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EVGA Implements Queue-Based RTX 30-Series Ordering System

(Image credit: EVGA)

Even now that a few weeks have passed since the RTX 3080 and RTX 3090 launches, availability is still a huge issue. Per Nvidia's own admission, supply problems are likely to persist into 2021, and that isn't good news -- especially with the bots grabbing every purchase the moment cards are available. But, EVGA has come up with a creative workaround to give everyone a fair chance: classic british queueing.

Published by Jacob Freeman on EVGA's website is the following text:

        "We have made some changes to the checkout process for EVGA.com 30 Series orders. Now we are using a queue based notification system.
 
       To sign up, use the notification button on the product you would like to be notified for. For everyone who already used the notify button previously, you are already entered. Once product is available (and it is your turn to purchase), you will receive a secure email that will allow you to purchase the product that you received a notification for.
Please note that you have 5 hours to place your order, if your order is not complete within 5 hours, the product will be released back into queue system.
 
       Also note that your email address that was used for the notify system MUST MATCH an email that has a registered EVGA account, if an account is not available with that email, you will need to create one before you can purchase.
 
      Also note that this system will be available for US store first and evaluating for other regions."

EVGA's product management director, Jacob Freeman has also been actively keeping the community updated about RTX 30-series orders through their Twitter account, and credit where credit is due, they are doing a stellar job managing expectations. 

Of course, when you receive the email that it's your turn to order an RTX 30-series card, you still only have 5 hours to actually place the order -- so you better pray that it comes at a time when your boss isn't watching.

  • sizzling
    Shame it’s US only but good on EVGA for being proactive and raising the bar.
    Reply
  • Aaron44126
    This is great but they should raise the window to more like 12 hours... I can imagine people with busy work schedules, or maybe people who work odd hours and might be sleeping when the email arrives, will be a bit disgruntled if they miss it. :-\
    Reply
  • gdmaclew
    So what's to stop someone from creating 10 (or more) accounts and e-mail addresses and placing them into the queue? They should also screen on IP addresses. Not perfect but it adds another layer of validation.
    Reply
  • Endymio
    A better solution than Soviet-style bread lines: raise the card pricing so that demand and supply equalize.
    Reply
  • Bastard2k
    with my luck ill wake up in the morning to something like this: 7rdL5pKvsssView: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7rdL5pKvsss
    Reply
  • hypocrisyforever
    This is pretty awesome quite honestly. EVGA once again leading the pack on customer service. Also, to those complaining about the 5 hour window, remember, the typical window is less than two minutes with the current demand and bot competition. 5 hours sure beats 2 minutes.
    Reply
  • spongiemaster
    gdmaclew said:
    So what's to stop someone from creating 10 (or more) accounts and e-mail addresses and placing them into the queue? They should also screen on IP addresses. Not perfect but it adds another layer of validation.
    Account's require an address and a phone number. You're not going to be able to completely stop people from creating multiple accounts, but that should be enough to prevent people from setting up 10 or more.
    Reply
  • kal326
    gdmaclew said:
    So what's to stop someone from creating 10 (or more) accounts and e-mail addresses and placing them into the queue? They should also screen on IP addresses. Not perfect but it adds another layer of validation.
    Honestly nothing is going to stop them. There are enough free emails, SIP, and VPN options to take many spots in queue.
    However unless they line these all up at once they are going to trickle out over time with no time line of availability. Versus 10+ cards all at once to go list and try and sell off.

    Also if 5-10 new registrations/queue entries all hit in quick succession and are mostly idle with no other activity other than queue it gives EVGA time to scrutinize everyone waiting in line pre purchase.

    It’s not perfect, but it’s a start.
    Reply
  • saltyGoat11
    Endymio said:
    A better solution than Soviet-style bread lines: raise the card pricing so that demand and supply equalize.
    If someone still wonders why everybody dislikes rich people, just read above my comment...
    Reply
  • Endymio
    saltyGoat11 said:
    If someone still wonders why everybody dislikes rich people, just read above my comment...
    Well, having actually lived in a Soviet-bloc nation, I'm cognizant of the futility of what's being suggested here. Whenever prices aren't allowed to properly equalize, there will always be scalping. Always. Even Stalin couldn't stop scalping with lengthy prison sentences in Siberian gulags, and you think you're going to solve it with a queue and an address check? For every convoluted contortion you come up with, scalpers will find a way around -- a hundred ways around. You have a better chance of repealing the Law of Gravity than you do the Law of Supply and Demand. Why not learn from history, instead of repeating it?
    Reply