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Intel Employee Crows About Acquiring a Retail Arc A380 GPU

Gunnir Photon Arc A380
(Image credit: Intel Graphiics)

Intel's Graphics Marketing head, Ryan Shrout, has taken to Twitter to boast about getting his hands on a lesser spotted Arc A380 graphics card. It is striking that it has taken three weeks, since the China launch of the A380, for Intel Marketing in the U.S. to get hold of one of these retail card samples. However, it makes us feel less bad about not being able to source one for our labs so far.

In Shrout's Tweet, he commented that the Gunnir Photon Arc A380 isn't easy to get "locally," but anyone who does so is going to get a "solid value" graphics card for "mainstream 1080pMed gaming, DX12 Ultimate, AV1 HW encode." Shrout mentioned that the China sample was approximately $130 - $140, but U.S. partner retail pricing (and EMEA pricing) remains a mystery.

The video is worth a watch for those with any interest or hope for the future of Intel discrete GPUs. The video consists of a standard unboxing style presentation, with an overview of construction, ports, fans, power connector, backplate, etc.

(Image credit: Intel Graphiics)

Later, the camera pulls back to show that one of the Gunnir cards was running in the background as Shrout was talking, plugged into an open test-bed system. Panning to the PC screen, we see the test system was gaming in PUBG 1080p Medium quality – in spectate-mode as Shrout was busy with his unboxing video.

To wrap up the video, the Intel Graphics marketing exec reminded us that the A380 offers AV1 acceleration and DeepLink capabilities and is suitable for content creation – as well as being capable of "some impressive mainstream gaming to compete with the AMD and Nvidia offerings at the same price point."

While you wait for Tom's Hardware review verdict on the Arc A380, early reviews of Intel's first Arc desktop graphics card can give you a sneak peek of the graphics card's performance. Moreover, Intel recently shared its tests on the Arc A380's gaming performance, covering 17 titles (including PUBG).

We still don't have a date for Arc A380 availability in the Americas or EMEA. In the video, Shrout said higher-end cards would be out later this summer but didn't specify what SKUs he was talking about or where they would launch within that time frame.

Mark Tyson
Mark Tyson

Mark Tyson is a Freelance News Writer at Tom's Hardware US. He enjoys covering the full breadth of PC tech; from business and semiconductor design to products approaching the edge of reason.

  • InvalidError
    Considering how curious people were to find out how good/bad the A380 was going to be, I'm surprised so many major sites haven't managed to get one of these air-dropped to their reviewers yet.

    Intel's driver people must be paddling like mad trying to get drivers sorted out before the usual suspects inevitably get their hands on the hardware.
    Reply
  • tommo1982
    I'm surprised by the fact no review from China has been linked so far. That's even more concerning. I hope Intel cards are good value for money. Otherwise it's not going to live for long.
    Reply
  • InvalidError
    tommo1982 said:
    I hope Intel cards are good value for money. Otherwise it's not going to live for long.
    From the A380 numbers that have come out so far, it is barely keeping up with the RX6400. On the plus side, you do get 2GB extra VRAM and a full set of encode/decode capabilities which should make it the better deal as long as Intel's drivers get up to par soon enough.

    There is still lots of room in the currently overpriced market for Intel to launch something, it just need to be priced with performance and maturity. Intel's pricing should take a substantial hit from the maturity front.
    Reply
  • GenericUser
    On the bottom center of box it says "Into the Unknow".

    Is the typo intentional or is there something I'm not getting?
    Reply
  • Soaptrail
    InvalidError said:
    From the A380 numbers that have come out so far, it is barely keeping up with the RX6400. On the plus side, you do get 2GB extra VRAM and a full set of encode/decode capabilities which should make it the better deal as long as Intel's drivers get up to par soon enough.

    There is still lots of room in the currently overpriced market for Intel to launch something, it just need to be priced with performance and maturity. Intel's pricing should take a substantial hit from the maturity front.

    There is not a lot of room left for that PC with how huge that GPU is! Is that the same size as an Nvidia 3080?
    Reply
  • daworstplaya
    Wow the release is taking really long. Delay after delay. These GPUs might be DOA when they finally get here.
    Reply
  • ravewulf
    What I'd really like to have is a single slot GPU with AV1 decode for an HTPC build. Alas, I'll probably be waiting a while
    Reply
  • mdd1963
    Admin said:
    Intel employee Ryan Shrout has the Gunnir Photon A380 and demonstrated the GPU's prowess in PUBG at 1080p with medium settings.

    Intel Employee Crows About Acquiring a Retail Arc A380 GPU : Read more

    What screams 'brag-worthy' more than replicating a GX1050's performance... 5 years later!

    Stop the presses!
    Reply
  • saltweaver
    PUBG is hardly the benchmark. We needs GPU to run well next gen titles on 1080p medium.
    Reply
  • Eximo
    tommo1982 said:
    I'm surprised by the fact no review from China has been linked so far. That's even more concerning. I hope Intel cards are good value for money. Otherwise it's not going to live for long.

    The early reviews that came out were heavily focused on a few popular asian game titles. And then some reviews did come out with more global titles, but all in Chinese.

    https://cdn.wccftech.com/wp-content/uploads/2022/06/2022-06-22_11-40-56.png
    League of Legends, GTA 5, PUBG, Shadow of The Tomb Raider, Forza Horizon 5, and Red Dead Redemption 2
    Reply