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ASRock Announces Two Xeon E3-1200 V5 Compatible Motherboards

Intel’s Xeon E3-1200 V5 series processors aren’t compatible with Intel’s consumer chipsets. Instead, the latest Xeon processors pair with Intel’s C232 chipset, which was specifically engineered for the new Xeons. ASRock believes there’s a market for these processors in the gaming and workstation categories and has announced that it will be launching a board for each segment.

The ASRock Fatal1ty E3V5 Performance Gaming/OC motherboard is equipped with the typical features found on the company’s other gaming motherboards with the exception of on-board graphics, which the Xeon processors don’t support at all.

The Fatal1ty E3V5 Performance Gaming/OC board comes equipped with the same exclusive features included with all Fatal1ty boards: Key Master, which lets you create custom macros; F-Stream, a software suite that includes overclocking tools and other tweaks; and the Fatal1ty Mouse Port, which lets you adjust the mouse polling rate from 125Hz to 1000Hz using F-Stream. The Fatal1ty E3V5 Performance Gaming/OC board also features Gaming Armor, Super Alloy, ASRock Hyper BCLK Engine and DDR4 Non-Z OC. The board supports both standard and ECC memory.

ASRock also announced the E3V5 WS, a workstation board that also supports standard and ECC DDR4 memory modules. ASRock has engineered the board to be compatible with Nvidia Quadro and AMD FirePro graphics cards. ASRock has also equipped the E3V5 WS with Intel’s I219LM LAN chipset for server-grade network connectivity and OS support.

ASRock has not yet revealed pricing and availability of these new C232 chipset motherboards but it did say the WS board would follow the Fatal1ty release and that both would launch after Christmas, so it shouldn’t be long before we have those details.

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  • firefoxx04
    Awesome. I was considering an Xeon v3 for my socket 1150 system but I found a super good deal on the 4790k.
    Reply
  • BulkZerker
    Scratching my head on the "gamer" board. Are these server parts coming with unlocked multipliers or is asrock just that confident in the parts ability to over clock?
    Reply
  • RedJaron
    There certainly is a market for these on the gaming and "non-pro" side of the market. If pricing is right, my next build will be an E3v5.

    Zerk, no, the Xeon's won't be multiplier unlocked, but they share Skylake's more OC friendly BCLK. This, IMNSHO, is why Intel made the v5 incompatible with Z170 and H170. The 1231v3 already ate into the i7 sales on LGA1150. If you can take a v5 to 4 GHz and beyond on BCLK adjustment alone, why would anyone buy the more expensive 6700K? So, if these server boards allow BCLK adjustment, it's a smart move to grab these instead of a more expensive i7. Again, if the mboard and CPU prices are right.
    Reply
  • John Wittenberg
    If they are anything like the E5-16XX V1, V2, or V3 then they will be multiplier unlocked.

    The multiprocessor versions, 2XXX 4XXX and 8XXX, variations are multiplier locked, but the 1P Xeons aren't.

    I've got an E5 1650V2, which is essentially a high quality 4930K, sailing along at 4.5GHz and it runs COOL - 68C max under Prime95 and with a big, quiet air cooler.
    Reply
  • nikoli707
    price please. the 1230v5 is basically a dream chip at $275. if the motherboard costs around $125 on a decent deal then the 1230v5 is your new king of the hill no doubt. add $35 for a decent cooler like the cryorig h7 and you are sitting at about $435 total. thats only a few bucks more than a 6700k alone.

    can anyone find the turbo binning for the 1230v5? it just gives a generic 34x base with a 38x turbo. there is no break down for how much turbo multi for single, dual, and quad core. i would assume 38x for single, maybe 37x or 36x for dual, and 35x or 34x for quad. but its entirely possible that like other skylake processors it will turbo all four cores up as high as 36x. anyways 34x120bclk=4.08ghz and 38x120bclk=4.56ghz. sure would be nice if it can do all four cores at 36x120bclk=4.32ghz. that would be a lot of bang for your buck.
    Reply
  • blazorthon
    If they are anything like the E5-16XX V1, V2, or V3 then they will be multiplier unlocked.

    The multiprocessor versions, 2XXX 4XXX and 8XXX, variations are multiplier locked, but the 1P Xeons aren't.

    I've got an E5 1650V2, which is essentially a high quality 4930K, sailing along at 4.5GHz and it runs COOL - 68C max under Prime95 and with a big, quiet air cooler.

    These are E3s, not E5s. I am not aware of any multiplier unlocked models for the Xeon E3 SKUs.
    Reply
  • blazorthon
    17211206 said:
    There certainly is a market for these on the gaming and "non-pro" side of the market. If pricing is right, my next build will be an E3v5.

    Zerk, no, the Xeon's won't be multiplier unlocked, but they share Skylake's more OC friendly BCLK. This, IMNSHO, is why Intel made the v5 incompatible with Z170 and H170. The 1231v3 already ate into the i7 sales on LGA1150. If you can take a v5 to 4 GHz and beyond on BCLK adjustment alone, why would anyone buy the more expensive 6700K? So, if these server boards allow BCLK adjustment, it's a smart move to grab these instead of a more expensive i7. Again, if the mboard and CPU prices are right.

    I'm stuck on why anyone would buy a 6700K when you can go for a 5820K for a similar price for the CPU plus motherboard. Skylake is still way too expensive when six core cut-down Extreme Editions are price-competitive.

    If the Xeon V5 platform prices out well and BCLK overclocking isn't somehow gimped, then consumer Skylake will probably not do too well moving forward for the enthusiast buyers.
    Reply
  • RedJaron
    17212663 said:
    I'm stuck on why anyone would buy a 6700K when you can go for a 5820K for a similar price for the CPU plus motherboard. Skylake is still way too expensive when six core cut-down Extreme Editions are price-competitive.

    If the Xeon V5 platform prices out well and BCLK overclocking isn't somehow gimped, then consumer Skylake will probably not do too well moving forward for the enthusiast buyers.
    It's similar to why anyone would buy a 4790K over a 1231v3. Some people just want bragging rights and chase maximum clockrates, regardless if it actually does anything for them. And most people want to get to a new platform for the better chipset. In the case of the i7 vs E3v3, at least getting a 4790K means you can get eight threads going at 4.0+ GHz where the Xeon can't hope to get that high. If you can saturate those threads, the speed increase is very meaningful.
    Reply
  • Amdlova
    My Work computer right now is the xeon 1270v1 sandy bridge-ws cheap 100us with the gigabyte b75-dh3 make a good combo. low power good speed. Right now i can say. this xeon is better than a 3770k. I can rar a large file. browser, lots of torrent 48 same time (my old x2 265 with oc works only 18 at time) and play a game... i think that xeon v5 with ddr5 ECC will make a overkill combo. I want that! bring the power tests to the table!
    Reply
  • RedJaron
    17213138 said:
    Right now i can say. this xeon is better than a 3770k.
    In what sense? That it cost less? The 3770K at stock clocks is 100 MHz faster at both base and turbo multipliers and has added efficiency from being IB whereas that Xeon is SB. Add in overclocking and the i7 would embarrass the Xeon. If money isn't an issue and you're just worried about pure performance, an unlocked i7 will outdo any Xeon E3. If you want eight threads for cheap, then the Xeon is the better value.
    Reply