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Ryzen 9 7900X Is 30% Faster Than 5900X in New Benchmark

Zen 4
(Image credit: AMD)

According to a new Geekbench 5 score, shared by @BenchLeaks on Twitter, the Ryzen 9 7900X garners a 30% lead over its predecessor, the Ryzen 9 5900X, in Geekbench 5 multi-core and single-core tests. It is enough to potentially land the all-new 7900X a spot in our best CPUs tier list once it arrives in our labs.

The Ryzen 9 7900X scored 2,167 points in the single-threaded test, while in the multi-threaded test, it scored 18,446. According to the official Geekbench browser stats page, the Ryzen 9 5900X scored 1,669 points in the single-core test and 13,946 points in the multi-core test.

This effectively gives the Ryzen 9 7900X a 30% lead in single-threaded performance and a 32% lead in multi-threaded performance over its predecessor. These are very similar stats to what AMD projected with Ryzen 7000 over Ryzen 5000, including a 29% generational gain in single-threaded speed and 45% in multi-threaded tasks.

We do not see the 45% gains here, but that is expected. CPU performance can change drastically depending on the workflow, so Geekbench 5 alone isn't enough to judge CPU performance. At the very least, we see the same 30% gains in the single-threaded test of Geekbench.

Most of Geekbench 5's gains can be attributed directly to the 13% IPC gain coming from the Zen 4 architecture and the 800MHz jump in boost frequency from 4.8GHz to 5.6GHz. But another speed improvement coming from Ryzen 7000 is the addition of AVX-512, which Geekbench 5 will use in its AES-XTS cryptography benchmark.

This also means that the Ryzen 9 7900X's performance upgrades are attributed to better per-core performance since both the 7900X and 5900X share the same 12-core count.

Overall, we cannot use Geekbench 5 solely as a benchmark to judge CPU performance. However, it does give us a clue into the Ryzen 9 7900X's performance outside of AMD's official numbers. We can expect average performance gains to be around the 30% ballpark but expect performance to be far different in niche scenarios that can take advantage of Zen 4's new architectural properties.

Aaron Klotz
Freelance News Writer

Aaron Klotz is a freelance writer for Tom’s Hardware US, covering news topics related to computer hardware such as CPUs, and graphics cards.

  • salgado18
    When I finally decide to upgrade to a new and shiny 5900X, AMD decides to make the biggest generational leap of Ryzen history... :(

    (I like it, but it's still sad)
    Reply
  • Flyfisherman
    I just benchmarked my AMD Ryzen 9 3950X with Geekbench 5 free trial and got these results:
    Single-Core: 1327 and Multi-Core: 12457
    Results: https://browser.geekbench.com/v5/cpu/17321277
    The Ryzen 9 7900X is 63 % faster in Singel-Core and 48 % faster in Multi-Core than my 16-Core Ryzen 9 3950X.
    That is impressive to say the least. :p
    I wonder how Ryzen 9 7950X will score later on...

    Best regards from Sweden
    Reply
  • warezme
    I have been going along with my 3900X and 2080Ti for years now and skipped all of the previous generation mostly because the GPU price grab really left a bad taste in my mouth so I had no desire to upgrade anything. Now is the time to begin the upgrade journey to a 7900X and 4090. This should hold me for a few more years to come.
    Reply
  • Alvar "Miles" Udell
    Still not one bit interested, not with X670E motherboards -required- for full PCIe 5.0 functionality and DDR5 -required-, and reputable X670E motherboards costing north of $500.

    Also after that bait and switch they pulled with the X370 series "No Zen 3 support EVER even though we said it was...Oh wait, we lied, now you get support!" -after- I bought a X570 motherboard for my 5950X, my next system -will- be Intel, full stop.
    Reply
  • Nighthawk117
    salgado18 said:
    When I finally decide to upgrade to a new and shiny 5900X, AMD decides to make the biggest generational leap of Ryzen history... :(

    (I like it, but it's still sad)
    Not really true, it's a 13% increase in IPC which is similar to Zen + to Zen 2. The rest is made up by clock speed increases which come at the expense of power consumption. Plus Zen 2 introduced the 12 and 16 core models.

