Windows 7 Team Improves Speed of Start Button

With the huge pool of Windows 7 beta testers thanks to the publicly released build 7000, Microsoft has been tracking various performance measures and the progress its made in the latest versions.

One such metric that Microsoft is tracking is the time it takes between the click of the start button and the appearance of the menu, which is measured in milliseconds. The Windows 7 team posted two graphs showing the improvement since the beta.

Start Menu Open Times for Windows 7 Build 7000 (Beta)Start Menu Open Times for Windows 7 Build 7000 (Beta)Start Menu Open Times for Windows 7 Build 7033Start Menu Open Times for Windows 7 Build 7033“Some caveats first—the sample sizes are different (after all Beta did go to a far wider audience) and these numbers shouldn’t be taken too literally since they really do just represent a snapshot,” explained program manager Chaitanya Sareen in the Windows 7 blog.

“The different colors denote performance against the ‘interaction class’—the acceptable experience range defined by each feature team. In this case we want the Start Menu to appear within 50ms to 100ms,” Sareen explained. “A trace capturing tool running on each machine lets us investigate and fix what may be impacting performance.

“The charts shows in Beta 85% of interactions were within the acceptable range (i.e. green or yellow, but not red). After examining the traces and making some optimizations, we find 92% of interactions are this range for a more recent build.”

Last week, we went over a few of the more notable changes to the Windows 7 taskbar that we thought to be the most useful.

Although Microsoft isn’t sharing when we might see a new version of Windows 7 released to testers, the rumors are pointing to April 10 as the target date for the Release Candidate.

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  • E7130
    jsloanjoy, i still think windows xp is better and windows 7 is nothing but microsoft's effort to put lipstick on vista pig and shake us all for more money because their stock price has fallen off the cliff since it's high.


    Stop your trolling, you post the same crap on every Windows 7 article. We get it, you will be sticking with an aging OS.
  • Other Comments
  • jsloan
    joy, i still think windows xp is better and windows 7 is nothing but microsoft's effort to put lipstick on vista pig and shake us all for more money because their stock price has fallen off the cliff since it's high.
  • E7130
    jsloanjoy, i still think windows xp is better and windows 7 is nothing but microsoft's effort to put lipstick on vista pig and shake us all for more money because their stock price has fallen off the cliff since it's high.


    Stop your trolling, you post the same crap on every Windows 7 article. We get it, you will be sticking with an aging OS.
  • A Stoner
    It is good that they are doing such detailed investigations and fixes. Here is hoping that UAC gets a bit more of this, such as a more intelligent version of UAC that is directly linked to anti-virus software. The truth is that UAC is a worthless device with the exception of self propogating virus's that somehow lauch themselves silently. When you click something and want it to run, that little reminder is just going to be clicked yes every time. Thus, unless windows comes back and says that the file is a virus, everyone just clicks yes.

    Current UAC

    Are you sure you want to run program you downloaded from internet?
    Yes
    Are you sure you want to run program that is unsigned/signed?
    Yes
    Program wants to make changes to your system, do you want to allow it access?
    Yes
    Program wants access to the internet, Allow once, always allow, block?
    always allow

    There is no ability to make that file permanantly click and use. First, through infinity times you click that file it goes through the same
    UAC steps, and the only part that is not is the access to internet. Thus UAC is a constant nag that never learns a thing.

    What I think a good UAC would be like.

    Windows recognises that actual mouse hardware clicks were used to click the download file as well as to initialize the start of said file and then refers to anti-virus software to see if any action needs to take place.

    No virus, no popup.
    Virus, popup.

    While not perfect, there are also heuristic virus scans that look for virus type activities of files to decide if there is a new unbranded virus present.

    It can, as an option selected by user in settings, warn that a file is an installation type as compared to a run type. Instead of saying system changes, it would say install software. Settings could even be setup to warn for specific system changes. Such as, adding files to start launch menu, or to registry, or any other bootup sequence database, giving some actual information to the user as to what the file is actually doing. Then I would actually welcome a popup. Once the popup is intialized the system should then allow the user to select check marks as to how to handle this file in the future.

    Here is another idea for a really good way to cut back on virus'. Have windows run a virtual version of itself during installations. Put an icon on the desktop or taskbar once the virtual installation is completed, the user then has a chance to verify that they like the installation and can click the taskbar icon to either have that virtualization deleted or appended to windows. Any virus would only be in a virtual windows that once shut down would be gone forever. So, as long as the virtual windows installation is secure from the actual windows, there would be no chance of a virus getting free because a click on the delete installation or a simple reboot would wipe the virtualized virus off the system.

    These things add actual security, give actual information to the user, and are valued added, as compared to what UAC does now, which is give every user a terrible spouse in the form of a computer that constantly nags you as to what you are doing.

    Cuddos for Microsoft working on the details, now to see them move that detail oriented thinking into where it is going to matter most for people who will not use Vista, because Windows 7 as it stands is just Vista with a couple curtains and blinds installed over the windows.