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Specs on Intel Celeron Sandy Bridge CPUs Leaked

Previous reports revealed that Intel plans to launch three new Celeron "Sandy Bridge" processors sometime during Q3 2011. Based on a leaked roadmap slide, the processors were branded as the Celeron G440, the G530 and the G540 but yielded little else in regards to core info, clock speeds and whatnot. Now unnamed sources have released additional detals to offer a better insight into what will hit the market later this year.

Out of the three processors, the Celeron G530 and G540 will have two cores and the ability to execute two threads at once. Both will feature integrated graphics with a base frequency of 850 MHz and a turbo frequency of 1 GHz when necessary. They'll also have 2 MB of L3 cache and a TDP of 64 watts. The only difference between the two is that the G530 will clock at 2.4 GHz and the G540 will clock at 2.5 GHz.

As for the third processor, the low-power Celeron G440 will feature a single-threaded, single core clocked at 1.6 GHz. The integrated graphics will still have the same 1 GHz turbo as its dual-core brothers, but feature a lower base clock of 650 MHz. It will also have the same 2 MB of L3 cache but a much lower TDP of 35 watts.

Earlier today VIA introduced the VIA QuadCore, its new quad-core processor with a TDP of only 27.5 watts. Initially it will be available clocked at 1.2+ GHz and come packed with 4 MB of L2 cache, Adaptive Overclocking and a 1333 MHz V4 Bus. It will also feature native support for 64-bit operating systems.

That said, the new Celeron chips will also feature 64-bit instructions and VT-x virtualization thanks to utilizing the Sandy Bridge core architecture. They'll even arrive in LGA1155 packages. But what's unknown at this point is when these chips will actually launch and for how much. It's possible we'll know more about the Celerons at Computex later this month, so stay tuned.

  • kjsfnkwl
    These look like they might be some nice chips to use for an HTPC, I'd like to see their MSRPs. I like how they brought back the "Celeron" series name.

    Sort of off topic, but I think it would be cool if Intel named it's next series of processors "Pentium V"
    Reply
  • therealcold187
    Why do they waste time making these slow processors? Amd has this corner as they can't compete with the i5-2500k or the i7-2700k. AMD needs the slower market to stay in buisness as there graphic cards are great but there cpu are just to old and slow. I bet there gpu are faster then there cpu! LOL
    Reply
  • Darkerson
    Doubtful, they seem to have wanted to distance themselves from the Pentium name after the whole deal with the Pentium IV being crap near the end of its life compared to what AMD had at the time with the Athlon64, or at least thats how I look at it.
    Reply
  • therealcold187
    I buy Intel CPU and AMD Grapic cards so I don't hate AMD they just don't make good CPU any more. The last AMD processor I bought was a AMD Athlon XP 3200+ back when the P4 were crap but now Intel has left AMD in the dust and I see no chance of AMD coming back into the game.
    Reply
  • applegetsmelaid
    I always thought it was funny when people would call it the "exceleron" ;)
    Reply
  • fullofzen
    I strongly doubt that they would bring back the Pentium name after all these years. It just sounds...old.

    Celeron, on the other hand -- the line has a reputation for value performance at a low cost. Everyone understands -- or thinks they understand -- what they're getting.

    I'm no branding expert, but that's my take on it...
    Reply
  • jednx01
    I'm more interested in what intel has coming down the pipe on the high end computing spectrum... :)
    Reply
  • fullofzen
    otacon72Bulldozer probably had a chance if it was released last summer. But now that Sandybridge is out with Sandybridge-E by the fall and Ivy is knocking on the door too AMD will never compete in the high end CPU market again. Bulldozer will already be at least one generation behind by the time it comes out.
    It will be exciting to see what actually ends up happening. I don't think that no one really has information on Bulldozer's performance -- I think most people that say Bulldozer will be a generation behind are saying that just because AMD's current line performs so poorly in comparison to Sandy Bridge.

    I think it's just a bit too pessimistic to suggest that AMD doesn't know how to design chips just because Sandy Bridge has done so well. AMD can always come from behind -- just like they did with Athlon 64 -- and just like Intel did with Core 2.

    Until the benches come out, anyone that makes statements like "Bulldozer will already be at least one generation behind by the time it comes out." is just pulling that assessment from the wild blue yonder...
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  • apache_lives
    therealcold187I buy Intel CPU and AMD Grapic cards so I don't hate AMD they just don't make good CPU any more. The last AMD processor I bought was a AMD Athlon XP 3200+ back when the P4 were crap but now Intel has left AMD in the dust and I see no chance of AMD coming back into the game.
    The 2.8C Intel P4 NORTHWOOD was better then that 3200+ you had at the time, hell the 2.4C even got some better results.

    We all forget that although we are educated and aware of how crap the Pentium 4's and Pentium D's BECAME (the northwood was fine if anyone remembers this, prescott/smithfield/cedarmill etc is where it all went wrong with 90nm leakage), millions were still sold and thought highly of, the general public still bought more Intels and used them (alot of people still use them today).
    Reply
  • wild9
    therealcold187I buy Intel CPU and AMD Grapic cards so I don't hate AMD they just don't make good CPU any more. The last AMD processor I bought was a AMD Athlon XP 3200+ back when the P4 were crap but now Intel has left AMD in the dust and I see no chance of AMD coming back into the game.But AMD continues to sell these devices in volume, so they must be doing something right. Also, that Athlon XP 3200+ being your last AMD CPU..that's a really old product (I had a 3000+ too and recall trying to spread thermal paste on that tiny core lol). I'd recommend using a Phenom II. If the Phenom II is out the race, then so is Core 2/ i3/i5..because that's what it's competing with. Someone recently asked me to build them a GTA IV rig and the results show the Phenom II x4 was kicking some serious FPS, putting it near or even at the top of the pile and for a very good price.

    Then there's AMD's longevity. The Phenom II is also compatible with old boards dating back to the AM2+ socket era, boards that have chipsets like the AMD 785G with it's very good multimedia capabilities. All this at a good price, allowing you to build a system on shoe-string, one that can easily cope with a lot of today's software demands.

    People might slag off AMD, but it's AMD parts that drive the competition. I myself still use AMD products and have no reservations regarding performance, stability or power efficiency. I can get a board and choose from a wide variety of parts, from ultra-low power devices to 6-core monsters. All with minimal downtime. With clients, what I save in not splashing out on the latest Intel CPU's, I pass onto other areas: power supplies, memory and quality case fans.

    I really don't see the point in rushing out to buy a controversial socket technology just because it's the fastest..it will no doubt be replaced by something that's faster. AMD may be competing on price more than it is with top-of-the-range performance, but I think that is playing it smart especially when you look at the great advances AMD has made in other areas such as GPU and APU technology. I know AMD is not the performance king, but neither are a lot of Intel systems..people still seem perfectly happy to use them :) I also think AMD is coming back in a big way, by developing several technologies rather than just focusing on one technology alone.
    Reply