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ASMedia Developing 10 GB/s USB 3.5 Controllers

By - Source: DigiTimes | B 16 comments

ASMedia’s USB 3.5 controller chips will arrive in 2014 and offer speeds of up to 10 Gb/s.

According to company president Chewei Lin, ASMedia Technology is currently developing USB 3.5 host and device controller chips that will be available in 2014. These chips will offer speeds of up to 10 Gb/s at a much more affordable price than Intel’s Thunderbolt. Lin added that "USB 3.5 controller chips will have more opportunities in the market, especially for SSD applications."

Additionally, ASMedia’s 3rd Generation USB 3.0 to SATA ASM1153 chip has been officially verified by USB-IF. The company will begin delivering samples in Q3 2013 and will be manufactured by TSMC using an 85 nm process.

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  • 4 Hide
    win7guru , June 12, 2013 8:13 AM
    This is great news. I would hope it has backwards compatibility and they can deliver on speeds.
  • -1 Hide
    unknown9122 , June 12, 2013 8:19 AM
    Good stuff. Thunderbolt is the future. But the flatness of the USB port allows for thinner PCs. The thunderbolt port has more vertical length.
  • 5 Hide
    bison88 , June 12, 2013 8:27 AM
    Thunderbolt is hardly the future. It is no longer optical which makes it less different than USB. Not to mention Intel held back proper USB 3.0 support from the market intentionally for over 2 years in an effort to push Thunderbolt, their tech, as a "new" USB replacement that was unnecessary.
  • 7 Hide
    fairfox , June 12, 2013 8:42 AM
    10 GB/s ... 10 Gb/s......little more careful please !!!
  • -1 Hide
    dgingeri , June 12, 2013 8:50 AM
    Now if they can just make the UAS features standard on USB 3.5 and make it more efficient for storage, that would make it near equal to Thunderbolt. As it is, USB 3.0 only comes close to TB if UAS is used. USB 3.0 has too much baggage from 1.1 and 2.0 to be efficient enough for regular use.
  • 3 Hide
    WithoutWeakness , June 12, 2013 9:05 AM
    Quote:
    Good stuff. Thunderbolt is the future. But the flatness of the USB port allows for thinner PCs. The thunderbolt port has more vertical length.


    Thunderbolt is likely not the future. The concept of Thunderbolt (using external PCIe lanes) may be the future but Thunderbolt in its current iterations are certainly not. Thunderbolt hasn't become widely adopted because of the ubiquity of USB devices. If I buy an external hard drive I'm going to buy a USB 3.0 drive because I know I can plug it into any machine made in the last 15 years, even an old beige tower with USB 1.1 ports. Thunderbolt drives are only going to work on the newest and most expensive machines and offer minimal speed improvements over USB 3.0 for single drives. If a USB 3.5 solution can provide Thunderbolt-like speeds while still maintaining backwards compatibility with previous USB standards then it may be the better solution for users requiring faster external devices.
  • 1 Hide
    Vorador2 , June 12, 2013 9:15 AM
    Thunderbolt is too pricey, both chipsets and cables. It has it's advantages, but most people can do with usb 3.0 nicely.

    TB only shines where very high speed is critical, like external graphic cards.
  • 0 Hide
    josejones , June 12, 2013 9:15 AM
    god damn it, I hate posting at Tom's now - every post I make says "an error has occurred"
  • 0 Hide
    Grandmastersexsay , June 12, 2013 9:28 AM
    I am trying to understand the point of this. What kind of device will be able to take advantage of such speeds? The fastest SSDs can only do slightly bettet than 500 MB/s or 4 Gb/s. We probably won't see those kind of speeds on comercially available storage medium for 5-10 years. I suppose this could be used for video, but display port's bandwidth is nearly double this already at over 17 Gb/s.
  • 2 Hide
    edlivian , June 12, 2013 11:04 AM
    its game over for thunderbolt. Stupid prices, complete lack of products, hardly any market share.
  • -1 Hide
    jn77 , June 12, 2013 1:23 PM
    Thunderbolt will go like firewire, the problem is in real world bandwidth tests fireware always came close to spec where USB never even met spec, what ever the max spec has been. I would like to see a firewire 256,000 instead of firewire 1600.
  • 0 Hide
    danwat1234 , June 13, 2013 12:33 AM
    So will it be called USB3.5 or USB 3B?
  • 0 Hide
    velocityg4 , June 13, 2013 6:41 AM
    Quote:
    Quote:
    Good stuff. Thunderbolt is the future. But the flatness of the USB port allows for thinner PCs. The thunderbolt port has more vertical length.


    Thunderbolt is likely not the future. The concept of Thunderbolt (using external PCIe lanes) may be the future but Thunderbolt in its current iterations are certainly not. Thunderbolt hasn't become widely adopted because of the ubiquity of USB devices. If I buy an external hard drive I'm going to buy a USB 3.0 drive because I know I can plug it into any machine made in the last 15 years, even an old beige tower with USB 1.1 ports. Thunderbolt drives are only going to work on the newest and most expensive machines and offer minimal speed improvements over USB 3.0 for single drives. If a USB 3.5 solution can provide Thunderbolt-like speeds while still maintaining backwards compatibility with previous USB standards then it may be the better solution for users requiring faster external devices.


    Although the widespread use of USB is part of the equation. The bigger problem is that Thunderbolt cables and compatible products are so darn expensive. It seems to add $100 onto the USB counterpart for any peripheral. External docks and PCI-e enclosures costing more than really high end gaming motherboards. Small RAID enclosures running $700 or a whole lot more. Then add $50 a cable. It has priced itself out of the running.

    One of the most ridiculous points is the expensive cable needing chips at each end. They need to refine the technology so that regular chip free cables work.
  • 0 Hide
    Soda-88 , June 13, 2013 7:01 AM
    1.0, 1.1, 2.0, 3.0, 3.5

    Makes sense...
  • 0 Hide
    d3seeker , June 13, 2013 2:54 PM
    I certainly hope this improves the real world speeds seen by such devices
  • 0 Hide
    danwat1234 , June 14, 2013 5:46 PM
    Quote:
    I certainly hope this improves the real world speeds seen by such devices


    It won't help mechanical drives connected to USB3.5 because the mechanical drive itself it the bottleneck at something less than 200MB/s. SSDs on the other hand, sure. Hybrid drives may eventually be able to take advantage of it too