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New Windows 10 Features Announced, Build 10162 Makes It To Slow Ring

Before the Fourth of July weekend, Microsoft released yet another Fast Ring build of Windows 10. The goal was to get a few days of testing in on the new OS before letting the Slow Ring of Windows Insiders have it. Well, it seems that the users in the Fast Ring didn't have many problems, because that is exactly what is happening, and build 10162 has come to the Slow Ring.

In addition, Microsoft also announced several new features coming to the finished version of Windows 10.

For the Windows Insiders who have been stuck on Build 10130 for what feels like an eternity, this is reason to celebrate. Although it's of course not a finished version of Windows 10, build 10162 has hundreds of improvements over build 10130.

Build 10159 alone featured over 300 fixes, an updated log-in screen, and a new default Windows background. This was a substantial improvement, but there have also been three other complete Fast Ring builds between Build 10130 and Build 10162, so the Windows Insiders in the Slow Ring have missed a lot.

In addition to the Slow Ring build release, Microsoft announced several new features coming to Windows 10. The first of these new features was the Minecraft: Windows 10 Edition beta released over the weekend.

The Xbox Music and Xbox Video applications used in current builds of Windows 10 are to be replaced in the final version with new apps titled "Groove" for music and "Movies & TV" for video.

The Groove application keeps your music synced up with your OneDrive, including music you have purchased from iTunes, and as a result it makes accessing your music on your PC and Xbox easier.

Users can also purchase a Groove Music Pass subscription that allows for ad-free listening to any music in the Windows Store. Microsoft plans to charge $9.99 a month, or $99 a year for users to be able to stream and download any of the 40 million tracks in the catalog.

Although at first blush this sounds great for users, it's reasonable to question if it's a practical move for Microsoft, as many users could download most if not all of their favorite music within a month.

The Movies & TV app sees less change, but it added support for .MKV files and enjoyed general feature enhancements. The application will be directly connected to the Windows Store and will allow users to rent or buy movies and TV shows.

Finally, Microsoft is enabling a new application known as the "Feedback Engine," which does exactly what you would expect. There's nothing too fancy here, but it is good to see Microsoft trying to take in feedback and being open to improving its products over time.

Windows Insiders will get to experience these new updated applications in a build expected to arrive this week. Then, after the release of Windows 10 on desktops, the Xbox One game console will also receive the update.

Although there are still 23 days to go until the release of Windows 10, everyone looking forward to using the latest Windows operating system can look at this as a sign that things are improving, and that a finished feature-rich Windows 10 experience will be here soon.

Follow Michael Justin Allen Sexton @LordLao74. Follow us @tomshardware, on Facebook and on Google+.

  • Blinken
    get in a "groove" that you can't remove (from your OS), only $9.99!
    Reply
  • AggressorPrime
    Michael, I think your assumptions are wrong when you write:
    "Although at first blush this sounds great for users, it's reasonable to question if it's a practical move for Microsoft, as many users could download most if not all of their favorite music within a month."

    Don't expect Microsoft to let consumers download content in a normal .mp3 file format. According to their ToS found here (http://www.xbox.com/en-US/Legal/Usage-Rules):
    *Failure to sign into Services at least once every 30 days might allow digital licenses to expire and therefore deprive you of access to previously downloaded content
    **For music downloaded onto external devices, you may need to connect these devices to a computer and log into the Services to maintain access to content

    As such, you won't be able to keep access to all the music you download without a subscription. Most likely, Microsoft will use its own music app with its own file format that requires a license check every 30 days or becomes unplayable.
    Reply
  • SteelCity1981
    why must this stuff have to be installed on an os. why can't microsoft give people options to download this stuff separately is that too much to ask?
    Reply
  • Puiucs
    why must this stuff have to be installed on an os. why can't microsoft give people options to download this stuff separately is that too much to ask?
    when MS is trying to convince developers that apps on win 10 will be successful you are asking MS to remove proof of concept, first party apps apps from the final build? that seems like a stupid business decision if you ask me.
    Reply
  • jonathan1683
    why must this stuff have to be installed on an os. why can't microsoft give people options to download this stuff separately is that too much to ask?


    because the people that are willing to use it are too stupid to download it.
    Reply
  • TechyInAZ
    10130 build was a disaster for me, windows update would freeze every time I would try getting to 10159. So 10162 is a very reliable upgrade.
    Reply
  • jimmysmitty
    16196899 said:
    why must this stuff have to be installed on an os. why can't microsoft give people options to download this stuff separately is that too much to ask?

    Because Microsoft just can't win. If they include features, people (like yourself) complain. If they remove features, people complain (look at the backlash of no DVD codec).

    Why does it even matter if it is there or not? It is an app that will be disabled unless you use it and it probably doesn't take up much space. It looks like 10 will need 22GB at launch and 22GB these days is a drop in the bucket, even on a SSD with 256GB being easily affordable.
    Reply
  • alextheblue
    It looks like 10 will need 22GB at launch and 22GB these days is a drop in the bucket, even on a SSD with 256GB being easily affordable.

    Some configurations will actually use a lot less space than that. That's a full-blown desktop install. Look at how small they managed to get some 8.1 installs for tablets later into its lifecycle.
    Reply
  • MasterMace
    Microsoft needs to stop making crappy OSes, and stop releasing them every other year. People went from XP in 2000 (SP2 in 2004 made it good) to Windows 7 in 2009. Nobody wanted Windows 8 or 8.1. Microsoft needs to get rid of their crappy box fetish that they brought back from the 90s.
    Reply
  • Darkbreeze
    I hope they're working a lot of overtime. I'm still seeing a LOT of driver and other issues with peripheral hardware.
    Reply