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Panram's DDR4 Memory Might Be Cheaper

By - Source: Tom's Hardware US | B 22 comments

Panram also introduces DDR4 memory modules.

We've already seen a lot of X99 motherboards and the three Haswell-E processors, but we haven't actually seen all that much DDR4 memory. Today there is a new contender: Panram. This company is launching its Ninja-V DDR4 memory modules, and while no pricing was specified, we do hope that it will be a little cheaper than competing kits.

The Ninja-V memory modules will only come in four versions – two frequencies and two capacities. The frequency options are 2133 MHz and 2400 MHz, with both available in 4 GB and 8 GB variants. Timings for the modules are CL15. Being DDR4, the operating voltage is also lower than DDR3, so they run at just 1.2 V.

Kit configurations will be available with either one or two modules of each capacity, making the kit capacities range from just 4 GB through 16 GB. For 32 GB of memory you'll have to buy two separate kits. Panram also indicated that kits will be available in white and black. Perhaps it's not so bad that kits only have up to two DIMMs; that way you'll be able to mix black and white heatsinks for fancy color effects.

Pricing is going to be open, which could mean anything. The conservative frequencies on these modules might point to a friendlier price tag than we've seen in other units. No word was given on availability, though we do expect the X99 motherboards, Haswell-E CPUs, and DDR4 memory to launch tomorrow.

Follow Niels Broekhuijsen @NBroekhuijsen. Follow us @tomshardware, on Facebook and on Google+.

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  • 5 Hide
    dovah-chan , August 28, 2014 12:08 PM
    Is Panram an EU brand? I've never seen them before here in the US. Neat looking modules I guess but really if you even have the option of getting DDR4 at this point you'll probably buy the high quality stuff.
  • 3 Hide
    dovah-chan , August 28, 2014 12:13 PM
    Turns out they're an asian OEM. Thanks google.
  • 0 Hide
    Amdlova , August 28, 2014 12:38 PM
    50us for 4gb DEAL TO ME!
  • Add your comment Display all 22 comments.
  • -1 Hide
    pierrerock , August 28, 2014 1:35 PM
    Am i the only one who thinks 2400 CL15 can't be better than DDR3 2400 CL10

    Here is an example : http://pcpartpicker.com/part/gskill-memory-f32400c10d8gzh

    So the only real advantage would be something like 2-3 Watt saved ? at 0.09 $/ Kilowatt-hour, this is not a big saving. (btw i am not sure for watt saved)
  • 0 Hide
    InvalidError , August 28, 2014 1:48 PM
    Quote:
    Am i the only one who thinks 2400 CL15 can't be better than DDR3 2400 CL10
    So the only real advantage would be something like 2-3 Watt saved ?

    The fastest DDR3 in the world does you no good if you want to build a system with an Haswell-E which only works with DDR4... if you want Haswell-E, you will need DDR4 no matter how much it may not seem to make sense at least for the time being.
  • 0 Hide
    SchizoFrog , August 28, 2014 1:50 PM
    DDR4 at DDR3 speeds, no wonder it is cheaper.
  • 2 Hide
    Chris Droste , August 28, 2014 1:57 PM
    pierre; right now top end DDR3 is going to be faster than early DDR4 because; Timings. right now this is only going to adopt power savings, and I've actually been curious personally why hasen't an OEM tried to do an X99/DDR3 board; much like the old days where you could get those boards that supported DDR1 and DDR2 on the same board, or simply supporting the older standard during this early phase. It's probably going to be late next year or even early 2016 before we see DDR4's bandwidth advantages outstripping Hot, O.C.'d DDR3 with Tight, sexy Timings. i wouldn't mind a budget X99-SLI board with only 4 DDR3 slots (2 on each side?) supporting up to 32GB of DDR3-3200(OC) to throw a 5820k on. it WOULD be kinda interesting to see what a 3 PCIe x9 (v3.0) slots would look like with a single PCIe 1x, hehe.
  • 6 Hide
    christinebcw , August 28, 2014 2:19 PM
    The industry can use some SERIOUS price reductions.
  • 1 Hide
    dschnoz , August 28, 2014 2:34 PM
    You're thinking of a time when the memory controller wasn't on chip. If Haswell-E doesnt support ddr3 then neither will any motherboard that supports Haswell-E.
  • 1 Hide
    dschnoz , August 28, 2014 2:34 PM
    You're thinking of a time when the memory controller wasn't on chip. If Haswell-E doesnt support ddr3 then neither will any motherboard that supports Haswell-E.
  • 0 Hide
    dovah-chan , August 28, 2014 2:48 PM
    Quote:
    pierre; right now top end DDR3 is going to be faster than early DDR4 because; Timings. right now this is only going to adopt power savings, and I've actually been curious personally why hasen't an OEM tried to do an X99/DDR3 board; much like the old days where you could get those boards that supported DDR1 and DDR2 on the same board, or simply supporting the older standard during this early phase. It's probably going to be late next year or even early 2016 before we see DDR4's bandwidth advantages outstripping Hot, O.C.'d DDR3 with Tight, sexy Timings. i wouldn't mind a budget X99-SLI board with only 4 DDR3 slots (2 on each side?) supporting up to 32GB of DDR3-3200(OC) to throw a 5820k on. it WOULD be kinda interesting to see what a 3 PCIe x9 (v3.0) slots would look like with a single PCIe 1x, hehe.


