Sign in with
Sign up | Sign in

Intel's 32nm Core i7 Coming this Year

By - Source: Tom's Hardware US | B 33 comments

On a telephone briefing today, Intel announced that its 32 nm processors will begin production later this year, specifically in the 4th quarter of 2009.

Intel is in the process of bringing Core i7 down to a 32 nm fabrication process and will begin production and shipping of the processor in the second half of 2009. The new 32 nm platform is codenamed Westmere and is comprised of two 32 nm Core i7 processors and a new chipset family called the Intel 5-series (P55 and P57). With the move to 32 nm, Intel will free up room on the package to integrate graphics. With Westmere-based Core i7 processors, the first series of products will come with a 45nm integrated graphics core and memory controller, on a separate die, on the same processor.

According to Intel, the following processors will be on their way later this year:

Desktop Performance / Mainstream:
Clarkdale: 2 cores / 4 threads, with integrated graphics/memory controller

Mobile Extreme / Mainstream:
Arrandale: 2 cores /4 threads, with integrated graphics/memory controller

Intel will be utilizing existing graphics technologies, manufacture the integrated graphics die at 45nm and not be using any new graphics technologies--specifically Larrabee.

Prior to the two 32 nm Core i7 products above, Intel will release Lynnfield and Clarksfield for the desktop and mobile markets, respectively. Both of which will be 45 nm Core i7 processors offering four cores/eight threads with the same on-die memory controller as existing i7 CPUs. All four processors will be running on the Intel 5-series chipset family as well. While Intel did say that 32 nm processors will begin production later in the year, Intel hesitated to indicate when products from OEMs will begin to be available on the market.

Once Intel's Westmere platform is on the market, Intel will begin its next transition into a future platform called Sandy Bridge, which will succeed the Nehalem microarchitecture.

Discuss
Ask a Category Expert

Create a new thread in the News comments forum about this subject

Example: Notebook, Android, SSD hard drive

This thread is closed for comments
  • 1 Hide
    68vistacruiser , February 10, 2009 5:11 PM
    Well, there's another motherboard upgrade, I bet. I figured my X58 would only be good for the 45nm cpu's, and I'm sure that will end up being true.
  • 7 Hide
    hop , February 10, 2009 5:12 PM
    Can't keep up anymore, as soon as you buy a system, it goes out of style in six months. :-)
  • 4 Hide
    Anonymous , February 10, 2009 5:25 PM
    way to go intel.. produce the bast cpu's and then cripple it with suck ass graphics controllers..
  • Display all 33 comments.
  • -3 Hide
    Tindytim , February 10, 2009 5:27 PM
    Only 2 cores?

    They aren't offering Enthusiast models with the 32nm?
  • 2 Hide
    etrnl_frost , February 10, 2009 5:40 PM
    Pretty much, Hop. I'm stopping with my Q9650 and settling down until this all stops. Which... might be never, but I'll be that much more rich.
  • 3 Hide
    Tindytim , February 10, 2009 5:43 PM
    HopCan't keep up anymore, as soon as you buy a system, it goes out of style in six months. :-)

    I don't think these models are attempts to beat out the Current Core i7s. They're just here to start filling in the i7 line with more mainstream products.
  • 3 Hide
    rocketw31 , February 10, 2009 5:51 PM
    If you are on X58 you are going backwards by going to 32nm at this time. It seems that some people don't understand that not every new product that comes out is better than the one they have now, and that Intel markets parts to many different segments of the market. Did people not even read the part of the article that talked about these chips using integrated graphics and having 2 cores? Do people read ANYTHING anymore??????????????????????????????????????
  • -1 Hide
    alvine , February 10, 2009 5:53 PM
    I was hoping for 4+ core 32nm cpu :< Kinda cool that they integrate gpu on it so MAYBE you can power off the big graphic cards and use the integrated while you surf the internet....
  • 0 Hide
    descendency , February 10, 2009 6:09 PM
    Why is the on die memory controller 2 channel if Westmere is a 3 channel cpu? Is Westmere not like the current Nehalem processors?

    This would be saddening...
  • -1 Hide
    etrnl_frost , February 10, 2009 6:32 PM
    rocketw31If you are on X58 you are going backwards by going to 32nm at this time. It seems that some people don't understand that not every new product that comes out is better than the one they have now, and that Intel markets parts to many different segments of the market. Did people not even read the part of the article that talked about these chips using integrated graphics and having 2 cores? Do people read ANYTHING anymore??????????????????????????????????????


    Hey, I read it. And I also note that it's not necessarily raw power that keeps people upgrading. Efficiency is another thing that is looked at. The move to a smaller process will probably lead to cooler processors - and in this case something interesting in die size, where they can add particular integrated chipsets. This is a boon to the HTPC market. However, just buying the die shrunk 45nm Core 2 Duo last year for an HTPC... it makes one wonder how much money idle costs are causing them to throw out the window.
  • 1 Hide
    Mathos , February 10, 2009 6:33 PM
    descendencyWhy is the on die memory controller 2 channel if Westmere is a 3 channel cpu? Is Westmere not like the current Nehalem processors? This would be saddening...


