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AMD's Bugfix for Ryzen Stuttering Now Widely Available

MPG X570 Gaming Pro Carbon WiFi
(Image credit: MSI)

It's now June of 2022, and AMD's new AGESA 1207 microcode has made it to the vast majority of AM4 motherboards on the market - both old and new. This update includes fixes for the infamous fTPM stuttering bug and includes full Ryzen 5000 series CPU support on all older generation AM4 motherboards, including the 300 series and 400 series. Here is a breakdown of the current situation with AGESA 1207 and how motherboard vendors are implementing it.

But before we start, here's a quick rundown on the situation with the microcode bug AGESA 1207 fixes. In March, AMD announced that it had identified a severe stuttering issue on Ryzen systems that was solely related to the Trusted Platform Module. The issue would cause Ryzen systems to stutter or freeze temporarily. The problem is made even worse because TPM support is mandatory for Windows 11.

It's also worth noting that the early USB issues plaguing Ryzen platforms have been fixed since the AGESA 1.2.0.2 microcode update went live earlier this year. So if your board did not come with a 1.2.0.2 patch (or others such as 1.2.0.5 and 1.2.0.6b), AGESA 1.2.0.7 does include this additional hotfix.

Even if you don't plan on upgrading to a Ryzen 5000 CPU, updating your BIOS to the latest microcode from AMD can still be worth the effort to kill off these long-term issues.

Pre-Cautions When Updating To BETA BIOS Revisions Packing AGESA 1.2.0.7

For users planning on upgrading to AGESA 1.2.0.7 on an older 300 series or 400 series motherboard, there are some extra necessary precautions to consider.

A lot of these older motherboards that are receiving the new AGESA update are getting them in the form of beta BIOS updates. Unfortunately, these beta BIOS' are only partially tested, unlike official BIOS revisions. As a result, you could encounter some additional bugs when installing a beta BIOS.

But, on the flip side, any additional issues should be pretty rare since the only changes happening with most of these beta BIOS is the CPU microcode update, and that's it. For what it is worth, I have installed a beta BIOS packing AGESA 1.2.0.7 on my personal MSI B450 Pro Carbon AC (with the cut-down BIOS), and I've had zero issues with it at all, and it runs great.

Another thing you might have to do is incrementally upgrade your BIOS to the latest version. Some boards require this and will prevent you from skipping BIOS updates when necessary. Just beware that this is normal and not a bug.

For more details on properly preparing for a BIOS update, I highly recommend reading this Reddit post from Asus. It is a very detailed tutorial on best practices when updating your BIOS.

ASRock

Out of all the motherboard vendors currently, ASRock is the most unpredictable regarding the new AGESA 1207 updates. Boards you would never expect to have official BIOS updates have it, and boards you would expect to have it officially either don't and/or have it in a beta BIOS instead.

Nonetheless, most of ASRock's motherboard lineup, from the bottom A320M to top-of-the-line X570S do pack AGESA 1207, whether in beta or non-beta format.

A320 motherboards are ironically the most loved out of the entire AM4 lineup. Almost all these boards have AGESA 1207 as an official BIOS update, with only a couple featuring beta support and some more which don't have it at all, but they are few.

B350 shows a similar format, but it's more mixed in terms of beta and official BIOS updates depending on the model. Just one B350 model lacks 1207 entirely.

Almost all ASRock X370 models feature 1207 in beta and non-beta bios formats. Just a couple of boards lack the update, specifically one of them being the bitcoin mining optimized board.

Unfortunately, B450 support is not great at this time. With only some motherboards getting AGESA 1207 in beta BIOS format right now.

It's even worse with X470, with no ASRock models getting AGESA 1207 at this time.

Contrary to A320, A520 boards right now have less support for 1207. With just over half of ASRock's Models receiving 1207 in beta bios format only.

All B550 motherboards except for a single model have the 1207 update in beta format alone.

Most X570 boards have AGESA 1207, but like B550, only in a beta BIOS format, with some lacking it entirely for some reason. The only X570S motherboard in ASRock's arsenal, the Riptide does feature AGESA 1207 though.

Asus

Asus has made it incredibly easy to see which 500 series boards already have the new AGESA 1207 release, with full motherboard support listed here on Reddit. But we had to check Asus' website for older 400 and 300 series chipset boards.

Unfortunately, Asus no longer features a support page on most of its A320 motherboards for some strange reason. But of the two boards we could find, they do offer AGESA 1207 BIOS updates. So we presume that is the case with the rest of the models.

For B350, the same behavior occurs on Asus' website. Not every motherboard has a support page available to see, but on the ones that do, they all support AGESA 1207. So we can assume that is the case with the rest of the B350 boards.

X370 is a real head-scratcher for Asus boards. All the flagship ROG boards do not feature AGESA 1207 support, with some only featuring a beta bios upgrade to the previous 1.2.0.6b microcode update. The mid-range and entry-level X370 boards, meanwhile, all get official 1207 bios updates.

B450 support is decent but not great, with just half of Asus' B450 lineup featuring the 1207 bios update.

