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Logitech G Pro, Hands On: By Gamers, For Gamers At 83g

Kory "Semphis" Friesen of Team SoloMid inspects G Pro prototypes.

What comes to your mind when you imagine a “professional gaming mouse?” Flashing lights, an elaborate weight system and an obscene amount of buttons? Logitech sees a different picture.

At a briefing for its new Logitech G Pro mouse, Logitech gave us an analogy: When you picture an auto race, what sort of cars would see on the track? Some people might imagine fancy supercars like an Audi R8 or a Lamborghini Gallardo, but in reality, you’ll see Formula 1 or Le Mans cars. Both types of cars are fast, but the latter eschews the leather seats and space-age cup holders for pure, unadulterated performance.

The same applies to what professional gamers look for in a peripheral. A gazillion extra buttons and flashy lighting don't give you a tactical edge over under-equipped noobs with $10 mice. However, all professional gamers really need is a lightweight mouse with an excellent sensor and ergonomic form.

Enter the Logitech G Pro, a no-nonsense gaming mouse created with feedback from pro gamers that comes equipped with the 12,000 DPI Pixart PMW3366 optical sensor, one of the most highly-praised sensors on the market.

Logitech G Pro
SensorPixart PMW3366
ButtonsLeft click, right click, scroll wheel, forward, back, DPI
Resolution200 - 12,000 DPI
Max Acceleration40G
Max Speed300 IPS
USB Data Format16 bits/axis
USB Report Rate1000 Hz (1ms)
Microprocessor32-bit ARM
CableBraided (2 meters)
SoftwareLogitech Gaming Software
Dimensions62.15 x 116.6 x 38.2mm (WxDxH)
Weight83g (mouse only)
Price$69.99

Design, Weight and Usability

Logitech found that the G303 Daedalus Apex was popular due to its button layout, sensor and lighting, but the shape was a major point of contention. Meanwhile, G100s users loved the shape of their mouse and wanted a better sensor. The result is a love child between the two, as the shape is reminiscent of the ergonomic G100s, but includes a top-of-the-line sensor.

As a result of the austere approach, G Pro’s resulting design is rather plain. The only decorative features are the RGB-illuminated Logitech G logo and an accent that encompasses the sides and rear of the mouse.

When it comes to mice, weight is mostly preferential. I prefer heavier mice a mildly aggressive DPI setting, but pro gamers, said Logitech much prefer lighter mice, and rightfully so. ESports athletes, especially those who play first-person shooters such as CS:GO, use low DPI settings and wide mouse pads. This means that their arm travels a fair amount while gaming, and moving a heavy mouse for hours on end can result in fatigue and discomfort.

Without the cable, the mouse weighs only 83g, and its weight is spaced evenly throughout the body. I found the mouse is pleasing to wield, whether using a palm, claw or fingertip grip.

The Logitech G Pro has only six buttons: left and right click, scroll wheel, a DPI button, and forward and back navigation buttons. Keeping in line with the G Pro’s lightweight design, the left and right buttons also felt incredibly light to click, to which Logitech credits its Metal Spring Tensioning System.

Coming from a G502’s Omron switches, the G Pro’s almost effortless click took a little getting used to. Additionally, the travel distance felt a tad shallow, and if you aren’t used to this, you might even find bottoming out unsatisfying. But hey, if a lighter click and shallower travel distance makes all the difference for a professional, who am I to complain?

To keep the G Pro’s weight at a minimum, Logitech omitted the popular infinite scroll wheel that can be found on many of its gaming and professional mice. Instead, a typical scroll wheel with a rubberized finish was included. For such a lightweight mouse with effortless right and left click buttons, the scroll wheel was comparatively heavy. Scrolling felt a bit sluggish, and clicking required much more force than what was to be expected for the G Pro.

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Software: There When You Need It, Gone When You Don’t

As with other mice in the Logitech G family, the G Pro may be configured using the Logitech Gaming Software (LGS). Here, you can create and adjust lighting and button layouts. LGS provides five menus for the G Pro: the Home menu, Pointer Settings, Lighting Settings, Surface Tuning and Heat Map.

In the Home menu, you can choose between storing your settings on the G Pro’s on-board memory or on the computer. ESports leagues such as the League of Legends Championship Series (LCS) have strict peripheral guidelines preventing foreign software or cloud connectivity from being used on tournament machines. Thus, the G Pro’s on-board memory is ideal for pro gamers who can use their favorite settings on any machine worrying about software or drivers.

In the Pointer Settings menu, you can adjust the function of the G Pro's six buttons. These common mouse functions, keystrokes, or user-created multi-key macros. Up to five DPI sensitivity levels between 200 DPI and 12,000 DPI may be assigned. The DPI cycling button is used to, well, cycle through settings, assuming the button hasn't been assigned a different function. Finally, you can adjust the polling rate between 125, 250, 500 and 1000 Hz.

LGS allows you to adjust the G Pro’s Logo lighting, which in turn is synonymous with the accent lighting. The G Pro supports the 16.8 million RGB color spectrum and can sync to any other Logitech peripherals connected to your system. It would have been nice for the logo and accent to be illuminated separately, but doing so might have been an unnecessary addition the G Pro’s weight.

In the Surface Tuning menu, there are three predetermined surface profiles for cloth mouse pads, hard mouse pads, and the Logitech G Pro's factory default profile. The G Pro can easily be calibrated for new surfaces such as veneered wood. The process involves holding the left mouse button while drawing a figure eight with the mouse. Calibration took less than a minute, and the G Pro performed much better than with the factory default profile.

