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Raspberry Pi 2 Arrives At $35, Can Run Windows 10

The Raspberry Pi Foundation announced the release of the Raspberry Pi 2, the next generation of the popular tiny computer. A little bigger than its predecessors, the Pi 2 measures 85.60 mm x 56.5 mm and weighs 1.6 ounces, but the big changes are its processor and memory.

For the past two years, all current models of the Raspberry Pi used Broadcom's BCM2835 SoC coupled with an ARM11 processor running at 700 MHz. The Raspberry Pi 2 received an upgrade in both areas and now features Broadcom's latest SoC, the BCM2836, and the company replaced the ARM11 processor with a quad-core ARM Cortex-A7 processor running at 900 MHz, which it claims provides six times the performance compared to the ARM11. Memory has also been upgraded to a 1 GB LPDDR2 SDRAM.

With a more powerful processor, the Pi 2 can run Ubuntu, but it also has the ability to support Windows 10. The company has been working with Microsoft for the past six months to create a compatible version of the new operating system, and it will be free to Raspberry Pi makers.

Even with an upgraded processor and memory, the Pi 2 is still compatible with the original Pi. The form factors are identical, the layouts and inputs are still the same, and both boards can run on the 5V micro-USB power adapter. The Raspberry Pi 2 will cost you $35, the same price as the Model B+. While the Pi 1 features two models, the A+ and B+, the company stated it has no plans to release a Model A version of the Pi 2 before the end of the year.

Raspberry will continue to produce and support the Pi 1 models, but it's very clear that it's pushing old and new customers to the Pi 2, which should give a little more room for developers with a more powerful processor and more memory.

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  • Vlad Rose
    I am so glad now that I put off picking up a Raspberry Pie 1 for xmas :) I was afraid it wouldn't be powerful enough for my needs, but this one looks like it will handle the job perfectly.
    Reply
  • StarBound
    I looked away from RP because I needed something that could run windows but now that you can and it is still one of the smallest devices out there I might just look at it again.
    Reply
  • Super_Nova
    Very nice indeed:-)
    Reply
  • Vlad Rose
    15206638 said:
    I looked away from RP because I needed something that could run windows but now that you can and it is still one of the smallest devices out there I might just look at it again.

    It may be 'Windows', but not the same as the one running on your desktop. Still a different CPU architecture. Basically, it'll be the same as Windows RT and only apps written for it will work (think app store only).
    Reply
  • dstarr3
    WANT with a double-capital W.
    Reply
  • IInuyasha74
    I'm still not satisfied enough with the performance of these devices. Given they aren't tied to a battery and can even have active cooling, I feel that they should have at least Cortex-A9 processors with a graphics chip capable of 4k video playback. You can buy a $40 TV dongle that has a quad-core Cortex-A9 chip running at 1.6Ghz, and Mali-400MP4 running at 533Mhz, 2GB DDR3, and 8GB storage. All of which runs off USB power and can sit unnoticed behind your TV. Given that, I don't see the attraction for this.
    Reply
  • Vlad Rose
    15207979 said:
    I'm still not satisfied enough with the performance of these devices. Given they aren't tied to a battery and can even have active cooling, I feel that they should have at least Cortex-A9 processors with a graphics chip capable of 4k video playback. You can buy a $40 TV dongle that has a quad-core Cortex-A9 chip running at 1.6Ghz, and Mali-400MP4 running at 533Mhz, 2GB DDR3, and 8GB storage. All of which runs off USB power and can sit unnoticed behind your TV. Given that, I don't see the attraction for this.

    Which stick that is completely open to put an OS on? That may actually be a better option for me (planning on mainly putting retroarch on it and possibly Kodi/XBMC).
    Reply
  • It can run Ubuntu! Yeees!!
    Reply
  • xxsk8er101xx
    Nice I will definitely pick this up and starting building my robot army of Raspberry pi 2's.
    Reply
  • Reepca
    got a b+ for christmas. At the same time, my brother got one for me. We both wanted the same thing, and we both got it too early. ARMv7 means it can run ubuntu... man I would love that. Especially lubuntu, since it's meant for potatoes.

    Oh well. 1.0B+ should still be good enough for what we want to do.
    Reply