X470 sees the same strange behavior as X370 boards, with all the lower-end and mid-range options getting the 1207 update, but the flagship ROG model doesn't have it.

Check out Asus' reddit post for 500 series support, but spoiler alert, basically all of them are supported.

MSI

MSI is one of the strongest vendors supporting AGESA 1207, with effectively all its motherboards supporting the new microcode either in official or beta bios formats. 

A320: All boards feature 1207 support in both official and beta bios format except one model.

B350: Again, 1207 compatibility is excellent with MSI's entire B350 lineup. All boards get it in beta BIOS format. The only exception is one model, like A320.

X370 support is very good, with all but one board getting the 1207 update as a beta bios update. Strangely the one board missing support is the M7 ACK, one of MSI's top-of-the-line boards.

As for the 400 series, including B450 and X470, all of MSI's models in this lineup support the AGESA 1207 update as either beta BIOS updates or official ones.

The same also applies to the 500 series for the most part. All A520 and X570/X570S boards get the 1207 update in beta and official BIOS variants. The only exception is MSI's B550 boards, of which only a couple are missing the update.

Gigabyte

Out of the four most popular AM4 motherboard manufacturers, Gigabyte sits on top with the strongest support of the AGESA 1207 update. All 300 series, 400 series and 500 series motherboards have the update as official BIOS updates, with no beta BIOS variants available. Only one A520 board does not have the update, and that's it.

Biostar:

Biostar is also very strong, with almost all of its 300, 400 and 500 series AM4 motherboards officially getting the AGESA 1207 update. The only drawback with Biostar is its B350 support which is weak, with only half of its models supporting the new 1207 update. But, just like Gigabyte, all updates are official (i.e., no beta).

EVGA

EVGA only has two AM4 motherboards at this time, the X570 Dark and FTW, but they do both support AGESA 1207 officially.

These are the results of the most popular motherboard vendors making AM4 motherboards. There are other brands out there, but we have neglected to add them to the list due to time constraints.

Overall, AGESA 1207 has officially made it to nearly all relevant AM4 motherboards on the market today. Now is the perfect time to upgrade if you own AMD Ryzen system.

Aaron Klotz
Aaron Klotz

Aaron Klotz is a freelance writer for Tom’s Hardware US, covering news topics related to computer hardware such as CPUs, and graphics cards.

  • Josh Mahurin
    "Out of the four most popular AM4 motherboard manufacturers, Gigabyte sits on top with the strongest support of the AGESA 1207 update. Only one A520 board does not have the update, and that's it. "

    And of course I have an A520. Looks like mine has it though. Got worried. Looks like it's only the GA-A520I-DASH that doesn't have it yet.
    Reply
  • btmedic04
    The Asus Rog Strix x370-F Gaming currently in use in my moms computer has an official bios with the 1.2.0.7 agesa present. Ill be upgrading her ryzen 7 1700 to a ryzen 5 5600 soon
    Reply
  • Rockett
    I can't speak for all the others but all of gigabytes bios releases so far with AGESA 1.2.0.7 are betas (A letter after the version number denotes this) People are also still reporting the stutter despite having updated to the beta bios with AGESA 1.2.0.7 with their gigabyte motherboards.

    I am personally waiting for a non beta release before I update my x570 aorus master to the latest bios version to see if some peoples claims that the fTPM stutter isnt fixed are true.

    I think you made a typo in the article, all of the gigabyte bios releases for AGESA 1.2.0.7 are beta releases so far.
    Reply
  • Sleepy_Hollowed
    I broke down and found an actual TPM module that was flat (didn't hit the GPU, since it's directly under it), and while I had to run an official microcode update on the mobo from the manufacturer on an engineering, last minute-made pdf, it worked, but hopefully this makes it to everyone, it was indeed happening enough so that it did bother game timing while playing.
    Reply
  • -Fran-
    Still waiting on Asus for it. My Crosshair VII still running 1.2.0.6b 8(

    The other board I have for the HTPC already has the update. Not that it needed it, but update!

    Regards.
    Reply
  • javiindo
    Thanks. I have updated and it looks stable now.
    Reply
  • wifiburger
    " Bugfix for Ryzen Stuttering Now Widely Available"

    worthless, agesa 1.2.0.7 is crap for stablity and overclocks; most are just ignoring this crap agesa from AMD
    Reply
  • WhiteSnake91
    I had a faulty motherboard that wouldn't accept a newer bios update that was any newer than Aug 2021 without insta BSOD/shutting the pc off before the w10 login screen, or insta crashing/freezing the entire pc once the desktop loaded....bought a new b450 asus mobo and it accepted the new bios, although was still doing the random stuttering fps drop lagging crap in games...pulled CMOS, then it seemed to work and games have been better. Didn't really feel like spending a ton on a motherboard when am4 is EOL anyway

    One thing that sucks is, my fps is about 30-40fps lower testing Fortnite, although, they did just have a total new map overhaul and season come out so it could very well be less optimized, I'm really unsure. It sucks not knowing 100% if it's an unoptimized game or if something is wrong elsewhere. Before, I was getting ~120-130fps on 1440p mostly epic settings with shadows set to high, except with the horrible random stuttering that was driving me mad since my 3700x, 32gb ram, and 3070 gaming pc is more than good enough for high refresh 1440p gaming. I did extensive testing for a long time testing different stuff out until Asus customer support told me about the Ryzen fTPM problem going around that I didn't even know about. I consider myself a techie compared to most people, but, don't really keep up with every little news story every day.

