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Crowdfunding Campaign For 'Wasteland 3' Starts Today

The crowdfunding campaign for inXile Entertainment’s Wasteland 3 is in full swing. The studio initially announced the project last week, but fans now have the chance to back the development process.

The third installment in the franchise puts you in the frozen tundra of Colorado as the last surviving member of a Ranger group called Team November. The area’s inhabitants don’t know about the famous Ranger troops. The group’s reputation in Colorado can turn out for better or worse based on what you do in this unexplored territory. The game will also use a tweaked dialogue system from Torment: Tides of Numenera, which is currently in Early Access.

In addition to the new story, inXile added some new features to the game. For the first time in the series, you can play through the entire campaign with a friend. The turn-based combat from Wasteland 2 will return (with some improvements, of course), but it will include the new team-based abilities that will weaken foes and keep your squad protected at the same time. Vehicles will also make their debut in the new game. You can use the vehicles to explore new areas, store items or even add them to your offensive capabilities by installing a turret on them. Depending on your decisions, the game’s Ranger Base will also evolve as you progress through the story.

Most crowdfunding campaigns are on Kickstarter, but the studio will use Fig to gather pledges from its many backers. Unlike Kickstarter, Fig also allows people to directly stake their money in the game whether they are an accredited (a net worth of over $1 million or make $200,000 for the past two years and expect to make the same amount or more in the current year) or unaccredited investor.

Game Details
NameWasteland 3
TypeRPG, Post-apocalyptic
DeveloperinXile Entertainment
PublisherinXile Entertainment
PlatformsPC, Mac, Linux, PlayStation 4, Xbox One
Where To BuyN/A
Release DateN/A

So far, the campaign is exceeding expectations. An hour after it started, the studio’s Twitter account mentioned that campaign reached half of the requested funds. The goal is to reach $2.75 million, but it’s likely to reach that mark in the next few days. However, you still have until November 3 to back the game.

  • nitrium
    Pity fig is basically glorified Ponzi Scheme. I backed all of inXile's projects so far (W2, Numenera, Bard's Tale) but won't be touching this one.
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hFX0f_YUn1I
    Reply
  • bigpinkdragon286
    I'm going to have to pass. Paying for products I can't guarantee will ever exist seems silly, and after watching the linked video, even if I was in the habit of rewarding for work that hasn't been done yet, I would not invest with this company.
    Reply
  • CarbonK
    I am a fan of the older Fallout 1 and 2 games and Wasteland 2. I'll keep my wallet closed for now as it's a bit too early, but I'm definitely going to keep an eye on this.
    Reply
  • WFang
    Guys, you do realize that the Fig platform allows you to CHOOSE to do one or both of:

    Traditional pledging for the game + swag, JUST like on Kickstarter;
    and/or
    UN-traditional "investing" in the games success by purchasing 'game shares' which will potentially pay you back with every sale of the game once it goes live..

    If you don't like the investment option, then simply don't invest! -You can still back the game just like you would on Kickstarter.
    Reply
  • TJ Hooker
    @nitrium care to elaborate on how/why Fig is a Ponzi scheme? I had never heard of Fig before, but nothing that I read about their business model from their wikipedia page even remotely remotely suggests a Ponzi scheme.
    Reply
  • nitrium
    18692486 said:
    @nitrium care to elaborate on how/why Fig is a Ponzi scheme? I had never heard of Fig before, but nothing that I read about their business model from their wikipedia page even remotely remotely suggests a Ponzi scheme.
    Did you not watch the YouTube video in my post???
    Reply
  • RomeoReject
    If the fact that investing goes primarily to the entities involved with created said product, literally every publicly traded stock on earth is a Ponzi scheme. The issue has nothing to do with having viewed the video, it has to do with the fact that video is nonsense.
    Reply
  • nitrium
    18695038 said:
    If the fact that investing goes primarily to the entities involved with created said product, literally every publicly traded stock on earth is a Ponzi scheme. The issue has nothing to do with having viewed the video, it has to do with the fact that video is nonsense.
    Huh? If I buy a publically traded stock and it doubles in price, I can double my money when I sell it. If I buy FIG "stock" in a product and it doubles in price I get basically no gain whatsoever because it all gets funnelled back to the creators. Does that sound the same to you?

    Reply
  • TJ Hooker
    18694310 said:
    18692486 said:
    @nitrium care to elaborate on how/why Fig is a Ponzi scheme? I had never heard of Fig before, but nothing that I read about their business model from their wikipedia page even remotely remotely suggests a Ponzi scheme.
    Did you not watch the YouTube video in my post???
    I watched most of it now. There is a single image with the words 'sounds like a Ponzi Scheme' (or something to that effect), with essentially no discussion about it, but otherwise the entire video focuses on why investing in Fig is a bad idea. It doesn't really talk about Fig being a Ponzi scheme, it doesn't even really talk about how pledging to a Fig campaign (à la Kickstarter) is a bad idea, it specifically talks about how the option to invest is a terrible idea. And in that respect, I agree that the video seems to make a good point.

    18695470 said:
    18695038 said:
    If the fact that investing goes primarily to the entities involved with created said product, literally every publicly traded stock on earth is a Ponzi scheme. The issue has nothing to do with having viewed the video, it has to do with the fact that video is nonsense.
    Huh? If I buy a publically traded stock and it doubles in price, I can double my money when I sell it. If I buy FIG "stock" in a product and it doubles in price I get basically no gain whatsoever because it all gets funnelled back to the creators. Does that sound the same to you?
    That sounds like a bad investment, but does not describe a Ponzi scheme.
    Reply