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Legos of the Fall: Most-Anticipated Sets for the Rest of 2018

More fun than a CPU upgrade

Even if you design your own PC mods, there's nothing quite like the thrill of building an awesome Lego creation. And, if you have kids, working on Lego projects with them is a unique bonding experience that they'll remember for a lifetime.

Lego has a number of new sets coming out in the next few months. Most will be out in August, which will make them hot items this holiday season (and before). Here are our favorites.

App-Controlled Batmobile ($99)

There have been many Lego Batmobiles, but you haven't been able to drive them . . . until now. Due out in August for $99, the App-Controlled Batmobile not only operates as a remote-control car that can perform stunts, but will also allow you to program it after an app update later in the year.

The block-based coding mode will use the same dead-simple programming language as Lego Boost, which is so easy to use that kids who haven't learned to read yet can use it. You can also customize the Android or iOS app interface you use to steer the car.

Lego City Cargo Train ($229)

This detailed set puts traditional model trains to shame. A motorized remote control lets you drive the four-car train around a track that you can customize. It also comes with service vehicles, a control tower and six minifigs.

Lego Creator Expert Roller Coaster ($379)

Available in June for $379, this 4,124-piece set gives you all the pieces to create a working roller coaster in your living room. The set comes complete with a huge track, a ticket booth and 11 minifigs, including two ride attendants and a cotton candy vendor. There are two trains with three cars each.

Best of all, when you pair the Expert Roller Coaster Set with your Lego Boost or a Lego Power Functions motor, you can motorize the trains, add sound effects or take advantage of the Boost's motion sensor.

Ninjago Stormbringer ($39.99)

If you have a Lego Boost set, you're going to want one of these. First shown at Toy Fair 2018 and due out this summer, this Ninjago set has a dragon you can move and program using the motors from Boost.

Lego Arctic Mobile Exploration Base ($119)

Adults of a certain age will look at this set and expect to see one of the minifigs turn into the Thing, but this mobile exploration base isn't based on any movies or books. It's part of a series of arctic exploration-themed Legos and includes several vehicles, six minifigs and a woolly mammoth encased in ice. Of course, it could just be a shape-shifting alien pretending to be a frozen woolly mammoth, but that's up to you.

Snoke's Throne Room ($69.99)

Recreate the best scene from Star Wars Episode VIII: The Last Jedi. This set includes the throne room where Rey, Snoke, Kylo Ren and several praetorian guards had their showdown along with minifigs of all the relevant characters.

Ninjago City Docks ($229)

If you liked the Ninjago movie, you'll love this 3,553 piece set which comes with over a dozen minifigs. Lego is also releasing a number of new products based on the latest season of the Ninjago: Masters of Spinjitsu show.

Lego Mobile Stunt Show ($49.99)

Hold tractor pulls on your carpet. An attractive, mid-size set, the Mobile Stunt Show features a flat-bed truck, two minifigs and a monster truck.

Lego Passenger Train ($159)

The Passenger Train offers similar features to the Cargo Train, but with fewer pieces and a slightly-different aesthetic. It has the same remote control and customizable track, but with three cars and half a dozen minifigs. You can control it with the bundled remote.

X-Wing Fighter ($79.99)

Who doesn't want to have an X-Wing on the mantle? This starfighter comes with 731 pieces and four minifgs, including R2-D2 and Luke Skywalker in his flight suit.

  • bit_user
    What does this even have to do with tech? This site is about computing - not modern lifestyle, like TomsGuide.
    Reply
  • geekinchief
    Thanks for the feedback. We define Tom's Hardware as a site for tech enthusiasts, many of whom like to build things other than PCs and / or share those experiences with their kids. In the weeks ahead, you'll be seeing more content that appeals to makers and to parents.

    Many of the projects on here are tech-related (for example, the Lego Batmobile is programmable). We're trying to reach out to people with new types of content and see how this goes. One of our new core values is "fun." If we see people aren't reading stories about a new we're trying, we'll adjust accordingly.
    Reply
  • bit_user
    20985699 said:
    Thanks for the feedback. We define Tom's Hardware as a site for tech enthusiasts, many of whom like to build things other than PCs and / or share those experiences with their kids. In the weeks ahead, you'll be seeing more content that appeals to makers and to parents.
    In the weeks ahead, I might stop following this site. Anandtech has a broader computing focus, anyhow. I never could get Toms even to review any of the growing trend of SFF PCs based on Celerons or Pentium Silver. Some of those could be good HTPCs or for home automation. It's like Toms Hardware has no interest in anything besides gaming (and mining) PCs, these days.

    I have also suggested adding some coverage of home servers. That's a whole DIY area that's been completely neglected by this site, for years.

    And I can't remember the last time I saw any reviews of wi fi routers, on here. That's some information I could actually use right now, in fact.

    20985699 said:
    Many of the projects on here are tech-related (for example, the Lego Batmobile is programmable).
    My only complaint about that was you barely scratched the tech aspects. The article was free of any specifications & details not available on their website. There are moders and probably a few hackers on this site who might like to know what's under the hood.
    Reply
  • bit_user
    Speaking of neglected areas, what about the charts?

    If someone has CPU or GPU X and wants to know whether it's worth upgrading to Y, the Charts were great for that.
    Reply
  • geekinchief
    Good point. Working on revising the hierarchy pages and doing new articles on when to upgrade.
    Reply
  • Blytz
    "There's a model drone that doesn't actually fly."

    yet...
    Reply
  • oneblackened
    Yeah why on earth is this on Tom's Hardware?
    Reply
  • Zaporro
    What the frik Tom's Hardware?

    First idiot "guides" like "how do i create partition", "how do i connect monitor", "how do i PC" and now article's completely unrelated to computer hardware?

    When you gonna change the misleading "For the Hardcore PC Enthusiasts" into "Just another pseudo PC tech news site loaded with obnoxious ads that's about everything and nothing just to rack up views and funds for country restricted giveaways that you will never be allowed to participate in"?
    Reply
  • bloodroses
    Personally, I enjoyed the article.

    For those that want articles related to just PC stuff, here ya go! :)

    http://www.instructables.com/id/How-to-Build-a-Lego-Computer/
    Reply
  • Jake Hall
    What the hell?
    Reply