    I'm assuming some w10 update messed with the fTPM stuff that started all this crap, since, games didn't used to stutter and lag. I'm not on w11, and don't plan on being on it begrudgingly until w10 support ends, have heard and read wayyyyy too many bad things about 11 to want to deal with that headache until a few more years have passed for them to iron out the problems. Weird that it only affected Ryzens apparently. If the new mobo and bios didn't fix stuff I was ready in a heartbeat to switch to a i5 12400 6 core 12 thread 12th gen intel, I never ended up streaming like I thought I would so the 3700x threads didn't really help me much. I'd wager even a 10th gen 6c/12t i5 would be fine for this whole PS5/Xbox Series X|S console gen. Streaming encoding can be offloaded to the gpu these days anyway too. Words truly cannot describe how much frustration and trouble this stuttering crap caused me. It really sucked not having a 2nd pc to test stuff on and troubleshoot. I guess I took having a modern (at the time) ddr3 secondary system in years prior for granted. I've now acquired enough parts to Frankenstein together a modern ddr4 secondary system.

    Here's to hoping some other windows update doesn't mess something else up causing horrible stuttering despite strong pc specs. I sure miss the days of stone cold reliable set it and forget it Sandy/Ivy bridge on w7.
    Reply
  • Sleepy_Hollowed
    WhiteSnake91 said:
    I had a faulty motherboard that wouldn't accept a newer bios update that was any newer than Aug 2021 without insta BSOD/shutting the pc off before the w10 login screen, or insta crashing/freezing the entire pc once the desktop loaded....bought a new b450 asus mobo and it accepted the new bios, although was still doing the random stuttering fps drop lagging crap in games...pulled CMOS, then it seemed to work and games have been better. Didn't really feel like spending a ton on a motherboard when am4 is EOL anyway

    One thing that sucks is, my fps is about 30-40fps lower testing Fortnite, although, they did just have a total new map overhaul and season come out so it could very well be less optimized, I'm really unsure. It sucks not knowing 100% if it's an unoptimized game or if something is wrong elsewhere. Before, I was getting ~120-130fps on 1440p mostly epic settings with shadows set to high, except with the horrible random stuttering that was driving me mad since my 3700x, 32gb ram, and 3070 gaming pc is more than good enough for high refresh 1440p gaming. I did extensive testing for a long time testing different stuff out until Asus customer support told me about the Ryzen fTPM problem going around that I didn't even know about. I consider myself a techie compared to most people, but, don't really keep up with every little news story every day.

    I'm assuming some w10 update messed with the fTPM stuff that started all this crap, since, games didn't used to stutter and lag. I'm not on w11, and don't plan on being on it begrudgingly until w10 support ends, have heard and read wayyyyy too many bad things about 11 to want to deal with that headache until a few more years have passed for them to iron out the problems. Weird that it only affected Ryzens apparently. If the new mobo and bios didn't fix stuff I was ready in a heartbeat to switch to a i5 12400 6 core 12 thread 12th gen intel, I never ended up streaming like I thought I would so the 3700x threads didn't really help me much. I'd wager even a 10th gen 6c/12t i5 would be fine for this whole PS5/Xbox Series X|S console gen. Streaming encoding can be offloaded to the gpu these days anyway too. Words truly cannot describe how much frustration and trouble this stuttering crap caused me. It really sucked not having a 2nd pc to test stuff on and troubleshoot. I guess I took having a modern (at the time) ddr3 secondary system in years prior for granted. I've now acquired enough parts to Frankenstein together a modern ddr4 secondary system.

    Here's to hoping some other windows update doesn't mess something else up causing horrible stuttering despite strong pc specs. I sure miss the days of stone cold reliable set it and forget it Sandy/Ivy bridge on w7.

    If you're in windows 10 and don't need an ftpm for anything (bitlocker, boot anti-malware, saving hardware keys for UEFI for some custom use case for example), just disable the fTPM.

    On windows 11, that's another story altogether because you need it, and although you can turn it off after installing it, it defeats the FINALLY revealed security feature from ever working without a reinstall: https://www.techspot.com/news/94088-new-windows-11-security-feature-requires-clean-install.html
    Reply
  • keith12
    wifiburger said:
    " Bugfix for Ryzen Stuttering Now Widely Available"

    worthless, agesa 1.2.0.7 is crap for stablity and overclocks; most are just ignoring this crap agesa from AMD
    Agree with you there.

    For my Asus B550 Prime, my settings wouldn't allow all core clocks above 4.4ghz and max single core 4.75. Back on previous bios and now my 4.65 all core and 4.85ghz on one or two cores is back.
    Reply