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Crytek’s ‘The Climb’ Getting Free Touch Update In December

Oculus is one month away from shipping its Touch controllers to the first customers. As part of Oculus’s marketing campaign, the company started Touch Tuesdays, in which it showcases one Touch title per week leading up to the release of the controllers. The first Touch Tuesday focused on Dead and Buried, a first-person shooter that comes free with every Touch pre-order. The second Touch Tuesday is all about Crytek's The Climb.

If you already own an Oculus Rift, you’re probably familiar with The Climb, a virtual reality rock climbing game, and you may have even tried it. Crytek launched the game as an Oculus exclusive title in April, shortly after the launch of the Rift HMD.  

In the current version of The Climb, you use the triggers on an Xbox One controller to climb you way up the mountainside. The left trigger represents your left hand, and the right trigger is your right hand. When you play the game with a controller, you get the feeling of vertigo that heights can cause, but the controller prevents you from truly losing yourself in the game. When Oculus releases Touch in December, Crytek is shipping an update to add support for Oculus’s motion controllers.

Oculus spoke with Crytek’s Niels Stoelinga, Gameplay Programmer for The Climb, about the implementation of Touch controls to the game. Stoelinga said that the motion controls add to the realism of the climbing mechanics. With Touch controllers, you don’t have to rely on buttons for certain mechanics, such as reaching out to grab your next perch.

“Some mechanics became simpler with Touch,” said Stoelinga to Oculus. “For example, in the gamepad version, we used a button press for players to check their watch in-game. Now you can just look at your wrist. This actually becomes a lot more immersive and natural because it replicates real life.”

Not all mechanics are simpler for Touch. The developers had to compensate for hand movement. “Playing with a gamepad, the movement of the player is automatic. With Touch, the player decides how to move through the space,” said Stoelinga. The developers also had to consider player fatigue while fine-tuning the game mechanics.

Two Side-By-Side Versions

Part of The Climb’s charm is the game’s online leaderboard, which allows climbers to compete for the highest score on a given course. Crytek decided to create separate leader boards for gamepad players and Touch players because the game mechanics are so dramatically different. The gamepad version is mostly about timing. Every player has the same reach, and you can always jump the same height. A Touch player’s reach is at the mercy of their arm length, and their ability to jump will vary depending on their height, the strength of their legs, and the ceiling height in their VR room.

Oculus Touch launches on December 6, 2016, and Crytek is ready for the hardware release. Touch support is a free update for The Climb. If you already own the game, you won’t have to purchase anything. If you don’t own the game yet, it’s available in the Oculus Store for $49.99

  • wifiburger
    lol, go for payed updates, even control updates, good way to piss the early adopters, it's not like they would loose anything, VR market is low and will no way take off if history has tought the anything is that VR / 3d bullshit doesn't work whatsoever !
    Reply
  • mattcrow
    I agree 100%. Just like 3D TVs were a flop, so will be VR.
    Reply
  • kcarbotte
    18845122 said:
    I agree 100%. Just like 3D TVs were a flop, so will be VR.

    3D TVs offered nothing compelling. It was just a slight upgrade to a decades old technology that everyone already had. There was no reason to get a 3D TV unless you happened to need a new TV.

    VR and AR offer experiences that are not possible any other way and the experiences are incredibly compelling.
    3D TVs also only had a few companies backing the tech.
    VR is being backed by every major company in the tech industry. There has already been billions invested into the medium (I'd bet there's more invested into VR and AR already than the total investment into 3D TVs)

    By all means, keep living in your bubble, but you're going to be eating your words in a couple of years. I'd bet my bottom dollar on it.
    Reply
  • mattcrow
    18845479 said:
    18845122 said:
    I agree 100%. Just like 3D TVs were a flop, so will be VR.

    3D TVs offered nothing compelling. It was just a slight upgrade to a decades old technology that everyone already had. There was no reason to get a 3D TV unless you happened to need a new TV.

    VR and AR offer experiences that are not possible any other way and the experiences are incredibly compelling.
    3D TVs also only had a few companies backing the tech.
    VR is being backed by every major company in the tech industry. There has already been billions invested into the medium (I'd bet there's more invested into VR and AR already than the total investment into 3D TVs)

    By all means, keep living in your bubble, but you're going to be eating your words in a couple of years. I'd bet my bottom dollar on it.

    I would really like to believe what you're saying is true.
    I know that a lot of money is being invested into the platform, but personally I seriously fail to see VR becoming as common as say smartphones. Average consumer is never going to buy it.
    I have no doubt that it will take off for industrial purposes, I can see companies using it for visualising things, military, medical industry, even museums. I would love to see places like your good old "lazer" being open, with big open spaces where you could come in with your friends and play some crazy VR games.
    I have no problem seeing this.

    But VR becoming popular at homes? Nope...
    Reply
  • fil333
    You have to have tried VR to make a statement like that. HTC Vive, Oculus Rift and PS VR offer a much more compelling experience than past prototypes. You also need titles made specifically for VR to take advantage of it.
    Reply
  • kcarbotte
    18845905 said:
    18845479 said:
    18845122 said:
    I agree 100%. Just like 3D TVs were a flop, so will be VR.

    3D TVs offered nothing compelling. It was just a slight upgrade to a decades old technology that everyone already had. There was no reason to get a 3D TV unless you happened to need a new TV.

    VR and AR offer experiences that are not possible any other way and the experiences are incredibly compelling.
    3D TVs also only had a few companies backing the tech.
    VR is being backed by every major company in the tech industry. There has already been billions invested into the medium (I'd bet there's more invested into VR and AR already than the total investment into 3D TVs)

    By all means, keep living in your bubble, but you're going to be eating your words in a couple of years. I'd bet my bottom dollar on it.

    I would really like to believe what you're saying is true.
    I know that a lot of money is being invested into the platform, but personally I seriously fail to see VR becoming as common as say smartphones. Average consumer is never going to buy it.
    I have no doubt that it will take off for industrial purposes, I can see companies using it for visualising things, military, medical industry, even museums. I would love to see places like your good old "lazer" being open, with big open spaces where you could come in with your friends and play some crazy VR games.
    I have no problem seeing this.

    But VR becoming popular at homes? Nope...

    I don't understand why you come to that conclusion.
    VR is like a teleportation device. It allows you to "be" anywhere you can imagine.

    VR and AR will be used in education, business, enterprise, medical and entertainment markets. You will be exposed to these technologies one way or another. Most people will be exposed at work or school first, but it's just a matter of time before everyone wants/gets VR hardware at home.
    People made the same arguments about laptops 25 years ago. Look where that lead us.
    Technology adoption happens exponentially quicker these days. It only took a handful of years before there were a billion smartphones out there. VR will be a similar path or quicker.


    Reply
  • b12
    You have not tried vr if you think it will flop lol. Its by far better than what any new console can do these days. The games they have are amazing. Feel like i just got my first nintendo again. Vr will easily take over and not flop. My company is already pursueing the use of vr for training purposes also.
    Reply