves on April 20 for $449. Therefore, we’re less than two weeks away from finding out whether AMD can take away the crown for the “fastest gaming CPU” from the Core i9-12900KS, which recently debuted at $799.99.

Zhiye Liu
Zhiye Liu

Zhiye Liu is a Freelance News Writer at Tom’s Hardware US. Although he loves everything that’s hardware, he has a soft spot for CPUs, GPUs, and RAM.

  • domih
    Dear Ladies and Gentlemen posters, I'm ready with the popcorn. 1,2, 3, get it on!
    Reply
  • drivinfast247
    Would be cool if it was true.
    Reply
  • blppt
    Even if it just matches the 12900KS, thats quite a feat for a CPU that will almost certainly consume significantly less energy.
    Reply
  • Alvar "Miles" Udell
    To bring back AMD's official announcement slide:

    Reply
  • watzupken
    I feel that title, “World’s fastest gaming processor” comes with a big caveat. That being that it is not consistent. In other words, it will be highly beneficial if the game can utilise the cache, or, highly sensitive to latencies. The fact that AMD only showcased 6 titles in their slide likely proves this point. I do wonder what will happen when the resolution is increased to 1440p though.

    At the end of the day, the reality is that Zen 3 is on its way out. So this being a stop gap solution to somewhat try and dull Intel Alder Lake’s advantage is only going to meet with very limited success. Furthermore, this chip is not exactly cheap. If it is not cheap and Zen 4 is just a couple of quarters away, then I see no reason to recommend buying it. If one is looking to upgrade from say Zen 1 or 1+, then there are cheaper Zen 3 alternatives which may not be as fast as the X3D in latency sensitive apps/ games, but will still provide good performance.
    Reply
  • exploding_psu
    I just realized how long the names of both CPU are. Someone like my dad would probably going to have a hard time remembering that mumbojumbo of alphanumeric model names
    Reply
  • 10tacle
    Meh. The days of "fastest gaming processor" bragging rights are numbered if not already dead. Nobody games at 720p anymore where the CPU shows and not the GPU. That's CPU bench only. And fewer and fewer of even the most competitive frame chasing gamers are still gaming at 1080p as they move up to faster higher resolution 2K and 4K VA panels with ever more powerful GPUs on tap. AMD vs. Intel will make zero difference in your gaming FPS with your shiny new for 2022 LG 42" C2 series 4K OLED.
    Reply
  • jacob249358
    Im honestly shocked but at the same time, who even cares? Like 10tacle said no one is actually going to make use of this because the people who can afford it are playing at 4k with their 3080 ti. No one who is just a 1080p gamer is going to get this. I think consumer-level CPUs are very ahead of game developers.
    Reply
  • Kamen Rider Blade
    10tacle said:
    Meh. The days of "fastest gaming processor" bragging rights are numbered if not already dead. Nobody games at 720p anymore where the CPU shows and not the GPU. That's CPU bench only. And fewer and fewer of even the most competitive frame chasing gamers are still gaming at 1080p as they move up to faster higher resolution 2K and 4K VA panels with ever more powerful GPUs on tap. AMD vs. Intel will make zero difference in your gaming FPS with your shiny new for 2022 LG 42" C2 series 4K OLED.
    Mobile Hand Helds like Steam Deck & Aya Neo are using 720p, so to say that "Nobody" is using it is disingenuous.

    But that's an entirely new genre of Portable PC gaming and doesn't affect this CPU.
    Reply
  • tennis2
    Dear Toms.
    Please include the i7-5775C in your benchmarks!!
    Reply