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Corsair MP600 Pro XT PCIe 4.0 SSD Expands to 8TB Capacity

Corsair
Corsair (Image credit: Corsair)

Corsair has quietly added an 8TB SSD model to its MP600 Pro XT family of premium PCIe 4.0 drives and started their sales in Europe, perhaps months before the company begins sales of its next-generation MP700 SSDs with a PCIe 5.0 interface. The new drives offer a massive capacity, but their performance is slightly lower when compared to other SSDs from this family.

Corsair's MP600 Pro XT M.2-2280 drives are the company's flagship storage products based on Phison's PS5018-E18 controller and Micron's 176-layer 3D TLC NAND memory. So far, Corsair has offered its MP600 Pro XT drives in 1TB, 2TB, and 4TB configurations, but this week German retailer Proshop.de (opens in new tab) began to offer 8TB versions of these devices, reports ComputerBase.de (opens in new tab).

Corsair's new 8TB MP600 Pro XT SSDs are rated for an up to 7,100 MB/s sequential read speed, an up to 6,100 MB/sequential write speed as well as 1.2 million/950 thousand random read/write IOPS (see detailed specifications in comparison to other drives in the lineup below). While the highest-capacity SSDs are typically slightly slower compared to mid-range capacity configurations, Corsair's MP600 Pro XT 8TB will still be one of the best SSDs available with a PCIe 4.0 x4 interface.

Product1TB2TB4TB8TB
Non-HS Pricing$199.99$399.99$989.99?
HS PricingN/A$424.99$999.99?
Capacity (User / Raw)1000GB / 1024GB2000GB / 2048GB4000GB / 4096GB8000GB / 8096GB
Form FactorM.2 2280M.2 2280M.2 2280M.2 2280
Interface / ProtocolPCIe 4.0 x4 / NVMe 1.4PCIe 4.0 x4 / NVMe 1.4PCIe 4.0 x4 / NVMe 1.4PCIe 4.0 x4 / NVMe 1.4
ControllerPhison PS5018-E18Phison PS5018-E18Phison PS5018-E18Phison PS5018-E18
DRAMDDR4DDR4DDR4DDR4
MemoryMicron 176L TLCMicron 176L TLCMicron 176L TLCMicron 176L TLC
Sequential Read7,100 MBps7,100 MBps7,100 MBps7,100 MBps
Sequential Write5,800 MBps6,800 MBps6,800 MBps6,100 MBps
Random Read900,000 IOPS1,000,000 IOPS1,000,000 IOPS950,000 IOPS
Random Write1,200,000 IOPS1,200,000 IOPS1,200,000 IOPS1,200,000 IOPS
SecurityAES 256-bit encryption AES 256-bit encryption AES 256-bit encryption AES 256-bit encryption 
Endurance (TBW)700 TB1,400 TB3,000 TB6,000 TB
Part NumberCSSD-F1000GBMP600PXTCSSD-F2000GBMP600PXTCSSD-F4000GBMP600PXTCSSD-F8000GBMP600PXT
Warranty5-Years5-Years5-Years5-Years

Corsair's MP600 Pro XT 8TB SSDs are not cheap. The retailer sells these 8TB drives for €1,399.90 ($1,158 without VAT), which is slightly more expensive than the price of two MP600 Pro XT 4TB devices. Meanwhile, recommended price of Corsair's 8TB drive in the U.S. is unclear as it is not available on this side of the pond.

For enthusiasts who already have a machine with a PCIe 5.0 x4-supporting M.2 slot or those who wait for AMD's Ryzen 7000-series or Intel's 13th Gen Core 'Raptor Lake' platforms with PCIe Gen5 support, the dilemma is whether to buy a high-capacity PCIe Gen4 SSD now or wait for upcoming drives with a PCIe 5.0 interface. Unfortunately, there is no correct answer for this question as we do not know when exactly Corsair and other vendors release their PCIe Gen5 drives, especially those not constrained with a 10GBps read speed.

Anton Shilov
Freelance News Writer

Anton Shilov is a Freelance News Writer at Tom’s Hardware US. Over the past couple of decades, he has covered everything from CPUs and GPUs to supercomputers and from modern process technologies and latest fab tools to high-tech industry trends.

  • Alvar "Miles" Udell
    This is the problem with SSDs today. It's not speed or endurance, it's the fact that 4TB and 8TB drives have such a gigantic price premium...
    Reply
  • USAFRet
    Alvar Miles Udell said:
    This is the problem with SSDs today. It's not speed or endurance, it's the fact that 4TB and 8TB drives have such a gigantic price premium...
    The majority of people I know would be hard pressed to fill up a 2TB.

