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AMD Introduces Radeon R9 Fury Series Graphics Cards With Fiji GPUs

Next to announcing its new 300-series GPUs, AMD also introduced not just one graphics product based on the new Fiji silicon, but four! Meet the Radeon R9 Fury X, the Radeon R9 Fury, the Radeon R9 nano and Project Quantum.

The Radeon R9 Fury X is the high-end solution, which packs 4096 GCN cores and 8.9 billion transistors. The Fury X is the water-cooled variant, while the Fury is only air-cooled. They feature 1.5x the performance per watt over the R9 290X, and heaps more performance.

The Radeon R9 Fury X's liquid cooler is capable of dissipating up to 500 W, but the board only has a TDP of 275 W. According to AMD, the 6-phase VRM circuitry is even able to provide up to 400 A of current, making this card "an overclocker's dream."

AMD did not reveal all that many details about the Radeon R9 Nano but did mention that it is six inches long (shorter than a Mini-ITX motherboard), packs notably more power than the R9 290X, and that it has twice the performance per watt.

To top off the new launch, Project Quantum takes the cake. It is AMD's own small-form factor gaming PC that features not one, but two Fiji GPUs. Again, AMD was a bit light on the details, but it did tell the audience that the bottom houses the computing power and processing, while the top half takes care of cooling. Presumably, liquid cooling is used.

The Radeon water-cooled R9 Fury X will cost $649 and will be available on June 24. The air-cooled R9 Fury will sell for $549 and be on shelves a couple of weeks later on July 14. AMD did not reveal what Project Quantum and the Radeon R9 Nano would cost but said they will be available in the fall and summer, respectively.

The new HBM memory from AMD takes a radically different approach to creating a memory subsystem for a graphics card, whereby rather than placing GDDR5 memory on the PCB around the GPU, it uses 3D stacked memory on a silicon interposer, which is placed on the same substrate as the GPU itself. The result is that the memory system takes up 94 percent less space, enabling the assembly of much smaller graphics cards with more power than before.

HBM memory is also much faster, with lower latency (due to being closer to the GPU) and much higher bandwidth. It may run at much lower frequencies, but rather than having a 256- or 512-bit memory interface, it runs over a 4096-bit interface. (Wide and slow wins the race.) You can read more about HBM memory here in our past coverage.

Of course, we're still short on many of the details. We don't know yet at what clock speeds the GPUs or memory run, or many other tech specs. Naturally, we can expect these details to be revealed soon, though.

Update, 6/23/15, 2:45am PT: dragonsqrrl and norseman4 informed us that we switched up the release time frames of the Radeon R9 Nano and Project Quantum. The Radeon R9 Nano will be launching this summer, with Project Quantum following in fall of 2015. The article has been corrected accordingly.  

Follow Niels Broekhuijsen @NBroekhuijsen. Follow us @tomshardware, on Facebook and on Google+.

  • jimmysmitty
    SO when will you have benchmarks up? I would assume sooner rather than later. Doubt an NDA could be up anymore since AMD just announced specs and pricing (well some specs anyways).
    Reply
  • de5_Roy
    ....1!
    darn, i was slow!

    i am still in shock from the R9 Nano's pic. surprised to see such a er.. firebreather in such a er.. laid back look. the cooling fan doesn't stand out either. nvidia's ITX cards have a real competition now, provided that amd keeps the monster under control. over all, nicely done, amd. i hope the reviews/IRL performance of these cards are as good.
    Reply
  • clonazepam
    SO when will you have benchmarks up? I would assume sooner rather than later. Doubt an NDA could be up anymore since AMD just announced specs and pricing (well some specs anyways).

    Too soon could mean beta drivers with unpatched software... hope they do it right.
    Reply
  • junkeymonkey
    I like that nano and its size .. beats he heck out of them 13'' monsters they were putting out - I just don't like the no dvi port .. at least NVidia cares enough to keep dvi-I no there cards and understands theres still folks that may require that

    like the cards over the 280x only came with dvi-d so they were a no sale as well

    thanks NVidia
    Reply
  • jimmysmitty
    16066388 said:
    SO when will you have benchmarks up? I would assume sooner rather than later. Doubt an NDA could be up anymore since AMD just announced specs and pricing (well some specs anyways).

    Too soon could mean beta drivers with unpatched software... hope they do it right.

    They probably will have to be beta drivers but I doubt AMD has been sitting on the drivers this whole time and not trying to get at least one WQHL out for them.

    16066404 said:
    I like that nano and its size .. beats he heck out of them 13'' monsters they were putting out - I just don't like the no dvi port .. at least NVidia cares enough to keep dvi-I no there cards and understands theres still folks that may require that

    like the cards over the 280x only came with dvi-d so they were a no sale as well

    thanks NVidia

    I doubt they will not include a DP to DVI adapter. As for if it is DVI-I or DVI-D I wouldn't know yet.
    Reply
  • Giroro
    Assuming the R9 nano is in the ~$300 price/performance range, that is the card I want. Too bad It won't come out until fall. I don't want to wait that long.

    And to the guy complaining about dvi... I suggest you upgrade your monitor.
    Reply
  • de5_Roy
    amd and AIB partners can stick a thin AIO CLC like corsair H50 on the fury non x and nano and go for even smaller occupied space.
    i hope HIS (or anyone else) makes an r9 nano based card cooled by a blower type (1.5 slot or dual slot height) cooler.
    so many possibilities.
    Reply
  • Giroro
    SO when will you have benchmarks up? I would assume sooner rather than later. Doubt an NDA could be up anymore since AMD just announced specs and pricing (well some specs anyways).

    Too soon could mean beta drivers with unpatched software... hope they do it right.

    I would be fine with AMD's claimed performance/marketing material ... just to give some context where they fit into the lineup (especially for their GDDR5 cards)
    Reply
  • junkeymonkey
    I still use a few crt monitors so vga and dvi-I is still needed thing is with NVidia its all plug and play for the money with amd its spend on the card and spend more to get it to support your needs ?? why would I do that ?? it spend on a card that's got me covered or on one that don't ?

    '' And to the guy complaining about dvi... I suggest you upgrade your monitor.''

    like I said why not buy the card that supports me ?? why pay 400$ for a card that does 1/2 of what I need then got to go buy more to support it when nvida for the same price does all I need for one price ?? silly boy
    Reply
  • TechyInAZ
    Looks good! Can't wait for benchmarks.
    Reply