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Enermax Releases the Aeolus Vegas Cooling Pad

Enermax has launched the Aeolus Vegas (CP007), an aluminum cooling pad for laptops that features a wide-area steel mesh that supports notebooks of up to 17 inches and a "performance-capable Vortex frame" that generates "a strong air twirl which offers a more focused cooling to heated notebook parts." 

The Aeolus Vegas incorporates a 180 mm T.B. Vegas Quad cooling fan with 24 blue, green, red and white diodes and an integrated microchip that can generate four different light effects at the touch of a button (or turned off entirely). The fan is magnetically mounted to the pad which allows users to reposition it to better suit the requirements of their laptops.

Last but not least, the aluminum edges of the Vegas feature soft rubber shells to hold the cooler in position, absorb vibrations and provide a location to wind cables around and limit cable tangle.

The Enermax Aeolus Vegas is currently on sale in Europe at the fairly steep price of €44.90 including VAT ($60), and the company has announced that additional notebook coolers will be arriving in the coming months.

  • patrick47018
    Bling Bling
    Reply
  • Honis
    Magnetically attached PC fans. I think they'd on to something...
    Reply
  • danwat1234
    Seeing that you can only plug in up to 100ma in USB devices, I assume the device itself takes at most 400ma or 2watts. How is that supposed to move any significant amount of air? It really should have a wall power option so it can take 5 watts or more so it could cool a gaming laptop significantly.
    Reply
  • Honis
    11427269 said:
    Seeing that you can only plug in up to 100ma in USB devices, I assume the device itself takes at most 400ma or 2watts. How is that supposed to move any significant amount of air? It really should have a wall power option so it can take 5 watts or more so it could cool a gaming laptop significantly.
    USB 2.0 has a max current of 500mA
    USB 3.0 has a max current of 900mA
    Reply
  • razor512
    If you take care of your laptop, when placed on a hard surface, you should not need a cooling fan.

    Laptops are designed and tested for a max rated temperature at full CPU and GPU load (generally 48-72 hours)

    Laptops are generally not tested for dust buildup as that is a loosing battle since air cooler require air to work.


    Many people often forget to clean their laptop heatsinks, or at best look at the outside and think it is clean, not knowing that the dust builds up on the other side.

    and thus, those users end up spending tons of money on cooling pads and other products to fix an issue that is free to fix.

    http://i.imgur.com/l7txQF7.jpg
    Laptop heatsinks clog significantly faster than any heatsink on a desktop computer.

    To cool a laptop using a smaller heatsink, a higher fin density is needed, the tradeoff is when you increase fin density, you make it so that the heatsink will clog faster.

    Laptop heatsinks will begin losing cooling performance within about 2 months of regular use. and in a dusty home or a home without whole house filtration (eg the kind provided by a central cooling system, results like that image can be had within 5 - 6 months of regular use.
    Reply