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Conclusion

AMD Radeon HD 6990 4 GB Review: Antilles Makes (Too Much) Noise
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I can only see two reasons that anyone would buy a Radeon HD 6990, given the other options currently available.

First, because this is a dual-slot card, you’re able to fit two of them in an ATX chassis and enjoy the potential of quad-CrossFire. The list of problems with this prospect is significant, though. You’re dumping half of the heat from each card back into your chassis. That’s unsustainable to the point where boutique system builders are simply failing the config, choosing not to offer it at all. Enthusiasts with a lot of money are sure to scratch their heads, wondering why such a setup isn't available. The short answer is that it doesn't result in a good experience. And if a single card is capable of making the GTX 480 sound like a kitty cat's purr, a pair would have to be unbearable times two. I’d quantify my guess for you, but AMD smartly only shipped us a single board. Instead, I have to rely on the expert testimony of builders who’ve already tried quad-CrossFire and are reporting noise levels about six decibels higher than with one card installed.

Second, you really want access to five display outputs. In that case, please don't let me dissuade you. The Radeon HD 6990 certainly has a rich I/O suite that Nvidia can't come anywhere close to matching today. And the single-GPU Radeon HD 6900-series cards "only" give you the option to connect four screens simultaneously, for now.

Chase Is A Race, Nvidia

AMD does get to claim the title of fastest graphics card in the world—an honor it already held with the Radeon HD 5970. But this was the company’s big move. Nvidia is guaranteed to give chase sooner than later. And then we’ll have a race.

Based on what we know about the speed of GF110 versus Cayman, in a vacuum, Nvidia has a distinct performance advantage. But its thermal boundaries with that chip are even more pronounced than AMD’s. So, milking more speed out of a dual-GPU card without running head-first into the same cooling/noise wall will be a real challenge.

Should Nvidia choose to cool its card like the Radeon HD 6990, it’ll make chassis choice and cooling fan orientation a real pain in the butt for boutique builders and do-it-yourselfers alike. In that case, we’re probably looking at another situation where four GPUs in the same machine will be problematic. Hopefully, Nvidia sees the situation AMD is dealing with today and reevaluates the decision to let professional builders and enthusiasts figure out how to cope with the heat pushed out the front and back of its products. I'm not going to take "buy a Cooler Master HAF 932" as the only acceptable solution for integrating hardware that could have been engineered to cope with thermal output more intelligently.

We Have A Better Solution

Given almost-embarrassing fan steppings, multiple attempts at functioning CrossFire profiles, driver anomalies, and a general reluctance to talk about the logistics of actually selling the Radeon HD 6990, I get the sense that AMD rushed this launch. Marketing 101: it’s better to claim first-place today and possibly get passed up tomorrow than have to launch a second-place card tomorrow.

So, we end up with a flagship board that is undeniably fast. It’d really be an all-out rock star if performance were our only consideration. As it sits, though, heat and noise are this card’s enemies in the same way they plagued Nvidia’s GeForce GTX 480.

Those detractors might even be forgivable if there weren’t better options available. Let’s just assume two of these in quad-CrossFire isn’t even an option for most people, and you’re looking at the best possible way to leverage two GPUs. A pair of Radeon HD 6970s sacrifices nothing except space in your case. That combo is faster, quieter, and more effective at dealing with heat. A pair of GeForce GTX 570s would be a great alternative, too. You give up a bit of speed in some situations, but they’re even quieter than the 6970s.

And as I write this, one day ahead of the launch, AMD refuses to comment on pricing. There’s also no official word on when enthusiasts will see the 6990 available to buy. We’re not worried, though. Skip the Radeon HD 6990 altogether and take advantage of fantastic CrossFire and SLI scaling using more elegant single-GPU cards. 

Update: Hours before launching the Radeon HD 6990, we're happy to report that AMD decided on a price: $699. That's $20 higher than a pair of Radeon HD 6970s, not counting $40 worth of rebates. AMD counts the three adapters bundled with the 6990 as a $60 value, but we maintain that the two single-GPU boards in CrossFire are a superior choice.

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  • -2 Hide
    hayest , March 8, 2011 3:34 AM
    Killer Card!

    Out of spec for default seems kind of weird though.
  • -2 Hide
    CrazeEAdrian , March 8, 2011 3:37 AM
    Great job AMD. You need to expect noise and heat when dealing with a card that beasts out that kind of performance, it's part of the territory.
  • 7 Hide
    jprahman , March 8, 2011 3:40 AM
    This thing is a monster, 375W TDP, 4GB of VRAM! Some people don't even have 4GB of regular RAM in their systems, let alone on their video card.
  • 1 Hide
    one-shot , March 8, 2011 3:43 AM
    Did I miss the load power draw? I just noticed the idle and noise ratings. It would be informative to see the power draw of Crossfire 6990s and overclocked i7. I see the graph, but a chart with CPU only and GPU only followed by a combination of both would be nice to see.
  • 0 Hide
    anacandor , March 8, 2011 3:44 AM
    For the people that actually buy this card, i'm sure they'll be able to afford an aftermarket cooler for this thing once they come out...
  • 0 Hide
    wino85 , March 8, 2011 3:46 AM
    OMG!!! It's finally here.
  • 0 Hide
    cangelini , March 8, 2011 3:48 AM
    one-shotDid I miss the load power draw? I just noticed the idle and noise ratings. It would be informative to see the power draw of Crossfire 6990s and overclocked i7. I see the graph, but a chart with CPU only and GPU only followed by a combination of both would be nice to see.


