Threadripper Pro 7995WX 96-Core CPU Smashes Cinebench Record With An Air Cooler

AMD
(Image credit: AMD)

With its massive core count and extended memory support, AMD's top-of-the-range 96-core Ryzen Threadripper Pro 7995WX was designed to set performance records among the best desktop and workstation CPUs. Which it quickly did by cracking 100,000 points in Cinebench R23 without breaking a sweat. But AMD's Ryzen Threadripper Pro has another trump up its sleeve: overclocking capability.

That overclocking capability appears to be quite significant. SAMPSON, an overclocker from the U.S., has managed to push all 96 Zen 4 cores of a Ryzen Threadripper Pro 7995WX to 4.80 GHz on an Asus Pro WS TRX50-Sage WiFi motherboard while working in AMD Labs. When pushed to such a high frequency, the 96-core monstrous workstation CPU consumes around 1000W, which is beyond what workstation makers would tolerate, given extensive cooling requirements.

By default, AMD's Ryzen Threadripper Pro 7995WX operates at 2.50 GHz and can boost one of its cores to 5.10 GHz, providing enough cooling. A 4.80 GHz frequency on all cores represents a 92% overclock. At around 4.80 GHz, AMD's Ryzen Threadripper Pro 7995WX has managed to set several records in various versions of Cinebench benchmarks:

(Image credit: HWBot/SAMPSON)

Such achievements break 'the overclocked multi-thread performance world record,' as AMD puts it. Meanwhile, it would be nice to see how such a massive overclock of a multi-core CPU affects performance in other benchmarks.

A 4.80 GHz clock speed on AMD's Ryzen Threadripper Pro 7995WX was achieved to make the overclocking results even more impressive. At the same time, the CPU was cooled by an air cooler, a vast IceGiant ProSiphon Elite featuring four fans, and a heatsink that weighed 1440 grams. We can only wonder how loud this thing is, but it did the job.

Anton Shilov
Contributing Writer

Anton Shilov is a contributing writer at Tom’s Hardware. Over the past couple of decades, he has covered everything from CPUs and GPUs to supercomputers and from modern process technologies and latest fab tools to high-tech industry trends.