SanDisk and Toshiba Make World's Smallest NAND

SanDisk and Toshiba have teamed up together to make a 64 Gb, 2-bits-per-cell (X2) based monolithic chip made on 19nm technology, which the companies claim is the smallest and most advanced memory process technology node in the world.

SanDisk will sample its 19nm 64 Gb X2 device this quarter and expects to begin high-volume production in the second half of 2011. At that time, SanDisk will also add 3-bits-per-cell (X3) products fabricated with the 19nm process technology to its product lineup.

"We are excited to introduce the world's smallest and lowest-cost NAND flash chips based on industry-leading 19nm process technology in our ongoing collaboration with our manufacturing partner Toshiba," said Yoram Cedar, executive vice president and chief technology officer, SanDisk. "Products based on this technology are designed to enable new applications, form factors and consumer experience that will continue to drive the flash industry to new heights."

This announcement come days after Intel and Micron announced its 20nm process.

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  • virtualban
    If they increase durability along the way, then I will call it progress.
  • stingstang
    How are we sure that they are really making it 19nm? We can't exactly just measure the size of the transistors ourselves. For all we know, it's 21nm, but they want to claim that they're better.
  • warmon6
    stingstangHow are we sure that they are really making it 19nm? We can't exactly just measure the size of the transistors ourselves. For all we know, it's 21nm, but they want to claim that they're better.


    ???

    Better question is, why are worried if there making 19nm transistors or not?

    It not like "we've always had the ability to measure the transistors size until last year" type of things. For a very very very long time we always had to trust the mouth of the manufacture of the specs when it comes to the transistor sizes. Thats like asking same thing for intel and amd cpu's. How do we surely know that the core i7 2600k has 32nm transistors or amd Phenom ii's have 45nm in it?

    Well unless you have an electron microscope, you cant.