Corsair SF750 PSU Review: A Tiny Power Factory

Bottom Line

It is impressive to see such a small PSU delivering 750W of power. The Corsair SF750 also achieves top performance in all areas, with the only exception being the hold-up time. Most importantly, it manages to keep its output noise low even under tough conditions.

Corsair along with Great Wall, the manufacturer of all SF models, did a great job once again managing to raise the bar in the SFX category. I can't help but wonder who will be able to surpass the SF750's performance, while maintaining the same power density. There are platforms that can deliver high power levels while keeping the same compact dimensions, for example the SilverStone SX700-G which was able to deliver more than 1kW of power before shutting down, but it is very hard to achieve the same high performance that the SF750 provides in load regulation, ripple suppression and transient response.

If this unit had a longer hold-up time, it would meet eye-to-eye with the SF600 Platinum's overall performance. However this is not the case so the Corsair SF750 currently ranks second in my performance charts, with its lower capacity sibling holding the crown. Nonetheless, pushing so many Watts out of such a small PCB is tough and some compromises have to be made. Because it can perform this well in this form factor, the SF750 is an impressive engineering feat. Years ago I wouldn't even dare to imagine such a strong SFX unit.

If you need 750 watts out of a compact PSU and on top of that you want two EPS connectors, the SF750 is your best choice. The second strongest SFX unit, the SilverStone SX700-G has the same amount of PCIe connectors (four), but it comes with a single EPS connector meaning that it cannot support mainboards with increased CPU power requirements. The same goes of course for the SF600 Platinum which has a single EPS and on top of that, it cannot support two high-end graphics cards since it only comes with two PCIe connectors.

The Corsair SF750 has a stiff price, but it is powerful and one of the best SFX units available in the market today. Moreover, it is supported by a hefty seven-year warranty, which provides long peace of mind. I would like to see a longer hold-up time in the next revision, but I am not sure whether Great Wall will have an easy time installing a larger bulk cap to achieve this. Finally, the rifle bearing fan that it uses has been proved to be quite good so far, but in this price category I believe that Corsair should go with an even higher-quality FDB (or magnetic bearing) fan.

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Disclaimer: Aris Mpitziopoulos is Tom's Hardware's PSU reviewer. He is also the Chief Testing Engineer of Cybenetics, and developed the Cybenetics certification methodologies apart from his role on Tom's Hardware. Neither Tom's Hardware nor its parent company, Future PLC, are financially involved with Cybenetics. Aris does not perform the actual certifications for Cybenetics.