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AMD Ryzen Threadripper 2990WX Listed At Retailer With $1835 Price Tag

Canadian retailer Canada Computers & Electronics accidentally listed AMD's flagship Ryzen Threadripper 2990WX processor on its website for a brief moment. The 32-core monster appeared with an eye-watering price tag of $2,399 CAD, which is roughly equivalent to $1,835 USD.

The outlet listed the Threadripper 2990WX, which had been rumored to come with the "X" suffix, with part number YD299XAZAFWOF. The 2990WX is AMD's upcoming HEDT (High End Desktop) processor oriented to power users and professionals.

Needless to say, the processor has been surrounded by a fair share of rumors and leaks about its specifications. This this is what we know so far: The Threadripper 2990WX utilizes AMD's 12-nanometer Zen+ architecture and doubles the core and thread count of the previous flagship Threadripper 1950X processor, meaning it has a total of 32 cores and 64 threads at its disposal. Depending on who you believe, the processor operates at a 3 GHz base clock with a 3.4 GHz all-core boost clock. Thanks to the latest information from Canada Computers & Electronics, it's safe to say that the Threadripper 2990WX comes with at least 80MB of cache (16MB of L2 + 64MB of L3 cache). 

Major motherboard manufacturers like ASRock, Gigabyte, and MSI recently began to release new BIOSes for their X399 motherboards to accommodate AMD's upcoming Ryzen Threadripper 2000-series processors. Although the Threadripper 2990WX features a 250W TDP (thermal design power), the processor should work fine on at stock settings on existing X399 motherboards. Overclocking capabilities will likely depend on the motherboard's power delivery subsystem, which differs from one motherboard to the next. Gigabyte and MSI have already prepared their respective X399 Aorus Xtreme and MEG X399 Creation motherboards for the task.

The Threadripper 1950X debuted last year with a price tag of $999, and because the Threadripper 2990WX is basically two Threadripper 1950X's on a single multi-chip module, the Canadian retailer's $1,835 asking price is quite credible.

  • Martell1977
    The 250w shouldn't be a big deal for that platform and I'm glad it will go to good use, unlike the 220w FX 9xxx CPU's which were just retarded.
    Reply
  • Tanyac
    I am really waiting to jump ship from Intel to AMD.. Lack of a SGX equivalent and a couple of other issues, including lack of motherboard features that I need that were only available on Intel stopped me when the Threadripper was released.

    But this time it looks like price will be the killer. I don't think a lot of people need 32 cores (me included), although after the Spectre and Meltdown issues I did notice a fair reduction in performance of my 7900X. (About 20% longer encode time for some media).

    $2399 CAD is about $2500 AUD but by the time the AU resellers add on their "price gouging" percentage, it'll probably sell for $2899. That's two months rent for me.

    Although, Intel's 7960X currently sells for up to $2499 depending on retailer, so I hope they don't double that price given the double # of cores :(
    Reply
  • mikewinddale
    But can it run Crysis?
    Reply
  • Kaz_2_
    i know its pricey but its indeed so cheap ...... do you able to get 32 cores from Intel? probably not. if the price lower to 1500 it will cost 46.875 dollars per core. it will be a good workstation against apple mac book with 18 intel cores. When compare performace at the same clock frequency, AMD zen architecture win. This mean AMD is still young and have more room for improvement. It will be easy to get from 4ghz to 5 but not from 5ghz to 6ghz for Intel. this is reality and we have to know the peak limit of everything. everyone should remember when Intel cpu come out their clock were so low and now they getting near 5 ghz at single core. What make us think AMD not able to reach 5ghz? is it because they have budget research and development or because no one believe in this company? I cant wait AMD releasing the 2800x!
    Reply
  • paul prochnow
    Do I need my own power generation station?
    -OR- Will a step up back yard transformer be ok?
    Reply
  • paul prochnow
    They do all this but forget to Clock up the Ryzen 7s to 5.5GHz "au natural" turbo style with a 4.4Ghz base clock.
    Reply
  • redgarl
    That CPU is not aimed at gaming... I hope people realize this... however, if it was Intel marketing it, they would put a gamer playing CS in the background slide.

    I hope the benchmarks for the review of this CPU will be on par with its intended use.

    That means, Toms, no GTA V benchmarks... for god sake...
    Reply
  • redgarl
    21187173 said:
    I am really waiting to jump ship from Intel to AMD.. Lack of a SGX equivalent and a couple of other issues, including lack of motherboard features that I need that were only available on Intel stopped me when the Threadripper was released.

    But this time it looks like price will be the killer. I don't think a lot of people need 32 cores (me included), although after the Spectre and Meltdown issues I did notice a fair reduction in performance of my 7900X. (About 20% longer encode time for some media).

    $2399 CAD is about $2500 AUD but by the time the AU resellers add on their "price gouging" percentage, it'll probably sell for $2899. That's two months rent for me.

    Although, Intel's 7960X currently sells for up to $2499 depending on retailer, so I hope they don't double that price given the double # of cores :(

    This CPU is special, it is not for anyone, it is for heavy computing and rendering. The only way to get 32 cores before now, was to own a server. You need to understand, this is server material. It is not for watching Netflix or doing some twitch while gaming.

    It is a huge investment. Unless you really need it, I would pass if you have a skylake X. However, now TR first gen are selling for nothing in comparison of their MSRP.
    Reply
  • redgarl
    21188429 said:
    Do I need my own power generation station?
    -OR- Will a step up back yard transformer be ok?

    Cannot be worst than the 9900k... the solder obligated CPU.
    Reply
  • redgarl
    21188433 said:
    They do all this but forget to Clock up the Ryzen 7s to 5.5GHz "au natural" turbo style with a 4.4Ghz base clock.

    After 4 years of 14nm from Intel, they finally pass the 5GHz treshold... however it only takes a fridge to do so on 28 cores.
    Reply