    The dual cores, and the socket 1066 processors are not suppose to have an on die IMC. If they do it that way they can still produce I5's and what not that use DDR2 memory. Or as it appears put a modified Penryn core on the same package as a memory controller and gpu.
  • -5 Hide
    gnesterenko , February 10, 2009 6:35 PM
    Actually I'm pretty sure I read just yesterday that there was supposed to be a dual core 45nm Nahlem that was scrapped due to huge C2D inventories. Instead, the article said, Intel will release a westemere dual core - which will be THE GAMING ENTHUSIAST CPU! People don't seem to understand that these new 4x and future octa-core CPUs have zero application outside of digital content creation and server environments. For every "average" user out there, a dual core is enough. For any GAMER who is seeking max frame rates, quad core is absolutely useless. Take a dual core, and you can overclock it further (only 2 cores instead of 4 = less heat), get yourself more GHz and hence more frame rates. Considering Intel just recently put up the C2D E8700 at 3.5GHz, I'm hoping to build a Westmere system with a CPU that will clock close to 4GHz at stock, which will hopefully allow me to push it into the 5.5GHz+ territory.

    Now, the two chips mentioned in the article aren't it. THey have intergrated graphics so for a gamer, quickly forgettable. Scrap the graphics controller. Push the clock far. Stick in 1-2MBs of L2 Cache per core (but don't forget the L3 please). Unlock the multipler. If I could get me a CPU like that, I'd be set until the end of the world (2013 in case you were wandering).

    "The views expressed here are mine and do not reflect the official opinion of my employer or the organization through which the Internet was accessed."
  • 5 Hide
    Anonymous , February 10, 2009 8:08 PM
    Lots of misinformation - this is the mainstream/value chip, so for those enthusiasts who are whining about buying an x58 chip and thinking it will not be compatible with the 32nm gen, you need to turn in your enthusiast card. There will be a 32nm version of the Core i7 as well (a quad core) and that will replace the current 45nm quads and use the same socket (and I have to think will be compatible with the x58)

    For those who have a quad core i7 -why would you want to replace a quad core chip like that with a dual core and integrated graphics? Just doesn't make sense... Think... think again... then type your comment. (not the other way around)
  • 1 Hide
    pug_s , February 10, 2009 8:51 PM
    I will probably wait 18 months until I upgrade my rig. I figure by then ddr3 memory will be cheap, windows 7 will come out, and an i7 entry level processor motherboard/cpu will cost less than $200.
  • -2 Hide
    Greatwalrus , February 10, 2009 10:03 PM
    Dang it. I just can never figure out when to buy a new computer now. Every time, there's another, better system around the corner. I guess I will have to wait after 32nm and before 22nm, because 22nm is supposed to take a little bit longer I believe.
  • 4 Hide
    Tindytim , February 10, 2009 10:43 PM
    GreatWalrusDang it. I just can never figure out when to buy a new computer now. Every time, there's another, better system around the corner. I guess I will have to wait after 32nm and before 22nm, because 22nm is supposed to take a little bit longer I believe.


    These aren't going to be better than the current processors, they'll be the mainstream processors for everyday people.
  • 2 Hide
    rocketw31 , February 10, 2009 11:19 PM
    The fact that a common user may be ripping and encoding dvd's completely puts to bed the idea that a common user doesn't have a need for 4 or more cores. Do you realize that a blu ray rip takes hours even on a high end 4 core machine. To rip and encode my blu ray discs for my portable media player takes ages. I need more and faster cores and so do alot of other people.

    The idea that people aren't using their 4 core machines is a load of hogwash.
  • 0 Hide
    Greatwalrus , February 10, 2009 11:27 PM
    TindytimThese aren't going to be better than the current processors, they'll be the mainstream processors for everyday people.


    But with a smaller manufacturing method, don't these processors run with less energy, faster speeds, and on smaller chips?

    Wouldn't a Core i7 920 perform better as a 32nm chip rather than a 45nm chip?

    I'm totally open to whatever you have to say, I'm just beginning to learn more about processors and manufacturing technology.
  • 2 Hide
    Tindytim , February 10, 2009 11:36 PM
    GreatWalrusBut with a smaller manufacturing method, don't these processors run with less energy, faster speeds, and on smaller chips?Wouldn't a Core i7 920 perform better as a 32nm chip rather than a 45nm chip? I'm totally open to whatever you have to say, I'm just beginning to learn more about processors and manufacturing technology.


    It does, and you're right.

    But, these initial 32nm processors are going to be made for the mainstream and for laptops. So far, Intel only has Enthusiast i7 processors, meant for high performance. But it needs to populate the Core i7 line with mainstream processors.

    At some point Intel will release Enthusiast processors at 32nm, meant for high performance, but these are going to be low power, cheap, and efficient.
  • -2 Hide
    Anonymous , February 10, 2009 11:43 PM
    LOL

    Integrating crappy Intel integrated graphics into the CPU instead of the Northbridge. Yeah, let's move the GPU to the CPU, that way we can waste some of the heatsink's thermal dissipation. Of course, this offers no value vs. leaving it in the northbridge, but hey, they might just beat AMD to market with an integrated CPU/GPU, even if it is teh suck.
Display more comments