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Sony’s PlayStation 5 Finally Gains 1440p Display Support

Sony PS5
(Image credit: Sony)

Sony’s PlayStation 5 first launched in late 2020 and has remained the best-selling console for this generation. As we quickly approach the console’s second birthday, Sony is bringing yet another feature to its flagship console: support for 1440p monitors. This has been an oft-requested feature by gamers, and we’re glad to see that Sony is finally obliging. 

For those keeping score, the PlayStation 5’s rival, the Xbox Series X, included 1440p support at launch. According to Sony, games will be able to natively output 1440p to your television or the best gaming monitors as long as your display supports that resolution for rendering. As an added bonus, Sony claims that “if you’re playing a game with a higher native resolution like 4K, then you may benefit from improved anti-aliasing through supersampling down to 1440p output.”

Sony PS5

(Image credit: Sony)

Of course, there’s one minor caveat to enabling 1440p support on your PlayStation 5 or PlayStation 5 Digital Edition console: It is currently only accessible through Sony’s System Software Beta Program. Fortunately, registering for the beta program is relatively painless, and you can do so by visiting this link

1440p support isn’t the only new feature added with this latest beta; gamelists allow you to better organize the games installed on your console. Sony says you can have up to 15 gamelists, each containing up to 100 games. So, for example, you could lump all your racing games in one gamelist and all your favorite first-person shooters in another. It’s a simple addition that we’re surprised that Sony didn’t offer earlier for the PlayStation 5. 

Sony also included the ability to compare the difference between 3D and stereo audio streams from one easy-to-use settings screen and added a handful of new features to better your social gaming experience with friends.

According to Sony, the latest beta software for the PlayStation 5 is available starting today for “invited participants in select countries.” Previous beta software releases, which eventually found their way into production, included support for adding your own third-party M.2 PCIe 4.0 SSD and support for variable refresh rates.

Brandon Hill is a senior editor at Tom's Hardware. He has written about PC and Mac tech since the late 1990s with bylines at AnandTech, DailyTech, and Hot Hardware. When he is not consuming copious amounts of tech news, he can be found enjoying the NC mountains or the beach with his wife and two sons.