    I think it'll take even longer for wide market adoption. RAM is already extremely fast and it took about 2x longer for JEDEC to decide on the DDR4 standards than it did with DDR3. I think that DDR4 would be somewhat unnecessary if every company adopted the green's manufacturing process but it was a proprietary samsung method and very few DIMMs with the same chips as the green exist. If I remember right a pair of really high end trident ones might have had the same ones.

    I would say the method would be too expensive to reproduce but samsung sold the RAM dirt cheap so probably not, but you'd still need their expertise and fabs. Right now the RAM market is extremely bloated and stale so it's refreshing to see something new.
  • 0 Hide
    lp231 , August 28, 2014 3:23 PM
    Looked it up last time, at Newegg
    Crucial 16GB (4x4GB) DDR3 2400 for $239.99
  • 0 Hide
    junkeymonkey , August 28, 2014 3:40 PM
    Is Panram an EU brand? I've never seen them before here in the US. Neat looking modules I guess but really if you even have the option of getting DDR4 at this point you'll probably buy the high quality stuff.

    Turns out they're an asian OEM. Thanks google

    2012

    Milestone -Kingston becomes the single largest shareholder in Panram




    there home page also stated that Kingston was there biggest share holder and may still be so is it a Kingston kit is a rebranded panram??
  • 0 Hide
    dovah-chan , August 28, 2014 9:01 PM
    Shareholder does not necessarily equal ownership or even an influence in products. To me it seems that Kingston likely invests in other fabs to keep their position in the marketplace and take a small amount of profit from other companies revenue. If they were already a DRAM fab before Kingston even became a major shareholder then it's unlikely that they are rebrands.

    The DRAM market is a competitive place with brand name prominence being a huge factor rather performance. Of course quality control is another piece of the puzzle, but is a more hidden aspect of what equates to gaining market dominance. (much like PSUs in my eyes)
  • -2 Hide
    Alex Achour , August 28, 2014 9:11 PM
    ..."that way you'll be able to mix black and white heatsinks for fancy color effects." Black and white are not colors. Black and white are hues. So... "fancy hue effects" would make more sense. :-)
  • -1 Hide
    icemunk , August 29, 2014 3:52 AM
    Quote:
    The industry can use some SERIOUS price reductions.


    Dear god yes, it's absurd the RAM prices at the moment. I'm lucky I bought myself 32GB of DDR3 back a little over a year ago before the prices skyrocketed. I got all 32GB for $120 at the time.
  • 0 Hide
    christinebcw , August 29, 2014 6:02 AM
    I want 64Gb to be about $40. 8Tb drives about $100 - those really ARE massive mechanical marvels, after all. Get CPUs back into the Land of the Living, too. Then, even the crappiest OS won't stop custom-PC building to take off again, in a big way.

    And Alex, thanks for the great demonstration of smarts - HUES, YES!! Finally!!

    Of course, I thought the Zebra Mix possibilities were so that, when someone's driving these Panram-loaded PCs thru the Kalahari, many of these PCs could cluster together and make a run for it, confusing jackals, lions and cheetahs with the flashing HUES.
  • 0 Hide
    InvalidError , August 29, 2014 7:36 AM
    Quote:
    Dear god yes, it's absurd the RAM prices at the moment.

    DDR3 prices are pretty much where they need to be unless you want more memory manufacturers to go bankrupt from unsustainable low prices: every time DRAM prices have hit historic lows has been accompanied by one or more memory chip manufacturers going bankrupt before prices shot back up. There used to be over a dozen DRAM manufacturers with significant market shares 20 years ago but now, most DRAM chips are manufactured by only four players.

    If you think RAM is expensive now, wait until the next major manufacturer goes bankrupt or bails out of the DRAM business.

    $150 for 16GB is still a heck of a lot better deal than $300 for 256MB 15 years ago or $60 for 4MB 20 years ago.
  • 0 Hide
    christinebcw , August 29, 2014 8:15 AM
    Yes to all of that. However, the industry has been whining about flat or falling business. Why should they complain about not selling as much when they stick with 4-5 year old prices? The industry's customers were used to falling prices and improved technologies, and we really haven't seen major performance gains OR significant price drops except in 1Tb-and-smaller HDDs. And those are all competing against SSDs now, not among themselves.
  • 0 Hide
    InvalidError , August 29, 2014 8:53 AM
    Quote:
    Why should they complain about not selling as much when they stick with 4-5 year old prices?

    Why are they sticking to 4-5 years old prices? Because:
    1- they cannot manufacture entry-level DRAM chips and HDDs any cheaper than they already do if they want to maintain some degree of profitability so they can afford staying in business
    2- the technology itself has reached a point where further improvements require far greater engineering effort and costs so capacities, performance and costs are no longer progressing anywhere near as fast as they used to
    3- most of the market demand is met by entry-level components
    4- those same entry-level components are good enough for most people for 5+ years so replacement cycles are becoming longer across the board

    CPU prices have been largely stagnant with only incremental performance improvements for the past four years too. Same goes with nearly all other commodity/entry-level components: they are all pretty much as inexpensive as they can be without driving the manufacturers' out of business.

    Even on the SoC front that had exponential performance growth between the first smartphones and tablets until 2012 have already slowed down considerably. With 16nm chips coming out next year, there should be a lurch forward but after that, things will likely stagnate for another 3-4 years.

    The days of new products with compelling upgrade reasons nearly every (other) year are mostly over.
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