    "SSDs today" is exactly the same as it was with "HDDs then..."


    What was the very first hard drive you bought, not included in a prebuilt PC?

    Mine was a 125MB, for about $140.
    Reply
  • kanewolf
    USAFRet said:
    The majority of people I know would be hard pressed to fill up a 2TB.

    "SSDs today" is exactly the same as it was with "HDDs then..."


    What was the very first hard drive you bought, not included in a prebuilt PC?

    Mine was a 125MB, for about $140.
    ST-225 -- 20MB for $200 including controller card.
    Reply
  • USAFRet
    kanewolf said:
    ST-225 -- 20MB for $200 including controller card.
    The first one I used was a 10MB, in the XT compatible my dad gave me.
    And then...Stacker to make it 20MB. But even more distubingly slow...lol
    Reply
  • Makaveli
    USAFRet said:
    The majority of people I know would be hard pressed to fill up a 2TB.

    "SSDs today" is exactly the same as it was with "HDDs then..."


    What was the very first hard drive you bought, not included in a prebuilt PC?

    Mine was a 125MB, for about $140.

    it doesn't sound like that majority are actually IT people.

    80% of the people I know that have IT careers will have no problem filling that drive :)
    Reply
  • USAFRet
    Makaveli said:
    it doesn't sound like that majority are actually IT people.

    80% of the people I know that have IT careers will have no problem filling that drive :)
    And the people in IT careers are a small percentage of the population....:)
    All the geeks at work could easily make use if that.

    I'm just saying...a 4TB NVMe drive is applicable to a very small percentage of people. Currently.
    This will change, along with prices.

    Just a few short years ago, a 1TB SATA III SSD was $200.
    Reply
  • Makaveli
    USAFRet said:
    And the people in IT careers are a small percentage of the population....:)
    All the geeks at work could easily make use if that.

    I'm just saying...a 4TB NVMe drive is applicable to a very small percentage of people. Currently.
    This will change, along with prices.

    Just a few short years ago, a 1TB SATA III SSD was $200.

    True.

    i'm at the point now with all the Sony Ported games coming out to PC that my 1TBx2 Raid 0 Sata setup is only at 500GB free space now which won't last long with a few more games. So i'm going to have to add more SSD's to my rig just for game storage. I won't add a 2nd m2 drive until Direct X storage is out and they have released firmware optimized drives.
    Reply
  • USAFRet
    Makaveli said:
    True.

    i'm at the point now with all the Sony Ported games coming out to PC that my 1TBx2 Raid 0 Sata setup is only at 500GB free space now which won't last long with a few more games. So i'm going to have to add more SSD's to my rig just for game storage. I won't add a 2nd m2 drive until Direct X storage is out and they have released firmware optimized drives.
    My current main system has 6x 1TB SSD.
    No RAID 0 involved or wanted.

    Windows and applications have gotten so much better over the last few years, that combining 2 or more drives into a RAID 0 simply for the 'size' doesn't make a lot of sense.

    And, apart from benchmark numbers and tiny edge cases, the theoretical speed benefit of a RAID 0 is totally lost on SSD.
    Reply
  • Makaveli
    USAFRet said:
    My current main system has 6x 1TB SSD.
    No RAID 0 involved or wanted.

    Windows and applications have gotten so much better over the last few years, that combining 2 or more drives into a RAID 0 simply for the 'size' doesn't make a lot of sense.

    And, apart from benchmark numbers and tiny edge cases, the theoretical speed benefit of a RAID 0 is totally lost on SSD.

    The reason i went RAID 0 on that is I wanted a single storage pool for the games. And since its only games on there not concerned with a RAID failure and no issues since the raid was created in dec 2019.

    The sequential access increase is nice but not really noticed in my usage of it. Other than the time I copy large files to that storage.

    Windows and all my apps are on the PCIe 4 SSD in the system. When I did this build I decided no HDD were ever going to be in it so I have a NAS on the network with those for mass storage.
    Reply
  • tamalero
    USAFRet said:
    The majority of people I know would be hard pressed to fill up a 2TB.

    "SSDs today" is exactly the same as it was with "HDDs then..."


    What was the very first hard drive you bought, not included in a prebuilt PC?

    Mine was a 125MB, for about $140.
    You answered yourself, people who bu these aren't "majority of people" It would be heavy users, powerful users, gamers.
    Not to mention that games continue to expand in data weight by a lot every year.
    Reply