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Update: German Site Reports Windows 12 Development to Begin Next month

Microsoft Windows 12
Microsoft Windows 12 (Image credit: Future)

Update (9:51 pm GMT): After publishing a Tweet claiming that Windows 12 was being worked on and would have "two TPMs," Swift on Security has put up a second Tweet saying that the first one was nothing more than a joke. Deskmodder.de, however, maintains that a new version of Windows will begin development in March 2022. An earlier version of this article had cited Swift on Security's tweet as corroboration of Deskmodder's still-serious claims. We've clarified where necessary in the article below. 

Amended article:

We don't know much about Deskmodder.de's alleged inside source at Microsoft, but the German site claims it has information that the Redmond software giant has either started or is on the verge of beginning the development of Windows 12 (via Computerbase.de). If true, Microsoft would do this just days after delivering the most significant update to Windows 11 since its introduction.

Earlier in the day, it appeared that Deskmodder.de had some very reliable corroboration. For example, Microsoft MVP Swift on Security (opens in new tab) tweeted that a source at Microsoft had told him, "Windows 12 is already under development, and it's going to require two TPMs." 

The "two TPMs," was a joke which is relevant because Windows 11 is the first version of the OS to require TPM at all (see how to bypass Windows 11's TPM requirement). However, before Swift said this was a joke, we speculated that the "two TPMs" could actually refer to two different security methods, such as the fTPM still present in the AMD Platform Security Processor and the additional security in the new on-chip Microsoft Pluton Processor.

Now that Swift has stated that its information was nothing more than a joke, we are left without much detail about the rumor Deskmodder.de is reporting, and it's unclear whether there's any grain of truth to it. However, it's easy to imagine that there will eventually be another major version of Windows after Windows 11 and that Microsoft could begin the multi-year process of development even now.

Are Windows Major Version Updates on a Roll Again?

Windows 10 was presumably the last version of the Windows OS when released back in 2015. It was pleasant to know that we would have an extended period of stability, with biannually alternating under-the-hood and feature updates from the OS that saved us from Windows 8. However, the announcement and launch of Windows 11 rudely awoke us from our contented undulating OS progress.

The story goes that Windows 11 was somehow necessary as the scale of the change demanded it. Some of the most significant heralded changes included a revamped task scheduler, which would make PCs more efficient with Intel's hybrid architecture Alder Lake processors becoming mainstream. Furthermore, there was a lot of emphasis on system security. It was mainly on this altar that Microsoft felt confident enough to sacrifice many serviceable older-gen CPUs (Intel Kaby Lake or older, AMD Ryzen 1000 or older).

So far, Windows 11 doesn't seem to have caught the hearts and minds of PC users. However, Windows has a fabled good version / bad version cycle. For this reason, as well as perhaps pressure from systems and component makers to promote hardware upgrades, Microsoft might be getting back on the regular major Windows version update track.

However, at this point, these rumors about Windows 12 development require a really big grain of salt.

Mark Tyson
Mark Tyson

Mark Tyson is a Freelance News Writer at Tom's Hardware US. He enjoys covering the full breadth of PC tech; from business and semiconductor design to products approaching the edge of reason.

  • Historical Fidelity
    Well it makes sense….windows 11 is hot garbage….
    Reply
  • Friesiansam
    Given that W11 is certainly not without it's problems and that W10, on both mine and my wife's PCs, is problem free, I think we will give W11 a miss and wait for W12.
    Reply
  • DavidMV
    Friesiansam said:
    Given that W11 is certainly not without it's problems and that W10, on both mine and my wife's PCs, is problem free, I think we will give W11 a miss and wait for W12.

    I've been using Windows 11 for 2 months with almost zero problems... a couple improvements I would like to see... but honestly it isn't that much different than W10. Try it.
    Reply
  • hotaru.hino
    And who's to say that Windows 12 isn't going to have a laundry list of problems that every OS goes through during its launch?
    Reply
  • randomizer
    DavidMV said:
    I've been using Windows 11 for 2 months with almost zero problems... a couple improvements I would like to see... but honestly it isn't that much different than W10. Try it.

    If it isn't much different, why bother trying it?
    Reply
  • IceQueen0607
    It was pleasant to know that we would have an extended period of stability,
    Except that Microsoft never got Windows 10, it's updates or security patches stable - ever. They just kept changing useless crap like the UI and throwing more telemetry riddled garbage at users and eventually gave up on that and gave us Windows 11, which as Historical Fidelity said, is a "hot piece of garbage".

    How many of the last 55 months of updates didn't bring a new or re-introduced a previous "fixed" problem? Not many.
    Reply
  • peachpuff
    Whatever happened to windows 10 being the last windows and simply being constantly updated? 🙄
    Reply
  • DRagor
    peachpuff said:
    Whatever happened to windows 10 being the last windows and simply being constantly updated? 🙄
    Covid killed it and then reanimated as a zombie. Or something like that ...
    Reply
  • Alvar "Miles" Udell
    Honestly I can see Microsoft developing another OS, but not a replacement for Windows 11, at least not at this stage 4 months after public release, but instead a true lightweight OS to actually challenge ChromeOS, especially since Google announced ChromeOS Flex.

    I know they said they gave up on it and merged it into the core Windows, but Microsoft is so determined to get Windows on every device and keep any form of Linux out as much as they can that I can see them doing it.
    Reply
  • mrmaagoolew923
    Why bother. A lot of people don't even like W11. It seems to me that they are just wasting money or they are going to put extra features in it that they will make you pay for just like they and some auto makers are doing right now. I keep threatening to go to Linux, but I think the time is coming very soon that I will even though I don't know that much about it. I guess I'll have to start reading up about it.
    Reply