Ryzen AI 7 Pro 360 exposed in new benchmark — octa-core Zen 5 chip falls behind the Core Ultra 9 185H

Ryzen Pro
(Image credit: AMD)

The Ryzen AI 9 HX 370 12-core mobile CPU was spotted in yet another leaked benchmark run, combined with a new Ryzen 7 part dubbed the Ryzen AI 7 Pro 360. As reported by IT Home, the two processors were spotted in the CrossMark benchmark, where the Ryzen 9 AI HX 370 outperformed Intel's outgoing Core Ultra 9 185H processor. However, the Ryzen AI 7 Pro 360 showed underwhelming results, beaten by a two-generation old Ryzen 9 7940HS with the exact core count.

Technically, we have already reported on the Ryzen AI 7 Pro 360, but in our previous coverage, it was known as the Ryzen AI 7 Pro 160. If you don't know by now, the 100 Series nomenclature was originally going to be the name of AMD's first generation Ryzen AI lineup, but AMD switched the numbering scheme from 100 to 300 at the last minute. As a result, the Ryzen AI 7 Pro 160 and the Ryzen AI 7 Pro 360 have the same chip.

We now have two confirmations that the Ryzen AI 7 Pro 360 is an 8-core Zen 5 CPU, boasting two core clusters featuring odd-core counts. One cluster has three regular Zen 5 cores, while the other sports five smaller Zen 5c cores. The 8-core configuration is backed up by just 8MB of L3 cache and 8MB of L2 cache (supposedly), and a Radeon 870M GPU, which is suspected of coming with 8 CUs (half the core count of the Radeon 890M).

(Image credit: IT Home)

The posted PassMark benchmark results compared four CPUs: the Ryzen AI 9 HX 370, Ryzen AI 7 Pro 360, Core Ultra 9 185H, and Ryzen 9 7940HS (mistakenly labeled as a Ryzen 7 SKU on the image).

The Ryzen AI 9 HX 370 scored 1,713 points overall, featuring 1,549 points in the productivity segment, 2,128 points in the creativity segment, and 1,212 points in the responsiveness segment.

The next fastest chip in the group was the Meteor Lake-based Core Ultra 9 185H, sporting 16 cores and 22 threads. The Intel chip scored 1,693 points overall, 1,549 points in the productivity segment, 1,981 points in the creativity segment, and 1,391 points in the responsiveness segment.

The third fastest chip was AMD's previous generation, Ryzen 9 7940HS, sporting eight Zen 4 cores. Overall, the chip scored 1,623 points, 1,561 points in the productivity segment of the CrossMark benchmark, 1,792 points in the creativity segment, and 1,369 points in the responsiveness segment.

The Ryzen AI 7 Pro 360 is the back of the pack, the slowest of the four CPUs in this benchmark run. The Zen 5 mobile processor scored 1,373 points overall, 1,267 points in productivity, 1,639 points in creativity, and 1,023 points in responsiveness.

Swipe to scroll horizontally
CPUsOverall ScoreProductivity ScoreCreativity ScoreResponsiveness Score
Ryzen AI 9 HX 3701,7131,5492,1281,212
Core Ultra 9 185H1,6931,5491,9811,391
Ryzen 9 7940HS1,6231,5611,7921,369
Ryzen AI 7 Pro 3601,3731,2671,6391,023

The Ryzen AI 9 HX 370's results are not surprising. The chip outperformed all the other CPUs in performance thanks to its twelve Zen 5/Zen 5c cores. Intel's Meteor Lake Core Ultra 9 185H, despite its larger core count, should be considered a previous-generation product now. Intel is getting ready to release its Ryzen AI 300 series competitor, Lunar Lake, later this year, hopefully closing the gap with AMD and its speedier Zen 5 architecture.

The Ryzen AI 7 Pro 360's results are more surprising. Previously, we saw the chip outperform the Ryzen 9 8945HS (a newer variant of the 7940HS) in Geekbench. The story is much different here, with the pro series Zen 5 chip noticeably underperforming compared to the Ryzen 9 7940HS. The 7940HS is 18% faster compared to the Ryzen AI 7 Pro 360 in the overall benchmark score.

This shows that we can't take these results too seriously; the Ryzen AI Pro 360 in this test could potentially be an engineering sample with much lower clocks than its future production counterpart. The performance results aren't surprising, given that the Pro 360 sports half the L3 cache capacity compared to the Ryzen 7 9740HS. If CrossMark is an L3-sensitive benchmark, that would explain the performance deficit.

Aaron Klotz
Contributing Writer

Aaron Klotz is a contributing writer for Tom’s Hardware, covering news related to computer hardware such as CPUs, and graphics cards.

  • Metal Messiah.
    We now have two confirmations that the Ryzen AI 7 Pro 360 is an 8-core Zen 5 CPU, boasting two core clusters featuring odd-core counts. One cluster has three regular Zen 5 cores, while the other sports five smaller Zen 5c cores.

    The 8-core configuration is backed up by just 8MB of L3 cache and 8MB of L2 cache (supposedly), and a Radeon 870M GPU, which is suspected of coming with 8 CUs (half the core count of the Radeon 890M).

    Wrong.

    The iGPU is the 880M with 12CUs. Even the benchmark says the Ryzen AI 7 PRO 360 APU comes with 880M. Don't just blindly copy/paste text from ITHOME.

    Do your own homework first. Poor reporting as always.

    I highlighted this before in my previous post, that this chip sports the 880M igpu, and not the 870M.

    https://results.bapco.com/fdr/63444

    Reply
  • Metal Messiah.
    It would have been nice if we knew the exact TDPs these were running at, especially for the new AI 7 Pro 360.

    Because all the Ryzen AI 300 chips can scale from 15W up to 54W, so the performance can vary differently, plus these could very well be early samples for all we know.

    And, on top of that, these BAPCO scores are pretty useless to begin with. So there is no point in comparing the chip to Ryzen 9 7940HS or the Core Ultra 9 185H.
    Reply
  • TechyIT223
    Zen 5 is still a "old" concept of x86 architecture with monolithic die.

    Strix Halo might give us an idea of what chiplets on mobile can bring with a big x86 APU, but we're a couple of generation behind.

    On topic of APU it's nice to see this odd core configuration. They must do a 1 Zen 5 + 7 Zen5c configuration for even better efficient and low power laptop models.

    Good for business and enterprise processor lineup.
    Reply