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Intel's 8008 CPU Celebrates 40th Anniversary

The company's first 8-bit processor was built as a result of a contract with Computer Terminal Corporation (CTC), which intended to use the chip in the Datapoint 2200 terminal. Intel delivered late and missed performance goals, which caused CTC to use its own CPU. Intel, however, had a non-exclusivity agreement and was able to sell the CPU to other customers, including Seiko.

The processor achieved only moderate success, but enabled Intel to gain visibility in the chip market and use it as a technology and marketing foundation for the 8080 CPU in 1974, which was used in the famous Altair 8080, and especially the 8088 processor in 1979, which was the processor used in the first IBM-PC, the IBM 5150, in 1981.

The 8008 was manufactured in 10 μm, integrated 29,000 transistors, was available with clock speeds from 200 to 800 KHz and shipped between 1972 to 1983. The 8008 is also the origin of CP/M, the "Control Program for Microprocessors" operating system that was written specifically for this chip.

  • gilbertfh
    It is hard to believe that it was only 40 years ago this multi legged critter was crawling out of the primordial soup and doing less than a modern day calculator. I can't even imagine where it will be in 40 years more.
    Reply
  • trumpeter1994
    18 pins in all its glory
    Reply
  • Antimatter79
    Ahh, takes me back to the good old days, when you really had to know how to use a computer to do anything with it. Every kid that I knew that had a computer also was writing their own little programs out of the books that came with them, and most of us were only 7 to 9 years old. Moving from my first computer with the 8008 to the 8088 a few years later was a huge jump in performance and capability, and with that came my first memories of Sierra games, Falcon, Thexder, etc. Yep, the good ol' days.
    Reply
  • neiroatopelcc
    gilbertfhIt is hard to believe that it was only 40 years ago this multi legged critter was crawling out of the primordial soup and doing less than a modern day calculator. I can't even imagine where it will be in 40 years more.
    We haven't really gotten far. Our operating systems still take the same amount of time to boot, and people don't seem to have become more productive at work - they're merely required to do more stuff to complete the same task.

    Reply
  • gilbertfh
    neiroatopelccWe haven't really gotten far. Our operating systems still take the same amount of time to boot, and people don't seem to have become more productive at work - they're merely required to do more stuff to complete the same task.Good inputs but now people don't even have to be at work for it to get accomplished by computers and robots running on modern day chips. To go from nothing to near artificial intelligence that can drive cars, fly airplans and build future computers and other components with little to no input from a humans tells me we have made huge strides.
    Reply
  • neiroatopelcc
    ye but it hasn't improved anything much.

    My old accord from 1990 was a great car on the road. Rode really nice and everything was fine.
    Now my new car is one of those computerized things that makes beep noises when the road is cold and tells me when to change gear. But is it fun to drive ? no. It works for the primary purpose of getting me from a to b, but it's not a pleasant experience.
    Reply
  • jdamon113
    I remember when I first saw a screen with the blinking dos prompt. It was the first IBM- You could not imagine how large and heavy it was, at the time it was just all, and wow. I was very young so a 5000 dollar IBM was not way, but later I got a timex sinclair, I remember it took me half a day to program the code to enable more memory.
    The big white boxed of that day, not to many home built yet. But those days there was a certain beauty in the PC world, as small as it was, each maker has something different, now requardless the name on the side or even if you build it yourself. It’s all the same made in China Crap. I miss the, NEW and cool factor. It’s all buzz words now.

    Reply
  • monsta
    Skynet?
    Reply
  • rosen380
    Well, if you feel that way, you can buy a 1991 Accord on eBay for $700 right now... I'm sure you'll also save quite a bit on insurance :)
    Reply
  • drwho1
    Intel's 8008 CPU Celebrates 40th Anniversary...

    Where is my piece of that cake?...
    Reply