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Intel Targeting 22nm Chips by 2011

By - Source: Tom's Hardware US | B 41 comments

Big things are getting smaller.

Just after Intel was proud to show off its 32nm wafer for its Westmere processor, the world's largest chipmaker today brought out the first working chips built on the 22nm process.

Intel President and CEO Paul Otellini took to the stage with 22nm test circuits that include both SRAM memory as well as logic circuits to be used in future Intel microprocessors.

"At Intel, Moore's Law is alive and thriving," said Otellini. "We've begun production of the world's first 32nm microprocessor, which is also the first high-performance processor to integrate graphics with the CPU. At the same time, we're already moving ahead with development of our 22nm manufacturing technology and have built working chips that will pave the way for production of still more powerful and more capable processors."

Each individual die from the 22nm wafer contained 364 million bits of SRAM memory and has more than 2.9 billion transistors packed into an area the size of a fingernail.

Intel said that production chips using the 22nm process should be ready for the second half of 2011.

Update: Video of the announcement now embedded below:

IDF 2009: Otellini 22 mit Nanometer Waver

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  • 1 Hide
    ubernoobie , September 22, 2009 10:28 PM
    Damn, and 32nm isn't even on the mainstream market for cpus
  • 8 Hide
    doomtomb , September 22, 2009 10:39 PM
    Intel is on a roll.
  • -1 Hide
    DoofusOfDeath , September 22, 2009 10:50 PM
    Anyone know when we'll start seeing laptops based on the Intel processors that are being announced tomorrow? (Specifically, Core i7-820QM or Core i7-720QM)
  • -1 Hide
    Shadow703793 , September 22, 2009 10:58 PM
    doofusofdeathAnyone know when we'll start seeing laptops based on the Intel processors that are being announced tomorrow? (Specifically, Core i7-820QM or Core i7-720QM)

    ^I'd say around Christmas or earlier.
  • 8 Hide
    Anonymous , September 22, 2009 11:00 PM
    By 2011? The article says 2nd half 2011, so that would be by 2012, but we all know how that usually works out, so let's say "around 2012".
  • -1 Hide
    DoofusOfDeath , September 22, 2009 11:01 PM
    @shadow703793: Thanks. Just occurred to me that I should post this on the homepage's questions section, not in this thread.
  • 2 Hide
    zerapio , September 22, 2009 11:14 PM
    2012_or_gtfoBy 2011? The article says 2nd half 2011, so that would be by 2012, but we all know how that usually works out, so let's say "around 2012".

    Eh? It says 2011 because it IS 2011. All of Intel's die shrinks on its new tick-tock model have been introduced in fall of an odd year. Penryn (2007), Westmere (2009) and Ivy Bridge (2011).
  • 0 Hide
    presidenteody , September 22, 2009 11:18 PM
    I WANT ONE!!!
  • 0 Hide
    Anonymous , September 22, 2009 11:23 PM
    zerapio: Read the headline, "by 2011" means sometime late 2010, when the article states the 2nd half of 2011. "By" indicates it will happen "before".
  • 1 Hide
    zerapio , September 22, 2009 11:35 PM
    english_grammar_wizardryzerapio: Read the headline, "by 2011" means sometime late 2010, when the article states the 2nd half of 2011. "By" indicates it will happen "before".

    Wow, you're serious. Here, read something: http://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/by
    In this article the word 'by' is used as meaning "no later than" or no later than 2011. The year 2011 is not an instant so therefore the second half of 2011 is still considered as 2011.
  • -4 Hide
    Anonymous , September 23, 2009 12:01 AM
    zerapio: Way to twist things around to support your thesis. "By the end of 2011" or "Sometime in 2011" would support your argument, but he said "By 2011", so that means January 1, 2011 the **instant** that 2011 happens.

    Compare, why would the wording:

    "By the end of"

    exist if

    "By..."

    Meant the same thing? "By the end of the day" or "By today". "By the end of the week", or "By this week". Since the date/time/year here are arbitrary and don't contribute a context, please explain to me that this is how you speak in normal life.
  • 1 Hide
    tempelife , September 23, 2009 12:08 AM
    Isn't Moore's law going to hit a massive hurdle at 16-18nm in roughly 2013, which would be the logical step after 22nm? I hear the die is too small for electricity to not to create damage. Any experts want to weigh in on this. I just have a vague recollection from a nanotechnology show I watched I the science channel about 9 months ago.
  • -3 Hide
    zerapio , September 23, 2009 12:20 AM
    zerapiownagezerapio: Way to twist things around to support your thesis.

    You: by 2011 = before 2011
    Dictionary: by 2011 = no later than 2011

    I can see how by your definition you think Marcus is wrong but the dictionary agrees with him. End of conversation.
  • 1 Hide
    Dekasav , September 23, 2009 12:32 AM
    "If you're early, you're on-time
    If you're on-time, you're late
    If you're late, don't show up."
  • -5 Hide
    Anonymous , September 23, 2009 1:00 AM
    zerapio: No, you're injecting into the definition that 2011 is not an "instant" or an "event", but it is, you sound like Christian-folk referencing the Bible, then interpreting it to mean whatever you want(and then trying to declare the conversation over).
  • -1 Hide
    matt87_50 , September 23, 2009 1:08 AM
    so, does that mean 45MB of cache! :D 

    i7 9xx has 700m transistors, 8meg of cache.
    so in two years will have 4 times the transistors and 5 times the cache?

    guess i'll upgrade then (if gpgpu hasn't completely destroyed any reason to have a powerful cpu, on the other hand these chips would be mighty awesome in larrabee too.)

    tempelifeIsn't Moore's law going to hit a massive hurdle at 16-18nm in roughly 2013, which would be the logical step after 22nm? I hear the die is too small for electricity to not to create damage. Any experts want to weigh in on this. I just have a vague recollection from a nanotechnology show I watched I the science channel about 9 months ago.


    Apparently there is an issue with quantum tunneling. I herd a year or so ago that someone had figured out away to reliably predict how small you can make it before you get quantum tunneling, so if they don't find away around that they may indeed hit a brick wall.

  • 1 Hide
    belardo , September 23, 2009 1:13 AM
    Geez..

    Whatever. The 45nm are still new and no rush to put 22nm out too fast. They are making memory chips, as usual. We won't be seeing any complex CPUs using 22nm for 2 years... which is about right.
  • 1 Hide
    socrates047 , September 23, 2009 1:33 AM
    "Big things are getting smaller." lol
  • 2 Hide
    Anonymous , September 23, 2009 2:32 AM
    This sounds just like HDDs. I remember a few years ago they saying that HDD manufacturers will hit a wall in the amount of data that could be crammed onto a platter, but yet they managed to find a way around it and 2TB drives are becoming affordable. The top R&D guys knew this was coming ages ago and I bet they are already working out ways around it.
  • -9 Hide
    sonofliberty08 , September 23, 2009 3:43 AM
    but can it run crysis ???
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