    We don't have two cards here to test, unfortunately. The logged load results for a single card are on the same page, though!
  • -1 Hide
    bombat1994 , March 8, 2011 3:52 AM
    things we need to see are this thing water cooled.

    and tested at 7680 x 1600

    that will see just how well it does.

    That thing is an absolute monster of a card.

    They really should have made it 32nm. then the power draw would have fallen below 300w and the thing would be cooler.

    STILL NICE WORK AMD
  • -1 Hide
    Bigmac80 , March 8, 2011 3:53 AM
    Pretty fast i wonder if this will be cheaper then 2 GTX 570's or 2 6950's?
    But omg this thing is freakin loud. What's the point of having a quite system now with Noctua fans :( 
  • 2 Hide
    tacoslave , March 8, 2011 3:54 AM
    Its hot, sucks alot of power, and costs a ton. But i still want one.








    Badly
  • 7 Hide
    lashton , March 8, 2011 3:54 AM
    AMD doesn't care about noise because they are waiting for custom colling solutions from OEM
  • -1 Hide
    lashton , March 8, 2011 3:56 AM
    bombat1994things we need to see are this thing water cooled.and tested at 7680 x 1600that will see just how well it does.That thing is an absolute monster of a card.They really should have made it 32nm. then the power draw would have fallen below 300w and the thing would be cooler.STILL NICE WORK AMD

    That maybe possible when they get 28nm ready on bulldozer, they are just raping the rewards of old tech.
  • 1 Hide
    scrumworks , March 8, 2011 4:01 AM
    Starts with negative comments (noise), so no surprises from Chris. Fermi of course never made so much noise and consume so much power that would require this type commenting. Everything was Power, PhysX and CUDA!
  • 0 Hide
    4745454b , March 8, 2011 4:03 AM
    Meh. To much for what it is. The only thing it does better then two 6970s is in power. (if one 6970 is 250W and this is 375W, then it uses less power then 2x6970.) But I agree that you're better off with a CF setup. Like the GTX480 and possibly the GTX580, its simply to much for what you pay for.

    Edit: I should say its either to much or to little and always in the wrong way for what you pay for. I also dislike the the 375W TDP. We have specs/rules for a reason.
  • 0 Hide
    Haserath , March 8, 2011 4:04 AM
    I think AMD will have the performance monster this round. It would be surprising if Nvidia was anticipating something like this. The GTX 570 already uses quite a few more Watts than the 6970; what will they do to match two 6970's on one board?
    This is isanity!
  • 0 Hide
    megamanx00 , March 8, 2011 4:14 AM
    OMFG!!!!

    Well, I guess if you were thinking of running 3, or even 6 displays (which would require at least one hub or daisy chain monitor), this is the card you would want, perhaps even two of them. I'm guessing if you put two of them in you really really want it water cooled.
  • 0 Hide
    MasterMace , March 8, 2011 4:14 AM
    Careful, you may not be able to here a tornado siren a mile away with this one.
  • -1 Hide
    nforce4max , March 8, 2011 4:17 AM
    Well at least it is cheaper than the two 7900gtx duos (eom) that landed some years after introduction. Personally I wouldn't purchase this card knowing the driver bugs and the usual issues that dual gpu cards have except I'll wait a few years to snatch one up on the cheap as a collectors item. For those who got the money wait at least two or three weeks for reviews and complaints by owners of this card before you buy one. I can live with the noise but bad drivers I can't.
  • 4 Hide
    cangelini , March 8, 2011 4:45 AM
    scrumworksStarts with negative comments (noise), so no surprises from Chris. Fermi of course never made so much noise and consume so much power that would require this type commenting. Everything was Power, PhysX and CUDA!


    LOL. Look at the power AND noise graphs, scrum :) 
  • 3 Hide
    dragonsqrrl , March 8, 2011 4:45 AM
    It looks like the improved CrossFireX scaling introduced with the HD6000 series really helps the HD6990 shine. There's no question about it, this thing's a top of the line performance beast.

    The big (and really inexcusable) problem is the noise, and to a lesser extent power consumption. It's by far the loudest single card stock cooler ever conceived, and that's taking into account the former champions, the GTX480 and HD5970. The load temps aren't great, but they're acceptable in my opinion. I'm not sure what people were expecting, but this is an extreme high-end dual GPU card, and load temps in the upper 80's C aren't uncommon in this performance segment. The problem is once again the excessive noise that's generated in order to keep the 2 GPU's running at those already high temps.

    I totally agree with the reviewer, the HD6990 seems rushed, the drivers are buggy, and if running a fan at 3k+ RPM is the only way to keep a card operating, it probably needs a little more tweaking before release.

    lashtonThat maybe possible when they get 28nm ready on bulldozer, they are just raping the rewards of old tech.

    Bulldozer will be manufactured using Global Foundries 32nm process, not 28. The node shrink you're referring to for next-gen GPU's will be manufactured using a completely different 28nm process at TSMC. AMD uses Golbal Foundries only for its CPU's at this time.
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