Skip to main content

Super Flower Reveals Its First Titanium Line, Plus A Digital PSU

Power supply and case maker, Super Flower, featured several new products at its booth during Computex 2015. For the first time ever the company revealed a full Titanium line, which consists of eight PSUs with capacities ranging from 550 W to 1600 W, covering all market segments. This is the first power supply company with a full portfolio of Titanium units, and we are anxious to start reviewing the lower capacity models, which will very likely be of interest to a great number of users.

Super Flower also made some changes to its new Gold series of PSUs; the units are now housed in smaller chassis. The company also introduced a new affordable line for inputs of 230 VAC with 80 Plus Silver efficiency. Super Flower's Leadex Silver series consists of six PSUs ranging from 450 W to 1000 W capacities, all of which are fully modular. According to Super Flower, the prices of Silver Leadex units will be highly competitive, which is sure to influence its competition to adjust their pricing schemes.

But the biggest surprise from Super Flower was the reveal of a digital unit with 1600 W capacity and 80 Plus Titanium efficiency, which proves that the company has been working on a digital platform for quite some time now. This is great news and we are looking forward to seeing a cutting edge platform from Super Flower soon. This is also good news for users; as more manufacturers adopt the use of digital circuits in their PSU designs, the more affordable these units will become. Not much information was revealed about this unit, so we will have to wait a little longer to learn more about it.

We also noticed several individually sleeved cable kits in various color combinations, which were inspired by the flags of several countries. This is a nice addition for enthusiast users and modders who want higher quality power cables for their Super Flower PSUs.

Follow us @tomshardware, on Facebook and on Google+.

  • Onus
    I'd like to see Titanium down to 450W, maybe even smaller, for the real mainstream market.
    Reply
  • damric
    I'd like to see Titanium down to 450W, maybe even smaller, for the real mainstream market.

    There is a lack of good quality affordable options sub-450W. The ones with good quality caps typically lack other features like modularity or even sleeved cables. I could settle with bronze at 300W but I'll be damned if I put some cheapo caps in my rig.
    Reply
  • Onus
    You might like this one; ribbons rather than sleeves, but still looks decent: http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16817151143
    Reply
  • damric
    15984363 said:
    You might like this one; ribbons rather than sleeves, but still looks decent: http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16817151143

    Nice! Even has a PCIE cable.
    Reply
  • dstarr3
    Well, there's nothing wrong with buying a 750W PSU for a computer that only needs 450W, aside from the possible extra cost. But consider that the premium of buying a quality product. Plus, a lot of PSUs have a silent, no-fan mode when below a certain threshold, so if you buy a much too powerful PSU for your system, odds are, the fan would never even switch on and you'd have a totally silent, well-built PSU that will last you for ages because it never gets stressed.
    Reply
  • damric
    15984387 said:
    Well, there's nothing wrong with buying a 750W PSU for a computer that only needs 450W, aside from the possible extra cost. But consider that the premium of buying a quality product. Plus, a lot of PSUs have a silent, no-fan mode when below a certain threshold, so if you buy a much too powerful PSU for your system, odds are, the fan would never even switch on and you'd have a totally silent, well-built PSU that will last you for ages because it never gets stressed.

    Yeah but I have PCs that only need like 150W like my i3-GTX 750 Ti rig, so it's like overkill the overkill.
    Reply
  • Vlad Rose
    15984387 said:
    Well, there's nothing wrong with buying a 750W PSU for a computer that only needs 450W, aside from the possible extra cost. But consider that the premium of buying a quality product. Plus, a lot of PSUs have a silent, no-fan mode when below a certain threshold, so if you buy a much too powerful PSU for your system, odds are, the fan would never even switch on and you'd have a totally silent, well-built PSU that will last you for ages because it never gets stressed.

    Yeah but I have PCs that only need like 150W like my i3-GTX 750 Ti rig, so it's like overkill the overkill.

    Plus efficiency drops as well in that situation; although the only effect is a very slightly increased power bill (like in pennies)... lol
    Reply
  • TriBeard
    15984387 said:
    Well, there's nothing wrong with buying a 750W PSU for a computer that only needs 450W, aside from the possible extra cost. But consider that the premium of buying a quality product. Plus, a lot of PSUs have a silent, no-fan mode when below a certain threshold, so if you buy a much too powerful PSU for your system, odds are, the fan would never even switch on and you'd have a totally silent, well-built PSU that will last you for ages because it never gets stressed.

    Yeah but I have PCs that only need like 150W like my i3-GTX 750 Ti rig, so it's like overkill the overkill.

    Plus efficiency drops as well in that situation; although the only effect is a very slightly increased power bill (like in pennies)... lol

    That's one thing I'll never understand. People the are like, my computer uses 350w, so I'm going to get a 400w PSU that's super efficient (and expensive). I'd rather buy a good 600+ watt unit and have some room to grow. Screw a slight loss of efficiency.
    Reply
  • MasterMace
    pricing is very important. if this is overpriced, it'll just be niche.
    Reply
  • skipperkins
    You might like this one; ribbons rather than sleeves, but still looks decent: http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16817151143
    I'd like to see Titanium down to 450W, maybe even smaller, for the real mainstream market.

    There is a lack of good quality affordable options sub-450W. The ones with good quality caps typically lack other features like modularity or even sleeved cables. I could settle with bronze at 300W but I'll be damned if I put some cheapo caps in my rig.

    Enermax makes some really high-end fanless PSUs around 450W, but they cost as much as a nice 650W. In general, the high-end 450W Seasonic platinum or Enermax platinum modular power supplies end up costing so much you are better off just looking for a deal on a larger one.
    Reply