Microsoft Confirms Windows 11 22H2 App Failures After System Restore

Windows 11
(Image credit: Microsoft)

It looks as though Windows 11 22H2 users are experiencing another bout of difficulties with the operating system. Although Microsoft's mission with Windows 10 and 11 has been to offer continual upgrades to performance and features with two major updates per year (and many smaller ones in between), there are still bugs that manage to creep up occasionally. The latest issue, filed under KB5023152 (opens in new tab), involves apps crashing while opening after performing a system restore.

According to Microsoft, users running Windows 11 22H2 may encounter the following issues after performing a system restore:

  • An error message "This app can't open" is displayed instead of the app starting.
  • The app might have multiple entries on the Start menu.
  • An app may not respond when you try to start the app.
  • An I/O error may occur, followed by the app not responding, and then the app crashes.
  • If you try to start the app again, the app now runs.

Although this is not a comprehensive list, Microsoft says that Notepad, Paint, Office, Cortana and Terminal are all affected by the latest Windows 11 22H2 problems. What all the apps have in common is the use of the MSIX package format. Microsoft boasted in a 2021 support document (opens in new tab) that MSIX has a 99.96 percent success rate over "millions of installs," is disk space optimized to avoid file duplication across apps, and reduces network bandwidth requirements.

Microsoft's solution to the ongoing problem is an exercise in Troubleshooting 101. The company suggests that users try restarting the app, reinstalling the app or running Windows Update in hopes of resolving the issue. However, what's interesting is that Microsoft usually will note that it is working to fix the root cause of these app failures and give an estimated timeframe for a fix. Unfortunately, Microsoft doesn't provide that guidance with KB5023152.

It is also somewhat ironic that Windows users typically resort to using system restore when they encounter major software problems. Perhaps a rogue software package wreaked havoc, or you find yourself in driver hell with a piece of hardware. System restore is supposed to offer a relatively pain-free way of taking your machine back to a date before the troubles began. It's a much quicker solution than nuking the operating system and starting from scratch.

But in this instance, system restore potentially solves one problem while creating more in its wake. That's not a good look for Microsoft, but we hope a quick fix is in the pipeline to save Windows 11 22H2 users from these headaches.

Brandon Hill

Brandon Hill is a senior editor at Tom's Hardware. He has written about PC and Mac tech since the late 1990s with bylines at AnandTech, DailyTech, and Hot Hardware. When he is not consuming copious amounts of tech news, he can be found enjoying the NC mountains or the beach with his wife and two sons.

  • Amdlova
    Windows 11 is a newest version of windows me. Can't support that. Windows 10 is the last Microsoft system, before that is Linux or Mac os.
    Google os is Maybe will be the new thing. (Maybe)
    Reply
  • PlaneInTheSky
    As someone running both Windows 10 and Windows 11 systems...the people who stayed with Windows 10 dodged a bullet. 90% of our OS related issues are on Windows 11.
    Reply
  • JamesJones44
    I have to 2nd what others have said here. Windows 11 has been a hot mess for me, especially if you do any kind of VM or ML work, lots and lots of issues. No issues with either in Windows 10 though. I check back every time they do a big update to 11, but it seems they don't want or can't address the issues because they haven't gotten any better.
    Reply
  • Katana.lx
    Never once I made a system restore that works (in all version of windows)... in the end it's all format c:
    Reply
  • ThatMouse
    You need to use Windows Restore in order to roll back a release of Windows 11. So I rolled back to 21H2. I was having the nvidia stuttering issue on 22H2 and am afraid to take it. Now in version limbo.
    Reply
  • TechieTwo
    This is precisely why most businesses refuse to update to the latest version of Windows - because it always proves to be a very expensive disaster for small Biz as well as large corporations. It's outrageous and often criminal to release such defective products and updates. Microsoft may get away with this business model in the U.S. but not in every country.
    Reply
  • USAFRet
    PlaneInTheSky said:
    As someone running both Windows 10 and Windows 11 systems...the people who stayed with Windows 10 dodged a bullet. 90% of our OS related issues are on Windows 11.
    JamesJones44 said:
    I have to 2nd what others have said here. Windows 11 has been a hot mess for me, especially if you do any kind of VM or ML work, lots and lots of issues. No issues with either in Windows 10 though. I check back every time they do a big update to 11, but it seems they don't want or can't address the issues because they haven't gotten any better.
    While I only have 2 Win 11 systems (along with several Win 10)...neither of the Win 11 has had any issues since Day 1 of turning them on.
    One built, one purchased (Surface 3 G0)

    Problems happen with every OS update, in the history of ever. No matter what OS. Windows, Linux, Apple, etc, etc.

    Of course companies take a much slower approach to mass upgrades. Any responsible enterprise does not just in to a new OS with both feet.

    Problems we're seeing with WIn 11 are little different than what we saw with WIn 10 initially. Or 8. Or 7. Or XP.
    Or any other OS.
    Reply
  • jabliese
    USAFRet said:
    Problems we're seeing with WIn 11 are little different than what we saw with WIn 10 initially. Or 8. Or 7. Or XP.
    Or any other OS.

    Yea, that Notepad has been a real source of pain over the years. Sorry, this is different than what we have seen before.
    Reply
  • USAFRet
    jabliese said:
    Yea, that Notepad has been a real source of pain over the years. Sorry, this is different than what we have seen before.
    I didn't mean one particular little problem.

    I mean in the wider sense of "Every new OS release has issues of some sort".

    But you go on with your hatred of Win 11.
    Reply