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Nvidia Ends Support For Kepler GPUs, Windows 7, Windows 8/8.1 On August 31

GeForce GTX Titan Z
GeForce GTX Titan Z (Image credit: Nvidia)

The time has finally come. Nvidia announced earlier today that it would stop supporting its Kepler-based graphics cards on older Windows operating systems with its next GeForce R470 driver. You won't find Kepler on the list of best graphics cards, but plenty of gamers still own one. As a result of the change, they'll no longer have access to new day-zero drivers.

The GeForce R470 driver, scheduled for August 31, is the last driver to support Kepler graphics cards that debuted back in 2012. Owners of Kepler graphics cards will continue to receive critical security updates until September 2024. However, they will lose out on Game Ready driver upgrades, including performance uplifts, new features and/or bug fixes.

Additionally, the GeForce R470 driver also marks the end of support for Microsoft's Windows 7, Windows 8, and Windows 8.1 operating systems. The same conditions apply to users of the aforementioned operating systems. They are eligible to receive critical security updates through September 2024 but do not qualify for Game Ready driver updates.

Therefore, the future GeForce R495 driver, which goes public on October 4, will be the first GeForce driver to arrive without support for Kepler-powered products and pre-Windows 10 operating systems.

We've attached a list of Kepler GeForce gaming graphics cards that are affected by Nvidia's latest move.

  • Nvidia GeForce GTX Titan Z 
  • Nvidia GeForce GTX Titan Black 
  • Nvidia GeForce GTX Titan 
  • Nvidia GeForce GTX 780 Ti 
  • Nvidia GeForce GTX 780 
  • Nvidia GeForce GTX 770 
  • Nvidia GeForce GTX 760 Ti 
  • Nvidia GeForce GTX 760
  • Nvidia GeForce GTX 760 (192-bit)
  • Nvidia GeForce GTX 760 Ti OEM 
  • Nvidia GeForce GT 740 
  • Nvidia GeForce GT 730 
  • Nvidia GeForce GT 720 
  • Nvidia GeForce GT 710
  • Nvidia GeForce GTX 690
  • Nvidia GeForce GTX 680
  • Nvidia GeForce GTX 670
  • Nvidia GeForce GTX 660 Ti
  • Nvidia GeForce GTX 660
  • Nvidia GeForce GTX 650 Ti Boost
  • Nvidia GeForce GTX 650 Ti
  • Nvidia GeForce GTX 650
  • Nvidia GeForce GTX 645
  • Nvidia GeForce GTX 640
  • Nvidia GeForce GTX 635
  • Nvidia GeForce GTX 630
  • Joseph_138
    This news couldn't have come at a worse time, with the cost of upgrading to a newer generation being as high as it is. It's only going to add to the demand for whatever cards are currently available and drive prices even higher. Also bad is that Maxwell is now on the bubble, so it makes no sense to upgrade from a Kepler to a Maxwell, if it is going to be next to be dropped from support, and who knows how many more driver releases it is going to have. It could have 2 or 3 more years of driver updates, or 2 or 3 more months. It would suck to spend big money for a 980Ti now, only to lose driver support a few months later.
    Reply
  • littlechipsbigchips
    Joseph_138 said:
    This news couldn't have come at a worse time, with the cost of upgrading to a newer generation being as high as it is. It's only going to add to the demand for whatever cards are currently available and drive prices even higher. Also bad is that Maxwell is now on the bubble, so it makes no sense to upgrade from a Kepler to a Maxwell, if it is going to be next to be dropped from support, and who knows how many more driver releases it is going to have. It could have 2 or 3 more years of driver updates, or 2 or 3 more months. It would suck to spend big money for a 980Ti now, only to lose driver support a few months later.

    There is no point in buying such old cards ... IMO if you want to use such cards get a PS5 or XBOX and game on them until the GPU cards prices come down.
    Reply
  • USAFRet
    littlechipsbigchips said:
    There is no point in buying such old cards ... IMO if you want to use such cards get a PS5 or XBOX and game on them until the GPU cards prices come down.
    People do things other than "game" with a PC.
    Reply
  • spongiemaster
    Joseph_138 said:
    This news couldn't have come at a worse time, with the cost of upgrading to a newer generation being as high as it is. It's only going to add to the demand for whatever cards are currently available and drive prices even higher. Also bad is that Maxwell is now on the bubble, so it makes no sense to upgrade from a Kepler to a Maxwell, if it is going to be next to be dropped from support, and who knows how many more driver releases it is going to have. It could have 2 or 3 more years of driver updates, or 2 or 3 more months. It would suck to spend big money for a 980Ti now, only to lose driver support a few months later.
    The Kepler architecture is 9 years old. That's an eternity in this industry. At some point, it is time to move on, and Kepler is past that point. Due to RAM limitations alone, the only card still potentially usable for current generation AAA games at only 1080p is the original Titan. Maxwell is on the clock now, and even though it is 3 years newer, that still makes it 6 years old. If you're paying a "fortune" to buy a Maxwell card today, that's on you., and just a bad use of money.
    Reply
  • spongiemaster
    USAFRet said:
    People do things other than "game" with a PC.
    Sure, but that's the only reason someone would care about this announcement. What company is using Kepler gaming cards on a Windows 8 box for production purposes?
    Reply
  • USAFRet
    spongiemaster said:
    Sure, but that's the only reason someone would care about this announcement. What company is using Kepler gaming cards on a Windows 8 box for production purposes?
    Doesn't have to be at the corporate level.

    Plenty of people do photo/video/CAD, on a personal level. Which can benefit from a GPU.
    Reply
  • spongiemaster
    USAFRet said:
    Doesn't have to be at the corporate level.

    Plenty of people do photo/video/CAD, on a personal level. Which can benefit from a GPU.
    When was the last time you think a driver update had any meaningful impact on Kepler's photo editing performance/stability? This announcement is meaningless.
    Reply
  • USAFRet
    spongiemaster said:
    When was the last time you think a driver update had any meaningful impact on Kepler's photo editing performance/stability? This announcement is meaningless.
    Oh, I agree.
    My initial response here was just to refute the "xbox/playstation" thing.
    Reply
  • Joseph_138
    littlechipsbigchips said:
    There is no point in buying such old cards ... IMO if you want to use such cards get a PS5 or XBOX and game on them until the GPU cards prices come down.

    There is if you're using something even older. Check out the hardware forums. There are still a lot of people using cards from this generation, and some older than that. Someone using a GeForce 400 or 500 card would consider a 600 or 700 card an upgrade. Not everyone can afford the newest hardware as soon as it comes out.
    Reply
  • foxrox
    The only response to this news that I can provide at this time:

    Bastards.
    Reply