    If it makes you feel better, I wanted a 5900X, waited for months after release but just couldn't get hold of one. I eventually gave up and got the 10850K instead, it was beaten by the i5 several months later :)

    It's nice to have the latest but I doubt you will find it wanting in the performance department any time soon.
    Reply
  • Bikki
    Alvar Miles Udell said:
    Still not one bit interested, not with X670E motherboards -required- for full PCIe 5.0 functionality and DDR5 -required-, and reputable X670E motherboards costing north of $500.

    Also after that bait and switch they pulled with the X370 series "No Zen 3 support EVER even though we said it was...Oh wait, we lied, now you get support!" -after- I bought a X570 motherboard for my 5950X, my next system -will- be Intel, full stop.

    I belive any AMD exec who reads your story will give you a x670 for free as an apology.
    Reply
  • wifiburger
    considering the 7900x at stock is pushed to the limits, 5900x should be PBO


    here's my 5900x and 4000cl16 bdie
    https://browser.geekbench.com/v5/cpu/17344685
    1781 single 17% weaker vs 7900x
    16695 multi 9.5% weaker vs 7900x

    Also have 4x8 sticks; I can remove 2 stick and do async 4600+ which will boost scores

    30% faster.... :ROFLMAO:
    Reply
  • jp7189
    wifiburger said:
    considering the 7900x at stock is pushed to the limits, 5900x should be PBO


    here's my 5900x and 4000cl16 bdie
    https://browser.geekbench.com/v5/cpu/17344685
    1781 single 17% weaker vs 7900x
    16695 multi 9.5% weaker vs 7900x

    Also have 4x8 sticks; I can remove 2 stick and do async 4600+ which will boost scores

    30% faster.... :ROFLMAO:
    I don't think anyone knows what 7000 series overclocking will be like. Plus count on stability updates for months post introduction before they reach the same maturity as the 5000 series.
    Reply
  • tamalero
    Alvar Miles Udell said:
    Still not one bit interested, not with X670E motherboards -required- for full PCIe 5.0 functionality and DDR5 -required-, and reputable X670E motherboards costing north of $500.

    Also after that bait and switch they pulled with the X370 series "No Zen 3 support EVER even though we said it was...Oh wait, we lied, now you get support!" -after- I bought a X570 motherboard for my 5950X, my next system -will- be Intel, full stop.
    I'd love to get what you're smoking. There are lower priced motherboards.
    Also unlike intel, where you have to sink a new motherboard every 1-2 gens. AMD said the AM5 will be long lived so you only have to buy that board ONCE.
    Reply
  • Alvar "Miles" Udell
    Bikki said:
    I belive any AMD exec who reads your story will give you a x670 for free as an apology.

    I wouldn't take it, not even if it were the MSI GODLIKE insanity and came with a free 7900X.

    Also unlike intel, where you have to sink a new motherboard every 1-2 gens. AMD said the AM5 will be long lived so you only have to buy that board ONCE.

    That's what I thought as well with the ASUS Crosshair VI Extreme, then AMD said NO RYZEN 5000 SERIES SUPPORT ON 300 SERIES MOTHERBOARDS!!!!!! for over a year and actively blocked AIBs from adding it, so I bought an X570S only for them to then stick up their middle fingers and change their mind, cost me an extra $370, on top of the $30 or so RMA shipping for my defective 1800X and $120 for another Windows 10 license because that replacement invalidated my existing license. Oh, and on top of all this, my 5950X doesn't even hit AMD's rated max turbo speed under single threaded workloads nor does it hit the same speeds that TomsHardware and other reviewers saw in their reviews.

    So no, for the first time -ever-, I will not be using AMD in my next build. And I say this as someone who stuck with them through the Phenom II and Bulldozer era when their CPUs were far inferior.
    Reply