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AIDA64 Adds Support for Next-Gen AMD Ryzen 4000 CPUs, Renoir APUs

(Image credit: Alexander Safonov/Shutterstock)

AIDA64, a popular system information and monitoring utility, has added support for AMD's upcoming Renoir APUsand preliminary support for fourth-generation Ryzen desktop CPUs. This may be a hint that early samples of both silicon are already out in the wild.

AMD has done a remarkable job of shifting the majority of its products on the new 7nm process node. Its APUs are currently the only parts still stuck on the previous 12nm process. However, Renoir should change that. AMD's next generation of APUs are likely to be based on the Zen 2 microarchitecture and 7nm process, just like the chipmaker's current processor lineup. As APUs, the chips will come with integrated graphics, and it seems AMD's Renoir APUs will cling to the Vega microachitecture.

AIDA64 6.20.5300 Release Notes

AIDA64 6.20.5300 release notes (Image credit: FinalWire Ltd.)

AMD just launched its Ryzen 3000-series CPUs a few months ago, which are based on Zen 2 and 7nm manufacturing process. Its next generation of chips are expected to be based off a Zen 3 microarchitecture and an improved 7nm+ process. We're also expecting the fourth-generation Ryzen desktop processors to carry Ryzen 4000-series branding. Vermeer is the rumored codename for the upcoming chips.

Both Renoir and Vermeer are rumored to touch ground next year. In the last AMD earnings call, AMD CEO Dr. Lisa Su confirmed that new 7nm mobile chips will debut in early 2020. There's a high probability that AMD might announce Renoir at CES 2020 in January. As for Vermeer, we expect to see those chips later next year, probably around summer time.

  • Gillerer
    I'd like to point out that APUs are in fact not "the only parts still stuck on the 12nm process".

    Despite releasing 3rd generation Threadripper, AMD has stated it will continue to manufacture and sell the previous 2nd generation Threadripper parts for budget-conscious customers requiring lots of I/O.

    This allows AMD to have HEDT offerings competing with Intel's now sub-$1k parts.
    Reply
  • TJ Hooker
    Gillerer said:
    I'd like to point out that APUs are in fact not "the only parts still stuck on the 12nm process".

    Despite releasing 3rd generation Threadripper, AMD has stated it will continue to manufacture and sell the previous 2nd generation Threadripper parts for budget-conscious customers requiring lots of I/O.

    This allows AMD to have HEDT offerings competing with Intel's now sub-$1k parts.
    I don't see anything wrong with that statement. Their latest mainstream CPUs are 7nm, their latest HEDT CPUs are 7nm, their latest GPUs are 7nm. APUs are the only products not yet available on 7nm.
    Reply