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Intel to Use eMLC in Next-Gen Enterprise SSDs

By - Source: Tom's Hardware US | B 17 comments

The next-gen of Intel SSDs using 25nm flash are coming later this year.

Intel recently announced that its 25nm NAND flash chips are now shipping in volume to customers. This also means that we can soon expect a refresh of the Intel SSD's that are currently based off of 34nm Postville parts later this year.

Intel's next generation 25nm SSD parts for enterprises will use a new type of enterprise multi-level cell (eMLC) flash memory, which are expected to be even more resilient than other existing technologies, according to a roadmap seen by X-bit Labs.

Those looking to beef up their home gaming rigs will probably be more interested in the SSDs targeted towards enthusiasts. The next round of Intel X25-M will come in 600GB, 300GB, 160GB and 80GB capacities. This will mean roomier drives for those with the resources to purchase one, while the 80GB and 160GB models hopefully will be more affordable to those looking for a speedy OS drive.

For reference, the 34nm-based 80GB and 160GB models can be had for around $200 and $400, respectively.

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  • 9 Hide
    Anonymous , June 24, 2010 1:12 PM
    Will it use the SATA 6 Gbit/s or SATA 3 Gbit/s?
  • 5 Hide
    gekko668 , June 24, 2010 1:18 PM
    That's nice but I still can't afford it.
  • 0 Hide
    balister , June 24, 2010 1:29 PM
    Billy BobWill it use the SATA 6 Gbit/s or SATA 3 Gbit/s?


    If it's enterprise class, more likely SAS.
  • 3 Hide
    apache_lives , June 24, 2010 1:29 PM
    gekko668That's nice but I still can't afford it.


    thats what normal hdd's are for
  • 1 Hide
    ares1214 , June 24, 2010 2:16 PM
    if it is for enterprise, and all of it is changing, will it be as fast as ssd right now?
  • 1 Hide
    TidalWaveOne , June 24, 2010 2:29 PM
    The expression "off of" is never correct.
  • 0 Hide
    zaznet , June 24, 2010 2:37 PM
    ares1214if it is for enterprise, and all of it is changing, will it be as fast as ssd right now?


    In the Enterprise they certainly worry about speed but sometimes more important is redundancy or data protection and availability of that data. It's difficult to say from this article if the extra layers are for speed, capacity or data protection.

    No matter what the focus the end result will be cheaper home user SSD drives as chip production ramps up and chips are improved.
  • -1 Hide
    kalogagatya , June 24, 2010 3:12 PM
    i don't understand SSD manufacturers: they design a standard SSD, which is much better that a great HDD, but it is too expensive, and no one buys it.
    Then they design a better SSD, better than the standard SSD, also more expensive and duh, still people don't buy it.
    And THEN they launch EVEN BETTER SSDs which cost EVEN MORE. do they even notice that people won't buy the standard because they still ARE TOO DAMN EXPENSIVE???

    solution: they design sub-standard SSDs, with prices that HANG on the balance between just and overpriced....

    10*500 is less than 1000*100, don't they know this?
  • 1 Hide
    ethanolson , June 24, 2010 3:17 PM
    I hope it'll be released in SAS DP 6G variants!
  • 1 Hide
    webbwbb , June 24, 2010 3:27 PM
    kalogagatyai don't understand SSD manufacturers: they design a standard SSD, which is much better that a great HDD, but it is too expensive, and no one buys it.Then they design a better SSD, better than the standard SSD, also more expensive and duh, still people don't buy it.And THEN they launch EVEN BETTER SSDs which cost EVEN MORE. do they even notice that people won't buy the standard because they still ARE TOO DAMN EXPENSIVE???solution: they design sub-standard SSDs, with prices that HANG on the balance between just and overpriced....10*500 is less than 1000*100, don't they know this?


    The problem with SSD prices is not that they are too expensive to manufacture; they are too difficult to keep in stock because they are bought up so quickly. Several months ago Newegg more than doubled the price of them because the demand far outstretched the supply. even with that dramatic price increase they are not always in stock. For the general user they are still too expensive but there are many uses where it is a very justifiable purchase.
  • 2 Hide
    gnesterenko , June 24, 2010 3:31 PM
    @kalogagatya
    A) They are definitely selling the new ones, albeit in small quantities - just like with every other new tech, there are few early adopters
    B) As they introduce new, expensive generations, old ones get cheaper and cheaper, eventually inventories clear out
    C) They aren't exactly getting more expensive either. The original G1 Intel MLC SSD, 80GB retailed for almost $600 MSRP - as opposed to 2G 80GB costing $200 now.
    D) 1000*10 + 900*20 + 800*30 ... so on >>> then selling all of them at the same time for cheap.

    "The views expressed here are mine and do not reflect the official opinion of my employer or the organization through which the Internet was accessed."
  • 0 Hide
    jacobdrj , June 24, 2010 3:51 PM
    The magic number is $1/GB for me... Come on Intel, MAKE IT HAPPEN!
  • 3 Hide
    jacobdrj , June 24, 2010 3:55 PM
    kalogagatyai don't understand SSD manufacturers: they design a standard SSD, which is much better that a great HDD, but it is too expensive, and no one buys it.Then they design a better SSD, better than the standard SSD, also more expensive and duh, still people don't buy it.And THEN they launch EVEN BETTER SSDs which cost EVEN MORE. do they even notice that people won't buy the standard because they still ARE TOO DAMN EXPENSIVE???solution: they design sub-standard SSDs, with prices that HANG on the balance between just and overpriced....10*500 is less than 1000*100, don't they know this?

    I got some bad news for your theory: People ARE buying this stuff. What is more, enterprise customers are demanding this stuff like crazy. Production is limited. They just haven't finished constructing new fabrication facilities (according to PC World). Demand is high. Profit margins are high. There is no other product on earth that can achieve these I/O numbers with such little investment/electrical power requirements.
    And enthusiasts WILL PAY for SSDs... Price will go down when the market is saturated. We are not there yet...
  • 0 Hide
    SuckRaven , June 24, 2010 5:44 PM
    I would love to see Tom's Hardware put one of these up against a similar Intel drive with SLC, such as the Intel X-25E.
  • 0 Hide
    descendency , June 24, 2010 9:38 PM
    It's funny that people complain about SSD prices not falling fast enough, yet for just about every year I've been watching SSD prices (since they hit like $10+ dollars per gigabyte) they've been dropping roughly 75% per year.I bought a vertex 120gb one when it first launched for around $450. That same drive is 300 now (at newegg, which over-prices SSDs anyways). No, that's not 75% anymore. But 67% over 2 years is still pretty fast price shrinkage and we haven't even hit the major price drop coming this year. I wouldn't be shocked to see that same drive for well under $2 dollars per gigabyte which would basically mean that it will have dropped over 75% over 2 years.

    That's still insanely fast price decreasing.

    And for the performance benefits you gain in certain kinds of computing (which is basically anything that requires lots of hard-drive access... like booting, photoshopping large files, application development, databasing, etc) you see a large boost in performance.
  • 0 Hide
    liquidsnake718 , June 25, 2010 5:04 AM
    80gb at $200 sounds a bit more reasonable today, I might consider this yet, I would love to wait for $150 but somehow I think this will take another year of waiting, therefore i might just end up buying the 60 or 80gb variant soon!
  • 0 Hide
    dEAne , June 25, 2010 10:05 AM
    enterprise troubles.