Skip to main content

Next-Gen AMD 32-Core Ryzen Threadripper Spotted Ticking up to 4.3 GHz

A new Geekbench 4 result has surfaced to help shed more light on AMD's 32-core Ryzen Threadripper (codename Castle Peak) processor's specifications. This marks the third leak that we've seen so far for the mysterious AMD 100-000000011-11 sample, but this time the chip's clock speeds register at up to an impressive 4.3 GHz.

(Image credit: AMD)

Like the previous Ryzen Threadripper 2990WX, the flagship Threadripper 3000-series part is very likely to maintain the 32-core, 64-thread configuration. The Geekbench 4 software has identified the processor with a 2MB L1 cache, 16MB L2 cache, and 128MB L3 cache. As per Geekbench 4's data, the upcoming 32-core chip allegedly has 1MB less L1 cache but double the L3 cache as opposed the Threadripper 2990WX. Unfortunately, the operating clocks for the AMD 100-000000011-11 sample are all over the place as they don't seem to match in any of the Geekbench 4 results.

Price (USD)Cores / ThreadsTDPBase ClockBoost ClockL1 CacheL2 CacheL3 CachePCIe LanesMemory Support
*AMD 100-000000011-11?32 / 64?3.6 GHz4.3 GHz2MB16MB128MB??
AMD Threadripper 2990WX$179932 / 64250W3.0 GHz4.2 GHz3MB16MB64MBPCIe 3.0 x64Quad DDR4-2933

*Specifications in the table are unconfirmed

The minimum and maximum reported clock speeds out of all three Geekbench 4 results are 3.7 GHz and 4.3 GHz, respectively. Assuming for a second that 3.7 GHz is the base clock, then Intel would definitely have its hands full. Nevertheless, there's a strong possibility that the Geekbench 4 benchmarks are PBO (Precision Boost Overdrive) overclocked runs, so it's too soon to pass judgment.

CPU-Z, a widely used system information utility, recently added preliminary support for AMD's Ryzen Threadripper 3000-series processors. That is a clear sign that new Ryzen Threadripper chips might be closer than we think.

AMD Ryzen Threadripper 3000 preliminary supportIntel Ice-Lake preliminary supportNVIDIA RTX 2070 and 2080 Super

It's been a phenomenal year for AMD this far. The chipmaker has shaken up the computer hardware market with its innovative 7nm offerings, such as the Ryzen 3000-series desktop processors, Navi-powered graphics cards and, more recently, the EPYC 7002-series enterprise processors. Rolling out the Ryzen Threadripper 3000-series would definitely be the icing on the cake for AMD, and we can't think of a better way for the chipmaker to finish 2019 with a bang.

  • GetSmart
    Yupsies, more troubles for Intel's HEDT line. Intel should retire or move their HEDT into mainstream desktop, and rebadge their Xeon workstation line (with 6 channel memory) as the new HEDT.
    Reply
  • kinggremlin
    GetSmart said:
    Yupsies, more troubles for Intel's HEDT line. Intel should retire or move their HEDT into mainstream desktop, and rebadge their Xeon workstation line (with 6 channel memory) as the new HEDT.

    Intel's HEDT has more of a market than Threadripper because of the severe and annoying stratification Intel does with its product stacks that AMD doesn't. With the impending release of a 16 core Ryzen CPU with PCIE4 support, what exactly is the point of threadripper? How many workstations need more than 16 cores? The market demand for 32 core workstations has to be miniscule. If you need that many cores you're going the server route with Epyc.
    Reply
  • Johan Steyn
    kinggremlin said:
    Intel's HEDT has more of a market than Threadripper because of the severe and annoying stratification Intel does with its product stacks that AMD doesn't. With the impending release of a 16 core Ryzen CPU with PCIE4 support, what exactly is the point of threadripper? How many workstations need more than 16 cores? The market demand for 32 core workstations has to be miniscule. If you need that many cores you're going the server route with Epyc.


    Threadripper is not just about cores. Do you even follow this product? Let me then repeat the obvious. TR has many more PCI lanes as well as quad channel memory support. As far as I know, it supports ECC as well. And if you think 32 cores are redundant, you are also mistaken. TR is cheaper than Epyc as well and usually run at higher frequencies since it is not as mission critical servers.
    Reply
  • jimmysmitty
    GetSmart said:
    Yupsies, more troubles for Intel's HEDT line. Intel should retire or move their HEDT into mainstream desktop, and rebadge their Xeon workstation line (with 6 channel memory) as the new HEDT.

    There is more to it than just "more cores". Professionals typically use GPGPU more than higher core counts anyways. AMD has work to do to sway people. Mainly they need to up their marketing game and start working with professional software developers to optimize and ensure stability with their products. Thats something Intel, and on the GPU end nVidia, does heavily.
    Reply
  • kinggremlin
    Johan Steyn said:
    Threadripper is not just about cores. Do you even follow this product? Let me then repeat the obvious. TR has many more PCI lanes as well as quad channel memory support. As far as I know, it supports ECC as well. And if you think 32 cores are redundant, you are also mistaken. TR is cheaper than Epyc as well and usually run at higher frequencies since it is not as mission critical servers.

    No, I do not follow Threadripper. I was unaware it had its own Twitter account. Ryzen supports ECC. Not every motherboard supports it, but if you need the feature, you just need to find one that does. Between the chipset and the CPU, 570 motherboards support up to 40 PCIE 4.0 channels. That is sufficient for the overwhelming majority of workstations. As for quad channel vs dual channel. Peruse the many articles covering this topic. They all come to the same conclusion, it doesn't matter. Feel free to link to one that doesn't come to that conclusion. Again, I'm sure quad channel will pay some big dividends in the server market, but it just doesn't matter for workstations.

    Being able to read down a feature list doesn't make you an expert on a product, nor does it put you in a position to insult the knowledge level of other posters. The Threadripper product stack just doesn't make much sense in the current market, and if Intel didn't artificially handicap their mainstream platforms so much, their HEDT stack would be equally pointless.
    Reply