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AMD Ryzen 9 3900XT, Ryzen 7 3800XT and Ryzen 5 3600XT Review: Small Gains, Big Price Tag

Ryzen XT underwhelms

AMD Ryzen 9 3900XT, AMD Ryzen 7 3800XT and AMD Ryzen 5 3600XT
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The TLDR

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The charts above provide the geometric mean of several of our application tests (listed in the chart title) that are representative of broader trends in lightly- and multi-threaded applications. Notably, these charts don't include the workstation-class application tests on the following page. You'll see more meaningful performance improvements there. 

We included all of our standard application testing below. Given the small performance deltas between the XT- and X-series, aside from identifying notable outliers, we won't provide too much commentary in the individual results - some of them even fall within the margin of error. 

Rendering on AMD Ryzen 9 3900XT

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We don't see much of a gain for the Ryzen 9 3900XT in the threaded Cinebench workload, but that's expected because the all-core load triggers the socket power limits. However, removing those limits via the PBO feature also yields similar performance to the Ryzen 9 3900X. The Ryzen 7 3800XT gains a mere 1% over the X-series model, while the Ryzen 5 3600XT gains nearly 4%. 

The XT-series' also notches gains in the single-core test, with the 3900XT, 3800XT, and 3600XT improving by 2%, 3%, and 5%, respectively, though the first two aren't quite as impressive given the benchmark's margin of error. 

A similar tale plays out through the rest of the rendering tests, with the Ryzen 5 3600XT posting the most substantial gains. Meanwhile, the 3900XT and 3800XT eke out small but measurable and repeatable gains.

Encoding on AMD Ryzen 9 3900XT

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The single-threaded LAME and FLAC encoding tests respond well to per-core performance, which benefits Intel's chips. AMD has shortened the gap between it and the Intel competition in these tests, but the overall performance hierarchy remains unchanged. 

The threaded HandBrake x264 and x265 tests show the same general trend - some slight gains for the Ryzen 9 3900XT and 3800XT, though it's noteworthy that the 3800XT passes the 10700K in the x264 render test. 

Web Browsing on AMD Ryzen 9 3900XT

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Single-threaded performance reigns supreme in most web browsers. The Ryzen 7 3800XT and Ryzen 5 3600XT take impressive steps forward over the X-series models, but improvements are more muted with the Ryzen 9 3900XT, even falling within the margin of error in a few tests.  

Office and Productivity on AMD Ryzen 9 3900XT

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Clock rates benefit the majority of the GIMP image processing and Microsoft Office tests, both of which benefit from the faster clock rates that come with the Ryzen XT series. 

Compression and AVX on AMD Ryzen 9 3900XT

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The 7zip and Zlib compression/decompression benchmarks rely heavily upon threading and work directly from system memory, thus avoiding the traditional storage bottleneck in these types of tasks. As we've come to expect, the Ryzen processors dominate in 7zip compression tasks, but the performance hierarchy is largely unchanged.  

Overall we don't see any big changes in these benchmarks, either, though we had more luck the Adobe suite on the following page. 

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Paul Alcorn

Paul Alcorn is the Deputy Managing Editor for Tom's Hardware US. He writes news and reviews on CPUs, storage and enterprise hardware.