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Ryzen 9 3900X Prices Have Gone Up Roughly 16 Percent Amidst Shortage (Updated)

Update 9/28/2019 6:00am PT: AMD responded and confirmed that it hasn't raised the official pricing for the Ryzen 9 3900X, meaning that these price hikes are solely at the discretion of retailers.

Original article 9/27/2019 11:14am PT:

AMD's Ryzen 9 3900X processor, which debuted in July with a $499 MSRP, is now selling for $569.99 at Amazon and Micro Center and as high as $579.99 at Newegg.

(Image credit: Newegg)

Computer hardware, like any other consumer product, conforms to the law of supply and demand. What's pretty intriguing is that the Ryzen 9 3900X has gone up in price in a little more than three month's time since the chip's release, and though we've already seen extreme price gouging on eBay and other third-party sellers, now retail outlets have also raised prices. It looks like AMD's supply of Ryzen 9 3900X is starting to run dry, which is evident since the 12-core part is practically out of stock at the majority of the major retailers. With TSMC's recent struggles to meet the high 7nm demands, it's probably going to take some time before the Ryzen 9 3900X's price starts to stabilize.

(Image credit: Micro Center)

At this moment, the prices for the Ryzen 9 3900X are all over the place. Amazon and even Microcenter, who is known to sell processors at lower prices than the competition, list the Ryzen 9 3900X with a $569.99 price tag, which is $70.99 over its MSRP. This works out to a 14.22% increase in price. Newegg has the Ryzen 9 3900X at $579.99 while B&H Photo Video is rolling with $529.99. Best Buy is the only retailer to maintain AMD's recommended pricing for the 12-core, 24-thread processor, but it's possible the retailer hasn't updated the pricing yet.

RetailerPricing% Increase Over MSRP
Newegg$579.9916.23%
Amazon, Micro Center $569.9914.22%
B&H Photo Video$529.996.21%
Best Buy$499.99-

There are two possible explanations for the price discrepancy between the different retailers. Either the retailers are increasing their prices to take advantage of the high demand and very low supply, or AMD has secretly raised the MSRP for the Ryzen 9 3900X. Historically, AMD hasn't always publicly announced pricing updates for its products. When it does, it's usually a price cut.

We've reached out to AMD for comment and will update the article when the chipmaker gets back to us.

  • hftvhftv
    This was expected, but unfortunate
    Reply
  • bigdragon
    I hope the MSRP has not increased. I've been waiting for the 3900X to come back in stock and will not support scalpers. A higher MSRP makes upgrading less appealing.
    Reply
  • cryoburner
    bigdragon said:
    I hope the MSRP has not increased. I've been waiting for the 3900X to come back in stock and will not support scalpers. A higher MSRP makes upgrading less appealing.
    I kind of doubt the MSRP has been raised. If that were the case, you would likely see more consistency in the pricing. The stores are probably just increasing prices to whatever they think people will be willing to pay. It's a lot like what we saw when there was a shortage of graphics cards last year due to crypto mining. The MSRPs didn't increase, but since the retailers were selling out of the cards as soon as they got more in stock, they raised prices to make the best of it. If no one else reliably has the product in stock at MSRP, and there are people willing to pay the higher prices, it kind of makes sense from a business perspective.

    And paying a premium can still be considered worthwhile to many of the customers buying a processor like this. It may be on a "mainstream" platform, but the 3900X is clearly geared toward a more niche professional audience rather than mainstream users. For those whose profession can truly benefit from having a 12-core, 24-thread processor, paying a 15% premium on the chip can still be considered very reasonable when the closest competition from Intel costs twice as much. And if the higher price deters many of those who don't really have an actual "need" for such a processor, that could actually be considered a good thing for those that do, since it may be a bit easier for them to get hold of one. Someone buying a CPU for gaming, or general "enthusiast" PC use, might be better served by some other processor anyway, and if they really want one, they can probably wait until stock is more widely available some months down the line.

    By the way, its worth pointing out that the 9900K was also unavailable at its MSRP for many months following its launch. Despite having a $488 MSRP, Newegg had it priced a very similar $580 for its first couple months on the market, and Best Buy only occasionally had it in stock for $530, based on PCPartPicker's price history graph. They don't list Amazon pricing, but I believe it was similar to Newegg's when in stock. Then, after a couple months, you started to see wider availability at more outlets, though it was still priced around $540-550, before settling around $530, where it stayed until about 6 months after launch, when it finally started dropping near its MSRP, under $500.

    ...the Ryzen 9 3900X has gone up in price in a little more than three month's time since the chip's release...
    Shouldn't that be "less" than three months? Third-gen Ryzen only came out in July.
    Reply
  • AlistairAB
    MemoryExpress has 100 of them in Canada. I think it is just a temporary blip for a week.
    Reply
  • redgarl
    AlistairAB said:
    MemoryExpress has 100 of them in Canada. I think it is just a temporary blip for a week.
    And the price is near MSRP to.
    Reply
  • redgarl
    Update 9/28/2019 6:00am PT: AMD responded and confirmed that it hasn't raised the official pricing for the Ryzen 9 3900X, meaning that these price hikes are solely at the discretion of retailers.

    I like when you are spinning things, Making the allusion, stirring up people and been regressing after the fact when having the official word.
    Reply
  • mdd1963
    A limited supply of 3900X CPUs pretty much guarantees raised prices, and if/when instantaneous quick sell-outs continue, more raised prices....until lack of demand at said price reduces prices...

    Classic demand vs. market pricing action in play....
    Reply
  • gxk
    Was able to get my 3900x for $560 with free overnight shipping.

    I'd take that over waiting and waiting forever. But seems I got it at a bargain
    Reply
  • alextheblue
    Could you imagine how bad supply would be if they didn't go with chiplets this generation?
    Reply
  • chickenballs
    are people mining crypto currency with CPUs now? :D
    First it was SSD shortage, then RAM shortage then GPU shortage then intel cpu shortage now AMD Ryzen shortage

    and I thought shortages only happen in communist countries like the USSR and North Korea
    Reply