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Early AGESA Versions Responsible For Possible Ryzen 7000 Delayed Release

AM5 Socket
(Image credit: AMD)

For unknown reasons, previous rumors have indicated that Ryzen 7000's release date could get postponed from September 15th to the 27th. But now, according to a report by HardwareLuxx, (opens in new tab) we know why. AMD is reportedly dealing with AGESA issues on the motherboard side, which will be the main culprit for the postponed release date if it becomes official.

Unfortunately, HardwareLuxx says it was not given a reason (by its source) why the AGESA microcode is at fault.

If you are unfamiliar with AGESA, it is effectively AMD's core firmware for all its modern motherboards and microprocessors. As a result, AGESA is a critical aspect of all Ryzen systems today. Unfortunately, bugs about AGESA can destroy system stability and prevent critical components from functioning correctly, such as USB ports, memory, PCIe busses, clock speeds, power delivery, etc.

It is easy to guess why AMD is having such difficulty with its low-level motherboard software. AM5 is a brand new motherboard architecture, housing new connectivity standards for AMD, such as DDR5 and PCIe 5.0, as well as brand new chipset designs. All in all, testing every single nook and cranny of brand new system architecture is difficult (if not impossible) to do under time constraints.

It is why almost all brand new platforms from Intel and AMD have "game breaking" bugs on launch day, due to the developer and engineering inexperience with bleeding-edge architectures.

Nonetheless, AMD needs to provide a "bare minimum" level of stability on day 1 of release. If this condition cannot be met, the release window needs to be pushed forward to prevent the platform from collapsing in users' hands.

With evidence for both a rumored release day postponement for Ryzen 7000 and major AM5 motherboard software issues simultaneously, we suspect there is a high chance AMD will probably move the release date to the 27th. Hopefully, it doesn't come to that, but it is better to be safe than sorry.

Aaron Klotz
Freelance News Writer

Aaron Klotz is a freelance writer for Tom’s Hardware US, covering news topics related to computer hardware such as CPUs, and graphics cards.

  • Makaveli
    Which is fine to me I would prefer a delay to smooth out AGESA as much as possible for a launch of a new gen.

    Everyone can wait 2 weeks.
    Reply
  • InvalidError
    Makaveli said:
    Everyone can wait 2 weeks.
    If I was in the market for a new PC, which I'm not, I definitely wouldn't want to be back in the 300-like situation where it took several months from launch for AMD to sort out most memory compatibility issues and a year beyond that for most boards with particularly problematic obsolete BIOS versions to get cleaned out of the market.

    I tend to buy near the end of a product cycle where most major gotchas have hopefully been worked out.
    Reply
  • TheJoker2020
    And / Or it could be because AMD has found out the (paper) launch date of Raptor Lake and is delaying until after Intel has (paper) launched a couple of top end models, and AMD will then (hard) launch the entire lineup of desktop CPU's.!
    Reply
  • spongiemaster
    TheJoker2020 said:
    And / Or it could be because AMD has found out the (paper) launch date of Raptor Lake and is delaying until after Intel has (paper) launched a couple of top end models, and AMD will then (hard) launch the entire lineup of desktop CPU's.!
    Alder Lake's launch was the best stocked launch since covid hit. Raptor Lake is the same node with some extra cache and other tweaks a year later. There's not reason to believe Intel will be paper launching.
    Reply
  • Makaveli
    InvalidError said:

    I tend to buy near the end of a product cycle where most major gotchas have hopefully been worked out.

    You are a smart man I also skip first generation products.

    I started AM4 on X570 for this reason.

    And if I were to move from this it would be with Zen 4 refresh.
    Reply
  • TheJoker2020
    spongiemaster said:
    Alder Lake's launch was the best stocked launch since covid hit. Raptor Lake is the same node with some extra cache and other tweaks a year later. There's not reason to believe Intel will be paper launching.
    I watch the videos on the YouTube channel "mooreslawisdead", they seem to get far more right than most, including the previous launch date of the Ryzen 7000 series, and much more. They are saying that only the top end Raptor Lake CPU's will be launched to start with, and that they will paper launch before a hard launch, and that the bulk of the desktop Raptor Lake SKU's wont be "available" until late in the year or early next year.

    Whilst AMD will hard launch the entire lineup at once.!

    Seeing as the AMD Ryzen 7000 launch seems to have been delayed a couple of weeks (according to this rumour), and the "presentation" by Lisa Su is already booked, it seems that AMD will now paper launch, and then hard launch a couple of weeks later.! This "might" mean that the NDA's for all of the benchmarkers and reviewers will also be delayed, otherwise their reviews will be made on an older AGESA version than the launching products, and this will make the reviews look worse than they should.!

    Like all of these launches, there are a million things going on simultaneously, everything is fluid to some degree, and we will find out a whole lot more in the next few days. These kinds of launches (platform) are always fun for us nerds...
    Reply
  • -Fran-
    The only two things that come to mind are DDR5 memory shenanigans (new IMC and all) and the recent security findings that would put their SMT implementation under risk, so I'm sure they'd want that fleshed out?

    Other than that, nothing else comes to mind. Well, except the usual "oh, this stream of instructions hard locks the CPU!" type of problems, lol.

    Regards.
    Reply