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G.Skill Beats Itself With 3200 MHz Ripjaws V 128 GB DDR4 Memory Kit

On January 11, G.Skill announced a 128 GB DDR4 memory kit that runs at 3000 MHz with some pretty nifty timings, and although Corsair came close to making a faster kit, it didn’t quite make it. Today, without having been beaten yet, G.Skill announced an even faster Ripjaws V 128 GB kit. This one runs at a rather respectable 3200 MHz.

The kit comes with eight 16 GB modules and is designed for the X99 platform. Naturally, G.Skill included support for an Intel XMP2.0 profile, which makes setting up the modules a snap.

At 1.35 V (the upper limit of the DDR4 specification), the kit can run at timings of CL14-14-14-34 – same as the 3000 MHz kit.

If you’ve decided that you need this kit, you’ll have a month’s time to get $1,069.99 together for when it goes on sale at the end of February.

Follow Niels Broekhuijsen @NBroekhuijsen. Follow us @tomshardware, on Facebook and on Google+.

  • pladimir_vutin
    Futureproof for 3 months
    Rip
    Reply
  • LOLROFL
    Looks affordable.
    Reply
  • dstarr3
    Well. that's a big price tag, but I guess it's actually not a bad price per gig.
    Reply
  • firefoxx04
    I cant wait for people to cry "who needs that much ram!!!!!!"

    I do. Video editing. Virtual Machines. RAM drives. Who cares?
    Reply
  • Jay E
    If you got the need/want for this much memory and you can throw down 1k bucks like it's no one's business. Then yeah.....It's no ones business. Congrats on being able to.
    Reply
  • Gam3r01
    I cant wait for people to cry "who needs that much ram!!!!!!"

    I do. Video editing. Virtual Machines. RAM drives. Who cares?
    If you are doing a build around the X99 platform nobody should be questioning "why" you need anything.
    Reply
  • damric
    Can build a pretty good rig for less than that. 128GB is certainly impressive though.
    Reply
  • hannibal
    Hell yeah!
    100 GB ram drive and 28 GB for actual programs :-) Why not!
    Who need SSD... Well actually SSD is nice, but there is huge possibilities, even if you don't run many virtual machines, or do some serious video editing.
    But yeah, video editing will definitely be more fun, with that much memory!
    Reply
  • atheus
    How much easier it would be to go with an extreme edition design if they would just release them on the current gen mainstream architecture.
    Reply
  • blazorthon
    How much easier it would be to go with an extreme edition design if they would just release them on the current gen mainstream architecture.

    Intel prefers the older one because it's more mature. That makes sense for a number of reasons. The EEs are just rebranded Xeons and the people whom buy EEs are mostly either people who can recoup the large price hike from cheaper CPUs because their income depends on how fast their CPU can crunch numbers and people who just have enough disposable income to throw it around like that. Both types of people are more than a little annoyed when their expensive computer crashes.

    Skylake, as I'm sure you've noticed, has made quite a name for itself in lower stability, especially with heavier workloads. Intel won't be using it in high-performance high-reliability designs until they can iron out some of the major problems. Instead, they sell it to customers who are much less likely to have issues with Skylake as it is.

    Besides, the only time this was a problem was with Guftown versus Sandy Bridge because other than that, none of the new archs were much faster than their predecessors.
    Reply