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Intel Tiger Lake-H Beats AMD Ryzen 4000 in Geekbench 5

Intel Tiger Lake Processors

Intel Tiger Lake Processors (Image credit: Intel)

There has been a lot of hype around Intel's upcoming 11th Generation Tiger Lake-H mobile chips, but few benchmark results to back up the excitement. That has changed since apparent Core i7-11370H (via Tum_Apisak) results emerged today in the Geekbench database to offer a sneak peek of what's to come.

The Core i7-11370H is indeed a mysterious processor. It's seemingly a quad-core chip with Hyper-Threading, which raises some alarms. Previous Core i7 H-series procesors typically come with six or eight cores. Geekbench 5 picked up the Core i7-11370H as a Tiger Lake-U processor, conveying that the quad-core processor could be a U-series part with a more generous thermal envelope and consequently, improved clock speeds.

Similar to other Tiger Lake-U Core i7 models, the Core i7-11370H reportedly has 12MB of L3 cache at its disposal. This particular model seems to run with a 3.29 GHz base clock and 4.79 GHz boost clock. If we round up, the clock speeds should be 3.3 GHz and 4.8 GHz, respectively.

Intel 11th Gen Tiger Lake-H Specifications

ProcessorCores / ThreadsBase / Boost Clocks (GHz)L3 Cache (MB)TDP (W)
Core i7-11370H*4 / 83.3 / 4.812?
Ryzen 5 4600H6 / 123.0 / 4.0845

*Specifications are unconfirmed.

Since AMD doesn't have any quad-core Ryzen 4000 (codename Renoir) chips in its product stack, the Core i7-11370H would likely have to compete with the hexa-core Ryzen 5 4600H. AMD's chip flexes six Zen 2 cores with simultaneous multithreading (SMT), 8MB of L3 cache and base and boost clock speeds up to 3 GHz and 4 GHz, respectively.

It's apparent that the Ryzen 5 4600H has a two-core advantage over the Core i7-11370H. However, the Intel part does have a 10% and 20% higher base and boost clocks, respectively. 

Furthermore, the Core i7-11370H is based on the Willow Cove microarchitecture with a dual ring bus hence the quad-core processor shouldn't be underestimated. Bear in mind that Intel has said in the past that the chipmaker tuned Tiger Lake processors for high clock speeds at lower power consumption, and it shows with the Core i7-11370H. The processor's 4.8 GHz boost clock is higher than any previous Ice Lake chip.

Intel Core i7-11370H (Image credit: Primate Labs Inc.)

The Core i7-11370H scored 1,420 points in the single-core test and 4,964 points in the multi-core test. At the time of writing, the Geekbench 5 database shows the Ryzen 5 4600H with an average single-and multil-core scores of 980 points and 4,808 points, respectively. Therefore, the Core i7-11370H delivered up to 44.9% higher single-core performance than the Ryzen 5 4600H.

The multi-core performance between the two rivals isn't huge, and it's a great achievement for the Core i7-11370H, considering that it has two fewer cores. Despite the handicap, the Core i7-11370H provided up to 3.2 percent higher multi-core performance than the Ryzen 5 4600H.

Geekbench 5 is just one benchmark, and not the preferred tool to assess processor performance for many enthusiasts, us included. At least for today, the Core i7-11370H is the winner. We'll have to wait and see whether the performance dominance translates over to other workloads and gaming. Sadly, we don't know when that will be since Intel has kept a tight lip on Tiger Lake-H.

  • pacdrum_88
    This article is poorly researched. The numbers used for the Ryzen 4600H Geekbench score is disingenuous at best. A quick search reveals the processor scores far higher when paired with the proper memory. With a computer configured properly, the 4600H scores over 1,100 in single threaded and between 5,500 and 6,000 in multi-threaded. Besides that, if you're going to compare processors, the Ryzen 7 4800H, which is still cheaper than an i7, would be a better comparison. When configured properly, it scores over 1,200 in single threaded and over 8,000 in multi-threaded.

    Intel currently wins in single threaded, until Zen 3 launches. However, Intel is getting crushed in multi-threaded and will continue to for the foreseeable future.

    Just for kicks, I ran Geekbench 5 on my Dell Inspiron 5505 with a Rzyen 7 4700U. Far cheaper than any computer running an Intel Core i7, and even cheaper than most computers running an i5. Over 1,150 in single threaded, over 6,100 in multi-threaded, and it's a 15W chip.

