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Geekbench 5 Shows Mobile Intel Alder Lake CPU Crushing AMD's Ryzen 9 5980HX

12th Generation Alder Lake Processor
(Image credit: Intel)

Thanks to a submission to Geekbench 5, we have our first benchmark scores of the yet-unreleased Intel Core i7-12800H mobile processor. Specs reveal that the chip is equipped with 14 cores and 20 threads, and it was running in a Gigabyte Aorus 15 YE4. According to the Geekbench results, the 12800H is able to comfortably outperform its predecessor, the 11800H.

This is the first time we've seen or heard of the new Core i7-12800H. Intel has yet to announce its release, so we expect the laptop being used to be a prototype from Gigabyte that could be used to test the new chip. 

What we do know is that it is an Alder Lake chip with 6 performance cores and 8 efficiency cores. This is one of the highest core count configurations you'll likely find in Intel's mobile Alder Lake CPUs.

The results reveal this particular i7-12800H was able to hit a single-core score of 1654 points, along with 9618 points in the multi-threaded score. The score is considerably higher than the previous-generation Core i7-11800H that scored 1474 points in the single-core benchmark, and 7959 points in the multi-core benchmark.

This makes the 12800H 12% faster in single-threaded performance and 20% faster in multi-threaded performance than its previous-gen counterpart in Geekbench 5. Without a doubt, the higher core count, along with the overall faster performance of the P cores is making the difference here.

AMD's current best mobile CPU, the Ryzen 9 5980HX, at best has only scored 1467 points in the single-threaded test and 7608 points in the multi-threaded test in an Asus ROG Zephyrus Duo SE. This gives the 12800H a 12% lead in single-threaded performance and 26% in multi-threaded performance over AMD's best mobile processor to date.

Core i7-12800H Geekbench 5

(Image credit: Geekbench)

Keep in mind, these performance results have to be taken with a grain of salt, as Geekbench 5 is not a true indicator of real-world performance. Also, different laptops with different power limits can change performance, despite having the same CPU. So just like other mobile chips, the performance of the 12800H will vary depending on what future laptop it's running in.

However, if performance is anywhere close to the results we've seen today, the Core i7-12800H looks to be a good upgrade from Intel's previous 11th gen products, and well ahead of anything from AMD's current laptop roster.

  • Makaveli
    14c/20t cpu beats 8c/16t previous gen parts.

    In other news water is wet lol.
    Reply
  • anonymousdude
    This is news why? A brand new processor with more cores and threads outperforms the old one.
    Reply
  • hotaru251
    Makaveli said:
    14c/20t cpu beats 8c/16t previous gen parts.
    this.

    With how amd's also acted since 12th gen launched i fully expect Zen4 to crush 12th gen too (especially with how the gap between zen 1 to 2, and 2 to 3 were)
    Reply
  • ddcservices
    hotaru251 said:
    this.

    With how amd's also acted since 12th gen launched i fully expect Zen4 to crush 12th gen too (especially with how the gap between zen 1 to 2, and 2 to 3 were)

    If Zen3 refresh with the 3D stacked cache really does provide that 10-15% performance boost, then that alone will be enough to beat Alder Lake. Zen4 being a fully generation that will probably show up in the first half of 2022 for Ryzen, there is little doubt that AMD will have the better products from top to mid-range(since AMD doesn't have any low end products right now). Zen4 might bring back low-end chips to the AMD lineup, but that isn't known right now.
    Reply
  • spongiemaster
    ddcservices said:
    If Zen3 refresh with the 3D stacked cache really does provide that 10-15% performance boost, then that alone will be enough to beat Alder Lake.
    The additional power requirements for that added cache means we're unlikely to see V-cache in the mobile market.
    Reply
  • Skyye
    Rembrandt APUs: Ryzen 6000 (6 nm) + rDNA2 in Q1 2022 will crush everything
    Reply
  • DonQuixoteIII
    Too many "if's" to support headline. Word 'crush' indicates a slanted viewpoint, lack of journalistic integrity. Fanboi clickbait.
    Reply
  • m3city
    Divide that multithread score by threads and compare with Ryzen. One will get exactly the same result. But single thread score is obviously higher. What is TDP, PL of this processor?
    In real world use there would be no visible difference I guess. Cooling, temp, battery time is soo dependant on laptop vendor but from my (subjective naturally) perspective, Intel does better in these areas.

    I don't like words like "crush" in headlines. That's the reason I shifted to paywalled news sites.
    Reply
  • mitch074
    "crush" is what Zen 1 did to Bulldozer/Godavari (+40% at a lower power envelope). "Crush" is what 2nd-gen Core i did to everybody else when it came out.
    This is a generational improvement : 10-25% more performance with an undisclosed power budget and 20% more threads? It's not "crushing" it's "leapfrogging".
    Like others said, when AMD gets Zen 3D out, they will have similar peak performance at a lower power usage on a technically 2 years old architecture.
    Intel is back in the game, but AMD is still selling everything they make at the price they want without need for a rebate.
    Reply
  • Jim90
    spongiemaster said:
    The additional power requirements for that added cache means we're unlikely to see V-cache in the mobile market.

    Lol, that hasn't stopped Intel releasing grossly inefficient chips...RECENTLY !!

    --> It's ALL about 'The Win' - isn't it ?!


    Oh yes, and yet ANOTHER Intel-paid-for article and title, Tom's - REALLY?
    Talk about wallowing in the sewer.
    Reply