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Corsair RM750x PSU Review

Corsair released its RMx PSU line, which the company claims will offer good performance along with silent operation. Unlike the RMi models, the RMx units lack a digital interface, a fan test button, and uses a Rifle bearing fan instead of an FDB version.

Packaging, Contents, Exterior And Cabling

Packaging

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On the front of the package is a quarter-shot of the PSU, with the modular panel exposed. Near the bottom-right side is the model description, and right above it, two badges depict the 80 PLUS Gold efficiency and the product's seven-year warranty. On the front, bottom side, a brief, multilingual list shows the most interesting features of the PSU. In addition to the Gold efficiency certification, this includes the platform's semipassive operation, exclusive use of Japanese capacitors and good performance levels.

On the top of the box, Corsair provides information about the available connectors and the cable length, something that we found very useful. However, in the end, we always measure cable length on our own to confirm the data that the manufacturer provides. Finally, on the rear side, two graphs depict the fan and efficiency curves, and a table shows the power specifications. You will also find the unit's dimensions on this side.

Contents

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As usual for a Corsair high-end product, adequate protection is provided inside the package by a couple of thick foam spacers. In addition, the PSU is stored in a nice cloth bag.

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The bundle includes a nylon pouch, which will come handy for storing the unused modular cables. The other accessories include several zip ties, a set of fixing bolts, an AC power cord and a case badge. Finally, you will also get a user's manual and a warranty leaflet.

Exterior

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A sticker on the front of the PSU informs future owners that at light and mid loads, the fan won't spin. Corsair apparently didn't want some users, who aren't familiar with PSUs featuring a semipassive mode, to believe that their shiny, new PSUs were defective once they noticed the fan didn't spin.

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On the front, the classic, honeycomb fan grille is used, and the small on/off switch is located next to the AC receptacle. This is installed vertically instead of the typical horizontal mount. On the sides, two large decals show the model number, while the power specifications label can be found on the bottom.

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The modular panel doesn't include many sockets, since this PSU features only four PCIe connectors and a single EPS. The characteristic design of the fan grille, with the parallel lines, is used on all Corsair high-end models, and it makes them stand out from the crowd. This fan grille design looks nice, but the remaining exterior section of this unit is rather boring. Finally, the dimensions of the RM750x are quite large for a PSU of this capacity, and we believe that in the future Corsair should offer a more compact version.

Cabling

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The cables are stealth, meaning that they consist of darkened gauges. The ATX, PCIe and EPS cables feature solid capacitors, which help in ripple suppression. The remaining SATA and peripheral cables are flat, in order to block less airflow inside the chassis.

Aris Mpitziopoulos
Aris Mpitziopoulos is a Contributing Editor at Tom's Hardware US, covering PSUs.