    Not impressed with Tiger Lake.
    Reply
  • Makaveli
    pacdrum_88 said:
    This article is poorly researched. The numbers used for the Ryzen 4600H Geekbench score is disingenuous at best. A quick search reveals the processor scores far higher when paired with the proper memory. With a computer configured properly, the 4600H scores over 1,100 in single threaded and between 5,500 and 6,000 in multi-threaded. Besides that, if you're going to compare processors, the Ryzen 7 4800H, which is still cheaper than an i7, would be a better comparison. When configured properly, it scores over 1,200 in single threaded and over 8,000 in multi-threaded.

    Intel currently wins in single threaded, until Zen 3 launches. However, Intel is getting crushed in multi-threaded and will continue to for the foreseeable future.

    Just for kicks, I ran Geekbench 5 on my Dell Inspiron 5505 with a Rzyen 7 4700U. Far cheaper than any computer running an Intel Core i7, and even cheaper than most computers running an i5. Over 1,150 in single threaded, over 6,100 in multi-threaded, and it's a 15W chip.

    Not impressed with Tiger Lake.

    Not only that nobody cares about Geekbench scores, just like know no one cares about UserBenchmark.
    Reply
  • mikeinjbay
    pacdrum_88 said:
    This article is poorly researched. The numbers used for the Ryzen 4600H Geekbench score is disingenuous at best. A quick search reveals the processor scores far higher when paired with the proper memory. With a computer configured properly, the 4600H scores over 1,100 in single threaded and between 5,500 and 6,000 in multi-threaded. Besides that, if you're going to compare processors, the Ryzen 7 4800H, which is still cheaper than an i7, would be a better comparison. When configured properly, it scores over 1,200 in single threaded and over 8,000 in multi-threaded.

    Intel currently wins in single threaded, until Zen 3 launches. However, Intel is getting crushed in multi-threaded and will continue to for the foreseeable future.

    Just for kicks, I ran Geekbench 5 on my Dell Inspiron 5505 with a Rzyen 7 4700U. Far cheaper than any computer running an Intel Core i7, and even cheaper than most computers running an i5. Over 1,150 in single threaded, over 6,100 in multi-threaded, and it's a 15W chip.

    Not impressed with Tiger Lake.
    I'm not impressed either. I've an old i78750H and despite not exceeding 3.9ghz on boost (due for another clean), is giving 1076 in single core and 5738 multi core. IPC of Tiger Lake only slightly more than my generations old cpu.
    Reply
  • PCMan75
    i7 8750H is 6-core chip vs the Tiger Lake H chip (described in the article) which only has 4 cores.
    Incidentally, I've ~1.5 year old Thinkpad with i7-8650U (it has 4 cores) and 16GB ram - it produced these results with GB 5.3:

    774
    Single-Core Score

    2323
    Multi-Core Score

    The Tiger Lake chip is about twice as fast as my chip test results in single core scores and more than twice in multi core scores.
    Reply
  • spongiemaster
    pacdrum_88 said:
    Just for kicks, I ran Geekbench 5 on my Dell Inspiron 5505 with a Rzyen 7 4700U. Far cheaper than any computer running an Intel Core i7, and even cheaper than most computers running an i5. Over 1,150 in single threaded, over 6,100 in multi-threaded, and it's a 15W chip.

    Not impressed with Tiger Lake.
    If your research was any better than this article's, you would have looked at the Intel side as well and seen the Tiger Lake results in this article aren't likely to be accurate either.

    15W Tiger Lake scores about 1600 in single core, which crushes your 4700U by almost 40%. Quad-core 28W TL scores pretty much the same as your 15W 8 core 4700U in multithreaded. Congrats. It's unlikely the H version of TL is going to score worse than the U version benched below.


    Reply
  • JayNor
    The TGL-H is also increasing PCIE4 lanes to 24 from 4 on the TGL-U, according to some leaks.

    There are some leaks saying TGL-H will be paired with Intel's coming Xe-HPG graphics card, so perhaps the PCIE4 lanes provide some noticeable performance boost with that combo.

    There is an interview with Intel VP Phelps on crn, titled "
    How Intel’s Tiger Lake CPUs Are Designed For A ‘Spectrum Of Needs’", where he is quoted saying TGL will go to much higher speeds than 4.8GHz. I presume that requires the higher TGL-H TDP.

    1H2021 should be interesting.
    Reply