The final menu tracks the G Pro's heat map, which provides statistics on which buttons you press most and how long you press them.

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Mission Accomplished, If That's Your Thing

The Logitech G Pro Gaming Mouse is the result of months of collaboration between Logitech and professional gamers, and the end result was made possible by their input. According to Logitech, the G Pro’s release was delayed by a few months based on the feedback received from the pros, and it shows. The G Pro is incredibly light and comfortable, and most importantly, it tracks spectacularly.

Tyler "Skadoodle" Latham of Cloud 9 using a G Pro

This isn't to say the Logitech G Pro is the perfect mouse. It appeals to a group that wants a well-performing mouse without having to buy into unnecessary upgrades like additional weights or an infinite scroll wheel. You don't have to be a professional gamer to appreciate the Logitech G Pro; you just need to enjoy the simple (and light) things in life.

  • Soul_keeper
    Too bad it don't have a laser sensor.
    and those pesky side buttons are too easy to press on accident every 30 seconds
    Reply
  • RedJaron
    Logitech, what you need to do is make an updated MX Revolution. Update the sensor and keep the same body and great battery life.
    Reply
  • 3ogdy
    18447424 said:
    Logitech, what you need to do is make an updated MX Revolution. Update the sensor and keep the same body and great battery life.

    They released the MX Master in some sort of intent to replace the Revolution...it's just that they failed ergonomically speaking.
    Reply
  • 3ogdy
    It's great to see another quality product from Logitech, but I hope Logitech considers redesigning their flagship MX Master or provide another mouse like it.
    They failed to provide ergonomically positioned controls - the back/forward buttons are wrongfully placed...way too far behind for comfortable use (at least by a damn human).
    Then they provided a microUSB connection in order to connect your mouse to the computer - you would think it could also be operated through that same cable - because LOGIc, LOGItech, because LOGIC. Nope, even if the mouse is connected to a computer through cable, you'd still need a unifying receiver for it to work. "Great".

    You know, this sort of mistakes are hard to make even from the perspective of a company that's new in this industry - which is pretty much the opposite of Logitech, especially in the PC peripherals area.
    Reply
  • RedJaron
    18447671 said:
    18447424 said:
    Logitech, what you need to do is make an updated MX Revolution. Update the sensor and keep the same body and great battery life.
    They released the MX Master in some sort of intent to replace the Revolution...it's just that they failed ergonomically speaking.
    We don't talk about the Performance MX or the MX Master. In fact, I'm pretty sure they never happened. As you said, the thumb buttons on the Master are horribly placed. The G700 and 700S used a similar mould to the Revolution, but everything I read about them said the battery life was junk compared to the Revolution.
    Reply
  • ern88
    I just bought a G502 and I like it a lot. Way better then my G600 I used for fps games.
    Reply
  • pingu_Z
    I had a Revolution but the scroll wheel gave out, so I replaced it with the MX Master. At first I wasn't too sure about it but I like it, it is surprisingly comfortable to use despite its looks. And yes you can use it through the cable I am right now as I am typing this.
    Reply
  • 10tacle
    I'm just so glad Logitech reversed their stance on trying to get out of the PC peripheral business (including racing wheels). Whoever the moron is who initially made that decision I hope they are no longer at Logitech. Loving my M510 general use mouse and my G602 gaming mouse. Was fortunate to score a COD MW3 version of the G105 keyboard in a sales bin at Target for $15. What a lucky find that was! Loving that too.
    Reply
  • pingu_Z
    Logitech got out of making OEM peripherals, as in they no longer make stuff for Dell and HP and the rest to re brand under their own name. They never talked about getting out of the peripheral game as a whole.
    Reply
  • jimmysmitty
    18447287 said:
    Too bad it don't have a laser sensor.
    and those pesky side buttons are too easy to press on accident every 30 seconds

    The sensor in this is the same one in the G502 which is considered one of the best sensors on the market. I have been using it and it feels great. In fact I think it is better than a laser sensor from what I have read.

    18447887 said:
    18447671 said:
    18447424 said:
    Logitech, what you need to do is make an updated MX Revolution. Update the sensor and keep the same body and great battery life.
    They released the MX Master in some sort of intent to replace the Revolution...it's just that they failed ergonomically speaking.
    We don't talk about the Performance MX or the MX Master. In fact, I'm pretty sure they never happened. As you said, the thumb buttons on the Master are horribly placed. The G700 and 700S used a similar mould to the Revolution, but everything I read about them said the battery life was junk compared to the Revolution.

    The only thing I found interesting about the G700 was the ability to plug it into a USB cable to charge and use. However I won't use wireless since it just has too much lag and issues with other things I don't like.

    18447948 said:
    I just bought a G502 and I like it a lot. Way better then my G600 I used for fps games.

    It should be. The G600 (Which I also had at one time) is great for MMORPGs but not as good for FPS games. The G502 is on the other hand and I have been using it since the first one (currently have the G502 Spectrum) and it is a fantastic mouse.

    18448239 said:
    I'm just so glad Logitech reversed their stance on trying to get out of the PC peripheral business (including racing wheels). Whoever the moron is who initially made that decision I hope they are no longer at Logitech. Loving my M510 general use mouse and my G602 gaming mouse. Was fortunate to score a COD MW3 version of the G105 keyboard in a sales bin at Target for $15. What a lucky find that was! Loving that too.

    My wife has the G105. Not a bad keyboard, a lot like the G15 in design but I can't use non mechanical keyboards now. I tried. My work gave me a wireless Logitech keyboard and mouse. It felt unnatural. So I brought in my old K90 and G600 and have felt so much better.
    Reply